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March 07, 1931 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-03-07

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FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 1931

p ~ I

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Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
in this paper and the local news published,
herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann *Arbor,
Mehigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail, $4.50.
Offices- Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard
Street. Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
Chairman Editorial Board
HENRY MERRY
FRANK E. COOPER, City Edior
N~ews Editor .............Gurney Williams
Editorial Director ..........Walter W. Wilds
Sports Editor........... .Joseph A. Russell
Women's Editor.........Mary L. Behymer
Music, Drama, Books.........Wm. . Gorman
Assistant City Editor.......Harold O. Warren
Assistant News Editor......Charles R. Sprowl
Telegraph Editor ..........Geore A. Stater
Copy Editor.HE.............W..Pypet
NIGHT EDITORS

S. .each Conger
Carl S. Forsythe
David M. Nichol

John D. Reindel
Charles R. Sprowl
Richard L. Tobin
Harold O. Warrea

SPORTS ASSISTANTS
Sheldon C. Fullerton T. Cullen Kennedy
Charles A. Sanford
REPORTERS

Thomas M. Cooler
Morton Frank
Saul Friedberg
F'rank B. Gilbretk
ck Goldsmith
oland Goodman
orton Helper
J ames _Johnson
Bryan Jones
Denton C. Kunz*
Eileen Blunt
Nanette Dembit
Elsie Feldman
Ruth Gallineyer
Emily G. Grimes
ean Levy
coon Magee
Susan Manchester

Powers Moulton
WilburJ. Meyers
Brainard W. N ies
Robert L. Pierce
Richard Racine
erry E. Rosenthal
arlSeiffert
George A. Stauter
John W. Thomas
John S. Townsend
Mary McCall
Cile Miller
Margaret O'Brien
Eleanor Rairdon
Anne Margaret Tobin
Margaret Thompson
Claire Trussell

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2121.
T. HOLLISTER MABLEY, Business Manager
$ASrasf f. HALVERSON, Assistant MGnapg~f
DEPARTMENT MANAC.ERs
AdvertisingE.............Charles T. Kline
Advertising..............Thomas M. Davis
Advertising..........William W. Warboys
Service..........Norris 3. Johnsn
Publication ............Robert W.Williamson
Circulation.............Marvin S. Kobacker
Accounts ............... homas S. Muir
Business Secretary..........Mary J. Kenan
Assistants

assistance of a cabinet, consisting
of the heads of departments, as
well as administrative committees,
each of whom is responsible for
the proper administration of his
particular function. Functionally
independent units have been set
apart, there has been a general de-
fining of responsibilities according1
to their departments, and when the
necessity arises there will probably
be an. even greater separation of
powers and definition of duties, re-
taining those of general policy and
broader questions in the President's
office.
This much for the administrative
machinery in general. In its rela-
tion to the students, no particular
reforms have been innovated, the
present ones having undoubtedly
been considered sufficient. A sec-
ond reform, perhaps more vital and
pertinent to a certain group of stu-
dents, was introduced last year,
namely deferred rushing. Statistics
have shown that students entering
colleges and universities today are,
on the average, younger than fresh-
men of the past. They are held to
be in need of more expert advice
more guidance and assistance in
making their decisions than the
entering students of ten or fifteen
years ago. It is hoped that the old
system of "hot-boxing," and strong-
arming will be eliminated by the
provisions of this new ruling, which,
however, has only provided the
basic legislation for the proposed
scheme. The details have yet to
be worked out in a satisfactory
manner, which can be done only'
after a survey has been made of
rthe results of several years under
)he new experiment.
The above two propositions have
dealt with the University in itself,
and its relation with the students.
A third point remains, its relations
with the outside world. In an at-
tempt to further the contact of the
institution with other centers of
learning, or people interested in
educational methods, the establish-
ment of a committee for a Uni-
versity press has been authorized.
Larger Eastern universities all have
their own presses, publishing the
latest scholarly treatises on current
problems, written by members of
their own faculties. Previous to the
authorization of this committee,
the only contact the University had
with outsiders was through the
small bulletins published from time
to time, containing mostly infor-
mation as to academic matters, a
few professorial works, and reports
of conventions; the broadcasting
studio, and the extension service.
The expansion of these methods
If bringing the University before
the public, are however, limited.
Professors who have written vol-
umes, both of popular interest as
well as textbooks, have had them
solicited from outside publishers.
With proper appropriations, this
new administrative committee will
be able to establish a press to care
for all the University printing, as
well as publish from time to time
books in the academic field by au-
thorities, an undertaking which will
greatly enhance the academic re-
putation of Michigan. The report
augurs well for the future, yet does
fot lead to too great hopes and
2xpectations such as might be en-
ertained for a privately-endowed
nstitution.
It would be hard to say who the

