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March 14, 1931 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-03-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MIC HTCAN DAILY

SA TDfAY. MARCR $~14. 1931

1.111 VL LI(yl . lYll1A4V 11 1Z 1w7U8

EULS VERNE, KIN
CAM-P IN WYOMING ofWRTR.SAL
JULERITER, S AILS
WILL AGAIN OFFER
SUMMER OURSES

EEGAINS IN BUSI tS

I

Improvement in Building, Fewer
Failures Said to Indicate
Better Conditions.

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Students May Study Surveying
Geodesy at Camp Davis, in
Jackson Hole Region.
PLAN YELLOWSTONE TRIP
1931 Session Will be Third in
New Location; University
Credit Given.
Engineering students interested
in geodesy and surveying will aga =n
this summer enjoy the advantages
offered by Camp Davis, Jack>i,C
Wyoming which is being condu-1c1d
as part of the University's 19!1
Summer Session.
The camp, located in a broad val-
ley and surrounded by thickly
wooded hills, is an ideal location
for engineering surveys and field
work. It consists of 120 acres of
land along the Hoback river, 20
miles south of Jackson, and 75
miles south of Yellowstone Nation-
al park.
Go to Yellowstone.
Last summer those attending the
camp made a three-day trip to
Yellowstone. Two members of the
party climbed the grand Teton, a
feat that few have accomplished.
Within a short distance of Camp
Davis several "dude" ranches are
located where the students may
obtain saddle-horses.
The camp's equipment consists
of student residence buildings,
shower baths, offices, store, mess
hall, keeper's house, instrument
room, shop and power plant, ga-
rage,, and residence buildings for
the teaching staff and guests. Res-
idence buildings have electricity
and running water.
This year will be the third ses-
sion for Camp Davis in its Wyom-
ing location. From 1909 to 1929 it
was located on the south end of
Douglas lake in the northern part
of the lower peninsula of Michi-
gAn. During that period the adja-
cent area was protected from fires,
with the result that the vegetation
became so dense that the site was
no longer desirable for surveying.
Come From All Parts.
Students at the camp come from
engineering colleges in all parts of
the country. Many drive west in
their own cars taking classmates
with them. Those who wish are'
permitted to ride on University
trucks which transport equipment
from Ann Arbor to Wyoming.
Dean Sadler Returns
From Purdue Lecture
Dean Herbert C. Sadler, of the
engineering college, returned yes-
terday from Lafayette, Ind., where
on Tuesday he addressed the senior
engineering class of Purdue uni-
versity.

Further signs of slight improve-
ment in building prospects have
been reported by Bradstreet's fin-
4ncial journal. The visible improve-
ment of January over the preceding
month and *thedecrease in the
number of failures, cited last month,
has become a little more pronounc-
ed in the February returns, the re-
port shows.
Five, groups of cities of the seven
groups info which Bradstreets
compilation is divided reported
gains over January, whereas only
three groups in January showed
gains over December, and it is not-
ed that New York City, which, with
the southwestern cities, accounted
for the entire gain in January, has
maintained in February the per-
centage of increase over a year ago
shown in January, and while the
southwestern group has not shown
an increase as it did in January,
the southern cities do report a
small increase.

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Butcher Shop Raid
Reveals Moonsh ne
inSasage Sheaths
HAMMOND, Ind., Mar. 13.-(A )
-Revenge imaybe sweet for Al-
bert Szymoniak.
Albert is a butcher. He used to
work in the shop of John Briggs,
until Briggs discharged him.
"I'll get my revenge," said he.
Thursday, police said, he did.
He led the officers in a raid on
the place of his erstwhile em-
ployer, pointing to a string of
sausages. Inside the sheaths, the
rOi;e sald, there was moon-
shine.

