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March 07, 1931 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-03-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SATURDAY, MARCH 7,- 1931

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rAGE PTVY

SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 1931 PAGE FIV!

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PLAY RHEAR9SALS
MUST BE ATTENDED
Absentees From Cast or Chorus
Practices Will be Dropped
From Play.
ONLY ILLNESS EXCUSED
Dress Rehearsals Will be Held
Next Friday and Saturday
Nights.
Beginning Monday, any member
of the cast or choruses of "Came
the Dawn," the 1931, Junior Girls'
Play, who is absent from a rehear-
sal will be dropped from the play.
The only exceptions will be those
students who are excused by Amy
Loomis, director of the play, be-
cause of illness. Any one who is ill
and does not notify Miss Loomis
will be subject to the same penalty.
"These stringent measures are
necessary," claims Miss Loomis,
"because attendance at rehearsals
hias been. exceptionally poor this
year. Fines for tardiness to rehear-
sals will be strictly imposed next
week."
Dress rehearsal nights are to be
Friday and Saturday of next week.
The play will open Monday, March
16 with the traditional Senior Night,
and will continue for a week's run,
,with a matinee Saturday, March 21.
Tickets will be available to the
general public at the box office of
the Lydia Mendelssohn theatre
from 10 to 7 o'clock every day for
the next two weeks. For the past
week' mail orders have been the
only way in which rservations have
been made.
Senior women should present
their Senior Supper tickets at the
box office'in the Lydia Mendelssohn
theatre not later than 7 o'clock
Thursday, March 12, in order to
get their seats for the Play. Only
balcony seats will be sold to out-
'siders-Monday night, and no men
are to be permitted to attend the
performance.
: Because of the nature of "Came
the Dawn," a. Faculty night has
been planned for Tuesday, March
'1..-As usual, Fraternity and Soror-
ity night will be Friday, March 20,
and, Alumni night on Saturday.
MISS M'CORMICK
SPEAKS AT HALLS

_ __
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LEADING
ENGLISH

LADY FOR
PLAYERS

- ~ ---~ .-~--
Muriel Hutchison,
Repertory Company
Satisfies Ambitions
of Visiting Actress
Small and earnest and very Eng-
lish is Muriel Hutchinson, leading
lady of the Ben Greet English Play-
ers. She stood in the doorway of
her room, and after a perilous
ascent in the doubtful splendor of!
the lift of the hotel, her invitation'
to enter was more than welcome.
Her enthusiasm rose above the
erratic diagonal pattern of the rug,
and the chaste blue outlines of the
cuspidor, which were the room's
chief decorations. "Lady Macbeth
is my favorite character by far,"
she stated, "and while the contiast
between her role and the one of
Viola is very great, I enjoy the
opportunity for versatility which
they present."
"Traveling with a reportory com-
pany is the very best way of seeing
the world," she declared. "I have
been able to satisfy my two ambi-
tions of traveling and acting by
combining them. We' not only have
the satisfaction of carrying the
inspiration of Shakespeare where
people are literally thirsting for it,
but we have the chance of seeing
life in foreign countries at first
hand."
Miss Hutchinson has visited Asia,
Africa, Australia, and America
while traveling with Shakespear-
ean and George Bernard Shaw
troups.

MUSIC IN PLAY
WI[ 6[| 9H11|
WILBE VARIED
'Came the Dawn' Will Present
Nineteen Songs of Two
Distinct Types.
"From the total of nineteen songs
which are to be presented in 'Came
the Dawn! '," says Katherine Sit-
ton, chairman of music for the
Junior Girls' Play, "we hope that
there will be some which will at-
tain the popularity which has been
accorded to songs from plays of
past years."
There are two types of music be-
ing used in the play this year. The
original manuscript, written by
Jeannie Roberts and Donna Jones,
contained a number of lyrics after
the manner of Gilbert and Sulli-
van, which were so necessary to
the play, that the music to which
they have been set also posseses
the characteristics which are part
of the comic opera music of these
two English writers.
"The second type of music," to
quote Miss Sitton, "is the kind
which is hummed and whistled by
the audiences as they leave the
theatre. The dance tunes are as
' catchy' as the tunes of the popu-
lar music of the day, and the songs
of the various characters are ser-
ious or comic, as the occasion de-
mands."
"Most of the music in 'Came the
Dawn!,' added Miss Sitton, has been
written by Ruth Allison, Burnette
Bradley, Emily Randall, and Gwen-
dolyn Zoller, all members of the
music committee."
A great many of the songs which
are sung in the dormitories and
sorority houses on campus are or-
iginally from Junior Girls' Plays.
"My Michigan," one of the best
known, comes from "Becky Be-
have," which was presented in 1926,
and directed by Amy Loomis, who
is directing "Came the Dawn."
"Eight 'til Eight," given in 1927,
provided the campus with a song
by that name, and also with "Helen,
I Love you," and "A Little College
is a Dangerous Thing."
It is not necessary to have been
in "Forward March" to know the
theme song from that Play, which
was presented in 1928. "Right Out
of Heaven" was its name, and
"Paris Bound," from the same year
is a close second in popularity.