new president of the council of
-ommissars in Russia is, the name
given in the cables being Viacheslav
Mihailovich Molotov.
-Ihtro News
Eugene O'Neill's new play will
,)ke three nights to perform. Mr.
-'Neill is probably the first Ameri-
)an who ever wrote a Chautauqua.
--Detoit A rz '

arry R. Begle
ernon Bishop
William Brown
Robert Callahan
William W. Davis
Richard H. Hiller
Miles Hoisington
Ann W. Verner
Marian Atran
Helen Bailey
,J osephine Convissut
axine Fishgrund
Dorothy LeMire
Dorothy Laylin

t

Erle Kightlinger
Don W. Lyon
William Morgan
Richard Stratemelet
Keith TI-fer
Noel U. "1"rner
Byrou C. Veddet
Sylvia Miller
Helen Olsen
Mildred Postal'
Marjorie Rough
Mary E. Watts
Johanna Wiese

SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 1931
Night Editor - JOHN D. REINDEL1

OATED ROLL
INTERFRATERNITY
QUILTING BEE
GOES ON RECORD
as saying something for the first
time since its inception nobody
cares how many years ago. Having
put off for a number of years the
minor considerations of deferred
rushing and fraternity drinking
and disturbing the peace until theE
faculty finally was forced to stept
in and save Michigan from becom-
ing the playground of a nation, this
august body has stepped boldly
forth and committed itself at last.
* * *
I like their fine humanitarian
spirit, though. It took the cry-
ing needs of the innocent
pledges-who don't have to1
join fraternities if they don't
want to undergo some slightt
castigation for the good of their
souls-to arouse the boys from!
their stentorian slumbers and
get them to make statements
to the effect that no more may
a neophyte destroy property or,
public disturbances (see word-
ing of notice) without getting
his house into perfectly terrible
trouble with the all-powerful
Interfrat Nonentity Assn.
I prophesy that this ruling will
result in a concerted effort on the
part of humorous-minded pledges
to destroy all the property and pub-
lic disturbances they can lay hands
on just to see the fun. I wish I were
a pledge.
* * *
CONTRIBUTION
Dear Danny:
Fer gawd's sake do something!
about this in your colyum-rise up
in arms-or don't rise up in arms-
but do something! Save the loyal
sons of good old Michigan from
further extortion! Save them from
the dastardly curse of these here
motion picture slickers! Save them
-Save them from Clara Bow!!
Na poleon and Joan of Arc and
me are all martyrs; we died for a
cause, but not in vain. WE SAVED
THE PEOPLE! Well, maybe I didn't
die, but I dam (add n) near did
watching that Bow hussy "stage her
comeback." Oh, I tell you it was
agony. She wasn't bad-no sir, not
by a darn sight. She was lousy.
Yours for annihilation of-of-I
shudder at the name-Clara Bow!
Smulch.
* * *
Dear Smulch:
I am deeply grieved to have
to tell you that it is against the
Daily policy to print anything
that could antagonize our ad-
vertisers in any way. You may
have noticed the reviews of
movies now and then. Hence,
disloyal as it may seem to me,
I cannot do as you suggest and
start a campaign. I cannot even
tell you that I would like to
start one, or how much in sym-
pathy I am with what you say.
A martyr to mammon and a
traitor to my art I remain,
Very Very sincerely Your
Poignant
DAN BAXTER.
S* * *
,Dear Dan:
Amid the shouts and bustlings of
those attending the uplift move-
ment at Barbour Gym the other
night the following came to my ears
wafted gently through the din like
one clear g-minor chord wrapped
in a yard of pink taffeta.