MUS EM BUILDING GATE'S HISTORY
SHW TRGL BHN CETO

Interesting Use of Wrought Iron
In Architecture Exemplified
by Pondorous Gates.
By Morton Frank, '33.
The mighty gates of the Univers-
ity Museum building shine bril-
liantly-not only in the reflection
of a polif~ed metal, but in a his-,
tory. As. The Daily pointed out in
1929, "'thereby hangs a tale."
Less than a decade ago, Roscoe
L. Wood transferred from the Uni-
versity to the Massachusetts Insti-
tite of Technology to study for the
fAgree of bachelor of architecture.
There he was recognized not only
as an apt architect, but also as a
free-thinker, for he believed that
architecture'was an art of suecial-
ization. He sponsored the doctrine
that more care should be given to
developing the finer details of de-
sign, with experts in particular
ines drawing the plans for the
most minute specifications.
Imbued with the idea of inter-
esting architects in wrought iron
and sculpture, he began work in
Boston, hub of conservatism, with
the leading church building archi-
tects in the country.
Visualizing even greater advance-
ments than the field of church
architecture could offer, he soon
obtained a position with the Amer-

ican representative of Edgar Brandt
of Paris, leader of the modernistic
movement in wrought iron. At the
same time, he cooperated with
Oscar B. Bach, another leader in
the development of wrought iron
for architectural use.
In a search for simple subjects
to inspire him, he returned to his
father's farm, where he set up an
anvil and forge, on which he exe-
cuted, among other models, a pair
of crude garden gates.
Four years ago, Woo:d exhibited'
the gates at the annual Ann Arbor
artists' show, and, as The Daily ex-
plained, "they attracted the atten-
tion of Dr. Alexander G. Ruthven,
dean of administration and director
of the University museums." Pleas-
ed by Wood's craft, Dr. Ruthven
asked that five pairs of gates be
made for the museum, then only
an unrealized project, with a free
hand given to Wood for their de-
signs.
The architectural modernist be-
gan his task. He investigated na-
tural history, to find a motif in-
dicative of the natural research
of the museum's staff. He sought
the advice of his father, Elmer D.
Wood, a retired blacksmith who was
in partnership with him in the Ard-
more Gardens Forge near Packard
street.

NEW-PARTY TIPI
O1F TALKTIISDI
Secretary of Political Leag
to Discuss Proposed
'Third Party.'
"Does the United States Need
New Political Party?" will be t
topic of the speech Howard Y. W
liams, executive secretary of t
League for Independent Politic
Action, will deliver at 4:15 o'clo
next Tuesday in room 231 Ang
hall, under the auspices of t
Round Table club.
The national chairman of t
league is John Dewey, of Colmnb
university, author of the recent le
ter to Senator George Norris,
which he said that progressives-
over the United States wanted
new political party, and urged.thl
Norris leave the Republican pai
to head the proposed new orga
ization.
The league states that it w
formed "because of a realizati
that our existing political parti
in the conduct of government a
more concerned to serve thesefi
and financial interests ,of the i
rather than the human needs
the many."

AssociatedPress rnoto
Jean Jules Verne,
Grandson of the writer, sailed for
New York from France to be a guest
at the launching of Sir Hubert Wil-
kins' polar submarine, Nautilus.
FENULFS__ VILAGE
Towns of Berges and Michaud
Buried; Residents Escape
Without Injury,
CHAMBERY, France, Mar. 13.-
(P)--Government engineers today
attempted to divert an enormous
landslide which was bearing down
upon the picturesque village of Le
Chatelard at the rate of 500 feet
an hour after engulfing Berges and
Michaud.
The landslide, brought on by the
excessive rainfall of the past few
weeks, broke loose from the hill-
side with a loud rumbling and
crashing land moved downward
with an area of about 100 acres.
Its volume was estimated at 200,-
000,000 cubic feet.
The engineers ordered the 125
inhabitants to move out of Le
Chatelard, which is well known to
tourists who 'visit Aix-Les-Bains.
There were no casualties in either
Berges or Michaud. Another slide,
of about 1,000,000 cubic feet block-
ed a road near Moutiers-Tarantaise.
What's Going On
Majestic-Ann Harding in "East
Lynne," with Clive Brook and Con-
rad Nagel.
Michigan-Buster Keaton in"Palr-
lor, Bedroom and Bath," with Char-
lotte Greenwood, Reginald Denny,
and Cliff Edwards.
Wuerth-Victor McLaglen in "A
Devil with Women."

Death Bill Ordered
o~Ballots by Court
LANSING, Mar. 13.-(R)--The su-
preme court today refused to order
a capital ,unishment proposal
stricken from the April 6 electionf
ballots.
A petition filed on behalf of the
Citizen's Right's club asking a writ
to compel Frank D. Fitzgerald,
secretary of state, to cancel his
certification of the death penalty
act was denied by the court with-
out comment. The issue is thus as-
sured a place on the April ballots..

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