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March 10, 1931 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-03-10

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T THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 1931

MQ| S WILL PL|DISPL AY IN ARCHITECTURAL BUI LDING
SrEPRESENTS VARIED PHASES OF ART

I1Ae;s From Other Colle es I

FNI LM LA L A collection of models, plans, and C
specimens representing the various

phases of art is presented in the

t

Leader of Clevelanders Engaged
to Give Music at Senior

]
ti

Law Class Function.1
Griff Morris, youthful leader of
radio station WJAY's Clevelanders,
has been engaged for the twenty-
seventh annual Crease dance, pre-
mier social function of the senior
law class, which will be held Fri-
day night, March 27, in the Law-
yers club, it was announced yes-
terday by Theodore C. Baer, '31L,
general chairman of the commit-
tee for the dance.
Forthe last two years, Morris has
been entertaining with his band
over the Cleveland radio station
and, during this time, has become
one of the feature attractions of
the broadcasts from this station.
Before entering the field of radio
entertaining, he was a headliner on
the Radio-Keith-Orpheum Vaude-
ville circuit.
In London, Morris has appeared
at the Kit-Kat club and at the ex-
clusive Trent club. He brings his
entire band to the Crease dance.
A few tickets are still available
for the dance but only to seniors in
the Law school, Baer said. Only 120
tickets will be sold.
The invitations for the affair are
in the form of court summons to
the "Supreme Crease Court in and
for the County of Ecstacy, State of
Crease," and will be mailed to the
women guests.
DFNE I S ARIN
Defense Minister Scores France
for Creating Greater
War Machine.

lobby and corridors of the Archi-
tectural building as an inspiration
to the student artists and archi-
tects who frequent the place. f
In the lobby on the first floor of
the building is to be seen an ex-
tensive collection of busts, models
of buildings, bas-reliefs, wall pla-
ques, and various statues. The or-s
iginals represent the work of some
of the world's best sculptors. The
others are the replicas of famous
SHL'L !AeS
First YP'ar Scholcst c Average{
a:ges etween and C,
Registrar Shows.
Freshman scholastic averages for
the first semester of 1930-31 range
a little below the half way mark
between a B and a C, according to
data taken from the freshman
scholastic reports circulated by the
office of the registrar among all
high schools from which students
have entered the University.
Only one course, Education 41b
had an average below C, while Geo-
logy 1, Chemistry 1, and Mathe-
matics 5 and 8 had just a C aver-
age. Education F5a and F5b, as well
as Greek 31, were the three courses
with averages higher than B.
After each semester the fresh-
man scholastic records are com-
piled and returned to the high
schools from which they entered.
More than 500 schools received re-
ports at the end of this semester,'
thus giving them an ample basis
upon which to determine just how
their students fared after recom-
mendation, as well as showing what
courses such students were defi-
cient in.
Although the University under
the direction of Ira M. Smith, regis-
trar, has sponsored such a policy
for the last several years, at the
annual meeting of the North Cen-
tral association of colleges and sec-
ondary schools, a resolution was
adopted whereby this became a
regular policy among all higher
institutions of learning in the asso-
ciation.
Not only is the average student
grade report sent out, but the
marks, hours, courses pursued, and
credit received by each individualj
student is also sent to the high
school from which he entered the
University.
Conservation Council j
to Study Land Taxes

Greek statuary. The buildigs rep- L
resent the forms of architecture as
e vdenced in some of the leading
C cago and Detroit structures. HOLD IN DEBATES
The bas-reliefs and wall piaques LOYOLA UNIVERSITY-Members
are replicas of the Greeks and Ro- of the debating team are partici-
man work. In the center of the pating in an extensive tour of 17
floor of the room is the seal of the eastern colleges in an 18-day peri-
University in yellow and blue. od. The subjects for debate are free
In the corridor of the first floor trade, unemployment insurance,
are a number of cases which con- and, in one instance, "Women in
tain objects purchased several years Public Life."
ago from the Havemeyer collection.
Tiles, panels, oriental boe> and IACE iN NIGHTSIRTS
cases, statuettes, and curious small 01I10 S T A T E UNIVERSITY -
objects of art are centaied in Reccs in nightshirts by nine per-
these cases. , c* q

~- ---- I
be held directly responsible for any
disturbances, such as snowballing
and riots, caused by the members
of their respective houses.
Daily Official Bulletin

(Continued from Page 8)
Ueath Penalty: Professor H. R.
Coffey, Dr. B. Jimenez, and Dr. F.
S. Onderdonk will talk on "Do we
need the death penalty?" Friday,
March 13, at 4:15, in Natural
Science auditorium. Professor Ar-
thur E. Wood will preside. Oppor-
tunity for discussion will be given.