It seems a certain Betsy Barbour
Flash was selling tickets to the
Chamber of Horrors. She approach-
ed one callow youth and, with a
charming smile, "Won't you buy a
ticket to the Chamber of Horrors?"
quoth she.
"No thanks," came the ready
reply (I suspect he had been hang-
ing around waiting to pull the nifty
for an hour or so) "I've dated most
of them, so to speak, and the nov-
elty has worn off."
A frank statement indeed.
Sleuth.
** *
Dear Sleuth:
Were it not for the ffact that
I have implicit trust in your
veracity I should be strongly
inclined to doubt that pleasant
tale. I would not have believed
that a man so persistent as to
go beyond his first two or three
dates on this campus existed in
these days. A gent that will
pursue futile searches with
single-mindedness like that is
an anachronism (or should I
say katachronism?) . . . What
a team he and Diogenes would
have made in Vaudeville!. . .
Probably singing that old sweet
song "Vaudeville I do When
youooooo Are Far Away?"
As Ever Inconceivably Yours,
Danny.

.. i

USIC AND DRAMA
AS YOU LIKE IT
A Review
One of the most beloved of
Shakespeare's plays received such a
vivacious mounting last night by
Sir Philip Ben Greet and his play-
ers that a capacity audience was on
the point of cheers. "As You Like
It" is Milton's "sweetest Shake-
speare, Fancy's child." The most
ardent Shakesperean would n o t
contend for it as drama. Indeed,
Shakespeare himself by his title
acknowledges unashamedly that he
is writing in the tradition of pas-
toral romance deriving from Lyly,
which precludes any objection to
the motiveless quarrels, motiveless,
reconciliations, transparent d i -
guises etc. These people are in a
world where they "fleet the time
carelessly, as they did in the golden
world" and Shakespeare's limpid,
exquisite poetry and his intellec-
tual agility in combination sustain
this joyful world. The moralizing
of the banished Duke, the skillful
opposition of the melancholy Jac-
ques, the bitter anatomist of life,
and Touchstone, "using his folly
like a stalking horse" affordsan in-
tellectual sub-structure, subtly bear-
ing up the fantasy.
Ben Greet's production-princi-
pally by its speed and the excell-
ence of the reading, which never
once showed by false emphasis that
the speakers knew not of what they
were talking and always displayed
a keen perception of blank verse
values-realized this play almost
Ideally. Sir Philip himself was an
interestin'g Jacques, though his in-
terpretation made him rather too
doddering and amiable and less a
"dark" contrast and less as Hazlitt
saw him, "the only purely medita-
tive character in all of Shake-
speare." Perhaps the outstanding
performance was that given by
Russell Thorndike as Touchstone,
who was able to go the delightful
limit in buffoonery and still com-
municate the clown's unsurpass-
able shrewdness and Shakespeare's
satire through him on the shallow-
n e s s of court convention. Mr.
Thorndike's technicaly agility as an
actor was delight in itself. Rex
Walter's Orlando and Enid Clark's
Celia were alike vivacious and in-
imitable.
But of course, ultimately the
play's fame rests on one of the most
fascinating women in all litera-
ture, the epitome of romantic girl-
hood, alive with a quick charming
humour and suggesting the depths
of womanly instinct. Rosalind, as
it is one of the most grateful, is
one of the most difficult of all act-
ing parts. It requires a sound and
abundant feminine sense of com-
edy. Its difficulty lies in the fact
that it is practically a solo part.
There is no particular strength
given Rosalind's position by any-
thing in the action, even by Or-
lando's love. The actress must rely
on her lyric grace almost entirely.
There must be loads of fun in her
as a personality and there must be
an elaborate technic to concentrate
that personality into iridescent
comedy over a period of three
hours. Slur the values of Rosalind
and probably a whole production
of "As You Like It" becomes tedi-
ous. The part requires genius. I