WOMEN TO TPY
CHANGE IN CAM

AlumnaeG'uests Are Entertained
V at Various Functions

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DZ- -1 1 "F - - -11

of Houses.

I

Imnerciass askebaz I e ea m s
Plan New Method of Formal initiations have been the
main social event at the majority'
Starting Play. of sorority houses this week. Fol-
lowing the rituals, each sorority
Next week, during the last round I asnhonoredits newly-initiated
of the interclass tournament, a new members with a formal banquet
system of playing basketball will for which lovely appointments of
be tried. spring flowers or roses and match-
ing tapers have been most popular.
The center forwards will not jump Many alumnae from nearby cities
for the ball as they have in the have been present for the occasion.
past; rather the ball will be given Alpha Gamma Delta is planning
to the center on one of the teams to initiate six women this morning.
at the opening of the game and They are Mary Alexander, '34, Bat-
tle Creek; Evelyn Jones, '32, De-
while standing in the center circle, troit; Mary Ellen Hall, '34, Ann Ar-
she will be permitted to throw it bor, Ruth Neville, '34, Kenawee, Ill.;
to any other player on her team. Barbara Nelson, '34, Ann Arbor;
There are two systems of doing iEllen Kean, '34, Port Huron.
this and it has not yet been decid- The newly initiated members will
ad which method will be followed be honored guests at a luncheon
here. One way is for the centers Saturday noon at Foster's tea room
to toss to see which one gets the jand a formal banquet will be given
ball first and then during the game, for them in the evening. Red and
the team which did not make the yellow roses and green tapers are
last scoring points will be given the to be used on the tables at the ban-
ball as is done in speedball. quet. Mrs. Robert Taylor, of Toledo,
The othei system is to give the an alumna of the sorority, is to be
ball first to one center and then to a guest.
the other regardless of which team Pledges of Delta Delta Delta are
made the last points. i to be entertained Saturday night
Abolishing the jump center is a by the actives at a slumber party.
new custom which has not been Breakfast will be served to them
tried before, but the National Com- Sunday morning. About sixteen
mittee on Basketball Rules hasre- guests will be present.
quested several colleges to try it Seven members of the faculty'
out to see whether or not it will be were dinner guests of Kappa Delta
successful. Thursday evening. Prof. Arthur E.
Wood and Mrs. Wood, Prof. Arthur
University Hospita Aiton and Mrs. Aiton, Prof. John L.
Brumm and Mrs. Brumm, and Mr.
Uses Sales-Coupons Ulendorf were those present.
Initiation is to be held this after-
The Red Arrow money that the noon at the Kappa Delta house and
University collects in it various will be followed by a formal ban-
purchases goes to the social service quet in honor of the new members.
department of the University Hos- Those being .initiated are Alice
pital, according to Miss Ketcliam, Goodenow, '34Ed, Detroit; Elizabeth
who is at the head of that work. Cooper, '34Ed, Washington,' D. C.;
"With the first Red Arrow money Dorothy Cummings, '32, Pontiac;
that was given us, we won a hair- Harriet Jennings, '31, Detroit; Mar-
dryer," said Miss Ketcham." It has garet Cole, '34, Detroit; Dorothea
been a sourse of great convinence Ann Williams, '34, York, Pa; Helen
to the patients in the convalescent Scott, '34, Rochester; Geraldine
ward where we placed it. Our next Grover, '32Ed, Detroit; Katherine
Red Arrow purchase was a small Moore, '33, Grosse Point; and Mrs.
child's play wagon, which will go Clara LasJecquette, Colorado.
to the social hygiene ward" Miss May Youngberg, Evanston,
"A subscription [o the Sat-urdlay Ill., national inspector of Zeta Tau
Evening Post which we w-n will Alpha, is a guest at the local chap-
go to the cases which mast remain ter house this week-end. A formal
for a long tine in the hospital, con- dinner was given in Miss Young-
tinued Miss Ketcham." berg's honor last night at which
the Ann Arbor alumnae were guests.
Predatory animal bounties paid The sorority entertained five guests
by Montana last year totaled $9,336. at a rushing dinner Tuesday night.