Some of the non interesting of!
these are a Chinese lacquer and
mother-of-pearl gift box, a San
T'sai pottery statuette, and a sculp-l
ture limestone buddhaistic statu-
ette. Also included in this collec-
tion are- plates, jars, and plaques
gathered from Italy and the East.
Fragments of famous buildings of
Europe are also exhibited in this
corridor, some of them being one
from the Rouen cathedral which
was a gift from the French govern-
ment and a fragment from the
Saint Maclow cathedral in Rouen,'
also a present from the French
government. Spanish capitals and
capitals from a New York church
are also included.

spu ngpo es o:s featured the
events of the annual Ohio State
tnivorsity livestock show. The ob-
ject of the race was to mount a
horse at one end of the arena and

f
7
I,

at a given signal ride to the other Nursery Section of the Facult
end, jump from the horse, don asy'F y
nightshirt, mount the horse, and Women's Club will meet at the
,ide kT iMichigan League, Thursday, March
ack. The winning .professor12a8o'lc.D..W.Bni?
presented with a pair of pa- 12, at 8 o'clock. Dr. R. W. Bunting
jamas, the runner-up winning the willspeak on "The Care of Chil-
night shirts used in the race. dren s Teeth.
WEADS .ESPONSiBLE Garden Section of the Faculty
Women's Club will meet at Palmer
THE DAILY NORTHWETERN- Field House at 3 p. m., Wednesday,
The Inter-fraternity council decid- March 11. Mr. Guegelman of the
ed at its last meeting that the pres- Wayside Gardens, Mentor, Ohio,
idents of the various houses will will speak.
NORMAN A. WOOD HAS ADVENTUROUS
LIFE AS MUSEUM CURA TOR OF BIRDS

By M. F.
fl Directing an expedition which
numbered among its members Alex-
_,w)s one of numerous adventures of
Distinguished Canadian Soldier Norman A. Wood, curator of birds
of the museum of zoology, and for
Named Dominion Minister 36 years a member of the University
to United States. museums faculty, which he recalled
yesterday when questioned about
(ly Assocueda Press) the research expeditions recently
OTTAWA, Ont., March 9.-When sent to Isle Royale to investigate
William D. Herridge becomes do- the living conditions of animals
minion minister at Washington, and bird life.
both Canada and the United States The serial photography of the
will have distinguished soldiers in 45-mile-long island in northern
each other's capitals. Michigan awakened memories -of
Maj. Herridge served in the front his trips there when its woods were
line during the World war and re- virgin to the investigations of the
ceived the Military Cross and Dis- white man. "Daddy" Wood, as he is
tinguished Service Order for con- called by museum associates, had!
spicuous bravery in action. Han--__

charge of the expedition to Isle
Royale in 1904, for which President
Ruthven served as scientific direc-
tor, and Dr. Max Peet, now profes-
sor of neuro-surgery in the Univer-
sity hospital, studied the migration
of birds.
After a stay at Stobin Harbor in
1907 with his wife, he remained
away from his favorite wild haunts
until last summer, when he corn-
pleted a study of the birds of the
island. Conducting investigations at
both Fish Island and Birch Isle,
where he was guided by the Indian
proprietor of the land, "Daddy" has
completed a report for the Michi-
gan state survey that describes
more than 170 species of winged
creatures that are inhabiting, or
have inhabited the island.

ford MacNider, minister to Ottawa,
was a lieutenant colonel in France,
earning numerous citations, and
later became comander of the
American Legion.
Premier R. B. Bennett announced
the appointment of Maj. Herridge,
a close personal friend and legal
adviser, Saturday night and King
George gave formal approval. He
is expected to assume his duties
within two months, succeeding Vin-
cent Massey. resigned.
The new Envoy is in his early for-
ties, is a widower and a lawyer.
He has had wide contacts with
American businers men and attor-
neys in arguing patent and corpor-

.a____ ..___.__. ___. , ....

-- i

r{ation cases before the highlest
Various forestry problems now courts of the dominion. He aided
before the state legislature will be Mr. Bennett in the recent campaign
considered when the Michigan Con- that overthrew the Liberal govern-
servation council meets March 18 ment of Premier MacKenzie King.

in Ann Arbor as a result of a spe-
cial session of the executive com-
mittee of the organization which
met yesterday noon at the Union.
According to the statement of
Prof. S. W. Allen, of the forestry
department, secretary of the coun-
cil, there are many problems rela-
tive to the taxing of forest lands
that will be considered at this time.
Auther W. Stace, of Ann Arbor, is
the president of the council.
BRIGHT SPOT
802 PACKARD ST.
TODAY, 11:00-1:30
SAUSAGE AND EGGS WITH
POTATOES O'BRIEN
25c

-LAST TIMES TODAY
I55 11 " Helen
WEDNEsAvetr
WEDNESDAY

1931
The hit of hits. For surpassig all pre-
vious Junior Girls' plays. Never has the
campus been portrayed so vividly.

5:30 to 7:30
BAKED CALVES HEART
VEAL ROSETTES
LAMB CHOPS
BAKED VIRGINIA HAM
POT ROAST OF BEEF WITH
NOODLES AND VEGETABLES
BAKED IDAHO OR SWEET
POTATOES
CARROTS, PEAS OR SPINACH
35c

11

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WE DELIVER

PHONE 8241

Ib

'V
h

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Joan Crawford
in her most dramatic romance! b

PRI .ES

li

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e

Fools

of the stage success by
Sir Gerald Du Maurier
and Viola Tree
with
LOIS
MORAN
Walter Byron
Phillips Holmes
EXTRA
Andy Clyde
"DON'T BITE YOUR DENTIST"

First Eight Rows.
(Blocks of 15 or more $2.00)
Remaining First Floor

Balcony

. . $1.50

$2.50
$2.00

Last Three Rowas

$100

,Dance"

Back of the front page underworld drama, beautiful Joan crashes to as
exciting a climax as the screen has shown! Gun-play! Gals! Heart-throbs!

Lydia MENDELSSOHN TheatreII

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