hope to have suggested the nature
of Miss Hutchinson's achievement
as Rosalind. Her rendering always
had grace, gaiety, tenderness; and
at times, that positiveswitchery of
humour that the best actresses
must have brought to the part.
EU'TROIT THEATERS
A. A. Milne, whom the more naive
'among us know for his amazing,
Pooh Pooh works, may be studied
from a different angle at the De-
troit Cass next week. The airiness'
and conscious good humor of all
his verse, is forsaken here for a
sweetness which drew caustic com-
ment from certain reviewers and
won the hearts and praise of many
others. Which possibly is not say-
ing anything too definite. Which is
a fault.
The play is "Michael and Mary"
which managed to survive the
dreariest dramatic season New York
has seen (last year).
Madge Kennedy who is well
known in Detroit and a competent
actress for all that, plays the Mary.
In different portions of the play she
.appears as "a deserted wife facing
starvation; as the idealistic com-
panion of an aspiring young novel-
ist and finally as the wife of the
writer during a period that brings
them both the jolt of despair and
the glow of happiness."
*' * *

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BROWN-CRESS,
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IN VESTMENT
SECUftITIES
Orders executed on al ex.
changes. Accounts carried
on conservative margin.
Telephone 23271
ANN ARBOR TRUST BLD9.
lit FLOOR

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William Wade Hinshaw
Devoted to Music

601 East William

Phone 7515

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Unexcelled Baldwin Pianos

rI.OL

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Popular Music

FIRST METHODIST
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Cor. S. State and E. Washington Sts.
Dr. Frederick B. Fisher, Minister
10:30 A. M.-Morning Worship.
"CULTURE"

METHODIST STUDENTS
CENTER
WESLEYAN GUILD
Cor. State and East Huron
12:00 Noon-Mrs. Fisher's class in
Comparative Religion.
6:00 P. M.-Devotional Service.
Judge J. G. Pray, subject: "The
Juvenile Court and the Under-
Privileged Child."

i. ,i

L-

THE
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
E. Huron, below State
R. Edward Sayles, Minister
Howard R. Chapman, Minister of
Students.
9:45 A. M.-The Church School.
Mr. Wallace Watt, Superintendent.
10:45 A. M.-Worship and Sermon.
Mr. Sayles will speak on "~Quality
Mindedness."
12:00 Noon-University Students at
Guild House. Mr. Chapman.
5:30 P. M.-Friendship Hour. All
Students invited.
6:30 P. M.-Devotional Meeting.
Mr. Benjamin King (Gin Beh.
Min), will speak on, "Chinese
Family Life." All members sp-,
cially asked to be present.

iI

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7:30 P. M.-Evening
"MYRON HERRICK

Worship.
AND

MODERN FRANCE"
Both sermons by Dr. Fisher

7:00 P. M.-Social Hour.

