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March 11, 1931 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-03-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

0

T t1 , VIf3 tiC K I1., ' J; '_

. ........ ....

9[ LEA MI\ClH IllAN
WGlHIAASOF SNO
Travel in Many Parts of State
Blocked by Hardpacked,
High Drifts.

CIVILIANS AID TROOPS TO QUELL
REBEL UPRISING IN SOUTH AMERIC

RURAL MAIL STOPPED
Motorists Marooned at Trial
f Backing Through Banks
of Snow Fal.
(l v Associated Press)
Highway traffic was at a stand-
still in many parts of Michiga
yesterday as road crews labo: -
with hard-packed snowdrifts th, t
reached as high as seven to cigff
feet.
Greyhound bus schedules from
Benton Harbor south to Chicago
werencanceled because of the con-
dition of highway UTS-31 south of
Benton Harbor. M-37 between Hast-
ings and Battle Creek was reported
by bus companies to be closed to all
wheeled traffic, while eight-foot
drifts were reported between Cas-
novia and Muskegon. Travel on
rural roads was impossible in many
sections.
Rural Mail Held Up.
Rural mail deliveries were re-
ported held up since Saturday in

S
2
E
L
V
J
i t
2

I Dgm c-oectig -apecinens
EI in Eilp ngUNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS - A
in Early pring. weather station which will have the
facilities for recording soil as well
Urging that teacners secure col- as atmospheric conditions is the
lections of zoological specimens project to be put into practice this
through actual field work instead spring on a nearby farm by the
of from supply houses, Prof. Arthui reuatment of agronomy.
F1 Woodhead, of the zoology de- TO GIVE PRIZES FOR BEARDS
partment, yesterday in a radio ad-
dress told how to collect various UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA-
specimens that are valuable to the When sophomores gather at noon
March 14 to vie for whisker honors,
study of biology. prizes will be awarded to the three
"Begin your collection just as men who will have cultivated the
soon as this snow disappears. If longest, the most artistic, and the
d a reddest beards.

Associated Press Photo

Citizens of Peru are shown as they assisted loyal government troops
in quelling an uprising of rebels at Callao. The revolt, which spread
throughout the country, resulted in the resignation of Sanchez Cerro
as president in favor of a cabinet headed by Ricardo Leoncio Elias.

zsome isolated sections.
In the vicinity of Holland
motorists who attempted to
their way through the hard
wei e marooned for several]
before being extricated byt
and tractors. All these carsf
it necessary to retrace their

many
back
drifts
hours
teams
found
jour-

neys or stop over on their routes,
awaiting a clearing of the roads.
Train service was reported near-{
ing anormal schedule,ralthough
Pere Marquette trains north out of
Chicago were running two hours
late this morning. Monday some
trains were as much as seven hours#
behind schedule. Engineers report-
ed sending their trains over routes
among banks almost as high as thet
locomotives in some places.
On US-16 in Ionia county, just
Nzcst of the intersection with M-43,
creat difficulty will be experienced
in keeping the road open. One way
tfaific was in-effect there. A con-"
tinued fall of snow today did notE
make the prospect more encourag-E
ing.
Report High Drifts.'
Drifts five to seven feet were re-t
ported today as covering an eight-
mile ,stretch on M-32 east of Shel-
by, but road workers expected to
clear- the route by noon unless a
light snow fall should increase.
Roads in Kent county were kept
open by constantly operating plows
and other equipment.
Roads in and out of Alpena were
stillsblocked today accordingrto re-
ports, US-23 and US-27 north ofI
Bay City were passable but motor-
ists were 'cautioned against plan-
ning any extensive trips onthem.,
M-33 to Rose City was open, but
there.were bad drifts between Rose
City and St. Helen.
The highways up the center of
the state were open to the straits
but mostly were capable of caring
only for one-way traffic. East and
west highways were only fit for
one-way traffic , too.
Roads to Detroit are passable and
fairly good, although rough in spots.
West of Owosso M-21 is blocked.
M-46 out Gratiot Ave. to Alma is
badly drifted.
Veterans Organization
Will Finance Building
Plans to finance the building of
a proposed Veterans' building in
Ann Arbor have been submitted to
the Veterans' council, which is in-
vestigating the proposals.
According to representatives of the
council, the organization, which
consists of all the military organ-
izations in W ashtenaw county, is
planning to bring the matter to the,
attention of the county board of
supervisors in April, for the pur- ;
pose of ascertaining the legal status
of a plan to finance the proposed
building in part by taxation.
TYPEWRITERd
REPAiRING
All makes of machines.'
Our equipmient and per-
s o v i e 1 are considered
amolig the best in the_ Stat,. The resut wxt er'crhi )liz
.ny 'caref l l
0. D. MORRILL