Alpha EpsilonhPhi initiated six
women last night: Natalie Arden,
'33, Detroit; Ruth Cohn, '34, De-
troit; Georgia Geisman, '34, Nor-
wich, N.Y.; Jacqueline Navran, '34,
Kansas City, Missouri; Gertrude'
Rush, '34, Detroit, and Elaine Sles-
singer, '34, Detroit. A formal din-
ner was given in honor of the ini-
tiates.
Sunday afternoon members of
the sorority will entertain guests
at tea from three to five o'clock.
Chi Omega announces the pledg-
ing of Dorothy Coll, '32, of Detroit,
and Gwendolyn Zoller, '32, of Ann
Arbor.
STUDENTS RESIDE
IN PRACTICE HOME
Women at University of Kansas
Try Practical Experiment.
Four women students in the de-
partment of economics at the Uni-
versity of Kansas are living in a
practice home management house
for the first six weeks of this sem-
ester.
These four students assume all
the responsibility of the house. The
duties are divided between them
and thy are shifted throughout the
six weeks period so that each
woman practices every phase of
the work.
The house has been adopted as
a laboratory course to accompany
the course in home administration.
Fifty vacant houses and two
Negro churches have vanished in
Birmingham, Ala., having been
carried away a few pieces at a time
for fuel.

INITIATION AND BANOUETS MARK
SOCIETY OF WEEK AT SORORITIES

GROUP WILL HEAR
PROFESS'OR SPEAK
Katherine Greene Will Address
Education Club on 'The
Pre-School Child'.
Members of the Women's Educa-
tion Club will meet Monday after-
noon, March 9, at 4 o'clock in the
parlors of the Women's Athletic
building. Dr. Katherine Greene,
professor of psychology of educa-
tion, will speak on "The Pre-scliool
Child." All women interested in ed-
ucation are cordially invited to at-
tend this meeting.
The last meeting of the Women's
Education club was held February
16, in the Cave of the Michigan
League. Tea was served, and pro-
gram on schools of other countries
followed. Miss Antoinette SooHoo,
Grad., discussed schools in China;
Vera Dobroudjanska, Grad., de-
scribed schools of Bulgaria; Agnes
Johnson, '31, spoke on French
schools; and the Delaware Plan for
Junior Year Abroad, was outlined
by Elizabeth Howard, '31.
Professor of English
Will Address Society
Dr. Clarence Thorpe, professor of
English, will speak before a meet-
ing of Mummers at 4 o'clock next
Thursday afternoon in the League
building. His subject is to be "Sal-
vaging the Theatre" and will in-
clude the trends of the modern
theatre.
This is to be an open meeting
_and all who are interested are
cordially invited to attend.

~-~~~-

Among the Best and at
Reasonable Prices
FREEMANS

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DINING

ROOM

Lunches 40c, Dinners 60c
Sunday Dinner 75c
ONLY ONE BLOCK NORTH FROM IILL AUDITORIUM