SI A' k WiTOll G'
ON DEATHPEI A LTY
Speakers Will Give Viewpoints
on Death Penalty Before
Tolstoy Group.
"Capital Punishment. Its Cause;
Do We Need the Death Penalty,"
will be the topic dtscussed at a meet-
ing of the Tolstoy league at 4:151
o'clock Friday, in the Natural Sci-I
ence auditorium.I
Prof. Arthur E. Wood, of the so-
ciology department, will act as
chairman of the meeting.
The speakers are Prof. H. R. Cof-
fey, law librarian, who will tell why
he thinks hat he measure is unnec-
essary; Dr. Buenaventura Jimenez,
of the Health Service, who will dis-
cuss the matter from the viewpoint
of the theosophist; and Dr. Francis
S. Onderdonk, of the school of ar-
chitecture, who will give the Quak-
er outlook on capital punishment.
"The purpose of the meeting," Dr.
Onderdonk said, "is to~afford oppor-
tunity for discussion of this mat-
ter which is now pending referen-
dum.
---
FRATERNITY JEWELRY
ARCADE JEV

Saccompany mm at the piano.
StoreyRe od elling --
to be Started Soon you do not you will miss some of
-i the interesting early species," he
Remodelling of the F. W. Wool- warned. After the collection has
swept bysre, whicla stsarted Ibeen made, students should be per-
soon as debris has been cleared mtted to examine and report on
away and the interior cleaned, tle life found in the collection.
company officials said yesterday.
More than a score of workmen Graduate Fraternity
ha v e been employed. Work, Will old Initiation
which was started Monday, is Wd__
expected to be finished soon, and Beta, University chapter of Iota
remodelling, it was said, is ex- Aea, Unry pI
pected to be completed by May 1. 1 p h a, honorary graduate engi-
-__neering fraternity, will hold its ini-
~ ~~~ itiation and banquet at 6:30 o'clock
New York City Chb tomorrow night at the Union.
It is expected that more than 40
Reports cn Proiect'i initiates will be received into the
society at the time. The speaker of
The faculty salary endowment the evening will be L. Clayton Hill,
fund, project of the University of vice president and general manager
Michigan club of New York City of Dietrich, incorporated, Detroit
Michgan lub f Ne Yor automobile body desi ning firm.
has its part in the 10-year program
was discussed at a luncheon meet- ---
ing held last week-end. More than
$200,000 has already been raised by
the members.
The annual banquet of the club
as well as the luncheon meeting
was attended by President Alexan-
der G. Ruthven, Shirley Smith,
vice president, Clarence S. Yoakum,
vice president, and T. Hawley Tap-
pirg, of the Alumni association.

r

PARTY FAVORS
ELRY SHOP

j! j

CARL F. BAY
JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST
Nickels Arcade

- (No Admission Charge)
UNIVERSTYYPH Y
DAVID MATTERN, Conductor
Sun., March 15, 4:15, Hill Auditorium
Violoncellist, and
" a ,hr - 1 y a
Accompanist
Sun., March 22, 4:15, Mendeksohn Theater
Violinist, and
Pianist, in Sonata Recital
Sun., March 29, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theater
Pianist
Sun., April 5, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theater
Violonist, and
LOUISE NELSON, Piainist in Sonata Recital
Sun., April 26, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theater
SCHOL OFMUSI TRD

314 South State St.

Phone 6615

P.UA. HAD ER
Technical Illustrations

COMI

[LETE DRAFTING
gpl vTCE

Wassily Besekirsky
Violinist
Tosenh Brinkman

Hanns Pick
Violincellist

II

v

I

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