Interest in Fencing Has Grown in Past
Few Years', Says Coach John Johnstone

i,, ___ ____ ___ __ _ _ . ___._._____ _ __,_ _ _._._... _ __ ._ _ _
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Tells Students to Have as Many
Experiences as Possible.
"Learn everything you can, have
every experience possible, and make
all the contacts with other people
for which you have the opportun-
ity," stated Miss Ethel McCormick
social director in the of fce of the
Dean of women, in a talk Thurs-
day at Mosher-Jordan halls. "These
are the things to do throughout
your life."
"If you really are alert, that is
the thing that counts," said Miss
McCormick commending the Mich-
igan women for their unusual exe-
cutive ability.
tn discussing new careers for wo-
mIen, Miss McCormick said that
there are many positions open to
college graduates as hostesses in
the better hotels and summer re-
Sorts, in conducting tours abroad,
in being hostesses on the trans-At-1
lantic boats, and in being social di-
rectors at colleges. She said that
the qualifications for this sort of
work are "to be interested, interest-
ing, sincere, and charming."
Miss McCormick herself has a
unique position at the University,
as she was made social director for
women this year. This office was
created with particular regard fort
the women who live in the league
houses.

onege an riigI nacnUU A dsave
Introduced Sport as Part
of Health Program.
"Interest in fencing has been
growing slowly but steadily," said
John Johnstone, supervisor of phys-
ical education and coach of fenc-
ing, who is instructing the recent-
ly formed fencing class for women
students. "The interest, naturally,
is in fencing as a sport, not as a
means of self-defense against en-
emies nor as a means of vindicating
one's 'honor'."
"The last war, of course, gave
some impetus because of natural
association,"he continued, "but the
present interest comes both from
the sport and the health factor.
Colleges, and more recently high
schools, have b e e n introducing
fencing as a varsity and intramural
sport."
"The sport side will be with us
as long as fiction is written and

read and dramas are portrayed,"
he stated. Mr., Johnstone called at-
tention to the fact that the litera-
ture of the last three hundred years
is filled with fencing bouts. In
reading Shakespeare and the other
Elizabethans, Dumas, Scott, and
Stevenson, one "finds pages filled
with the ring of steel;" and "when
he turns to Sabatini for modern
fiction he again is thrilled by the
brave deeds accomplished by the
sword."
"But fencing," Mr. Johnstone em-
phasized, "has another factor that
gives it real validity in a physical
education program; health! It
gives excellent co-ordination of
body and develops harmony in the
physical organism. Furthermore,"
he added, "investigation shows that
it is extremely beneficial as a cor-
rective and reducing exercise and
consequently it is an ideal sport
not only for men and boys but for
women and girls also."
S tnnin
styles
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75

SPRIG

OPENlP4G

SALES

MACK'S ENTIRE COLLECTION

Clearance of
FRENCH ROOM FORMAL

Robes

add-kd

r~

1'
r~
I.'

WATER SNAKE
' y~'' oS:;'">i

Values
to $25.00
"A thing of beauty is a
oy forever"---and you'll
agree with Keats, when
you gaze at the smiling
picture of loveliness in
one of the long mirrors
in the French Room,
and realize with a shock
that it is your humble
self, and that the price
of this is so small in

Footwear

for

Negligees

/3 Less
NEGLIGEES
10.00 to $25.00
Values
/3 less
Lacy, delicately colored negli-
gees of crepe de chine and
satin crepe, fitted in becoming
princess lines. These bits of
loveliness come in o r c h i d,
peach, green, apricot, or blue.
KIMONAS
$2.95 to $25.00
Values
Y3 less
Every kind of kimona, whether
it be gaily flowered or stun-
ningly hand embroidered-all
reduced to clear. Also some
3-piece pajamas suits in this
group.

t4
t
e
.
a- w

"Read this letter first,"
says OLD HAMPSHIRF
STATIONERY
when it makes its appearance from
the postman's bag - and a fine
appearance it makes too. For Old
Hampshireis notably good looking
stationery. It has quality, character,
suEstance--there is something
about its crispness, its rich texture,
that tends to make even the dullest
letter seem positivey eloquen'.
miur IiF~'rnnt

Spring!I
Choose from blonde kid . .
sea-sand kids . . . reptiles .. .
black kids . . . black moires
... blue kids . . . and others.

comparison as to
nominal. They come
all the pastel shades,
bTack,rin white and
deep redl.

be
in
in
in

s

to

S8

MATERIALS:
SATIN
TAFFETA
NET
Lvening Wraps,
Values to $45.00
$24.50

Lounging Robes
Originally $6.95 to $17.50
1/.I I

1 9.1"'T±1./ 1

U I it'MI!~l~~~I rs~~3 U

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