[1

IN RETROSPECT

The publishing of the President's
report for the year 1929-30 brings
with it the realization that, al-
though school days sometimes drag
long slowl'y, Dr. Ruthven has al-
ready completed a year and a half
in office, and the high points of
the first year of his regime have
been ably listed in the first annual
report.
On the whole, the policy seems
to have been one which will enable
the University to deal with the fu-
ture more effectively than it has
been able to do with the present
idue to the traditional stands of the
past non-corporate University ad-
ministrative methods. The primary
step in the furtherance of this end
has been the adoption of the cor-
poration form of administration.
There has not been a crying need
for a new organization, nor has the
University been in desperate straits
due to the old form of organiza-
tion, but it was recognized that a
growing institution such as the
University would, in the future.
either necessitate an enormous ex-
pansion or else a revision of the
old system. By the latter method,
now adopted, a sharper line has
been drawn between the various ad-
ministrative functions of such a
large organization as the Univer-
ity, and a separation of duties into
their respective departments.
The old system tended too much.
According to the report, toward
centralization of duties and respon-
sibility in one point, namely the
President's office. Many trivial de-
tails, which could have been settled
by deans of colleges or even heads
of departments had to pass through.
the regular red tape process until
It had finally received the approval
of the highest official. This obvious-
ly meant a loss of time, and dupli-
cation of effort and work in inves-
tigating the causes and reasons be-
hind each step. On the other hand,
there were fields which had no defi-
pite status in any department. For
two of them, namely plant exten-
zion, and lands owned for research
and field work, administrative com-
mittees have been appointed which
will take care of University projects

FIRST CONGRE6ATIONAL
CHURCH
Allison Ray Heaps, Minister
Sunday, March 8, 1931
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
First of a series of Lentin sermons.
Subject: "In The Wilderness-A
Study of Temptation."
5:30 P. M.-Student Fellowship.
Prof. Jesse S. Reeves, Ph.D.,
Speaking on "The Wickersham
Report."
FIRST
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division Sts.
Merle H. Anderson, Minister
Alfred Lee Klaer, University Pastor
Mrs. Nellie B. Cadwell, Counsellor of
Women.
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon: "Good Enough for God."
12:00 Noon-Student Classes.
5:30 P. M.-Social Hour for Young
People.
6:30 P. M.-Young People's Meet-
ing Leader: James Spencer on
"Legal Aspects of the Negro Ques.
tion."
ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
Washington St. at Fifth Ave.
E. C. Stellhorn, Pastor
9:00 A. M.-Sunday School.
10:30 A. M.-Morning Service.
Sermon topic: "Does the Savior
Save?"
5:30 P. M.-Studenr Fellowship and
Supper.
6:30 P. M.--Studcnt Forum.
7:30 P. M.-Lenten Service. Ser-
mor, topic: "Delivered to the Gen-
tiles."

hL

i

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F

BE
CONSISTENT
IN
YOUR RELIGION

HILLEL FOUNDATION
615 East University
Rabbi Bernard Heller
11:15 A. M.-Religious Service.
Chapel of Women's League Build
ing. Professor William H. Worrell,
University Department of Semitics,
will speak on "Looking Out of the
Window."
7:30 P. M.-Open Forum. Victor
Aorunin speaking on "Why I Am
a Zionist." 1
9:10 P. M.-Social Hour.

ST. ANDREW'S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division and Catherine Streets
Reverend Henry Lewis, Rector
Reverend Duncan E. Mann, Assistant
8:00 A. M.-Holy Communion.
9:30 A. M.-Church School (Kin-
dergarten at 11 o'clock).
11:00 A. M.-Morning Prayer , ser-
mon by Mr. Lewis.
6:00 P. M.-Student Supper in
Harris Hall, address by Mr. Mann.
7:45 P. M.-Evensong and address
by Mr. Duff. The student choir
will sing "The King of Love My
Shepherd Is," by Shelley as the
Offertory Anthem.

I.7

[t.

BETHLEHEM
EVANGELICAL CHURCH
(Evangelical Synod of N. A.)
Fourth Ave. betwein Packard and
Williams
Rev. Theodore R. Schmale
9:00 A. M.-Bible School.

10:00 A.
Sermon:
ophy of

M.-Morning Worship.
"The Victorious Philos-
Jesus."

:

f--

11:00 A. M.-Service in German.
7:00 P. M. - Young People's
League meeting.
Wednesday Evening at 7:30, Lenten
Service.
LIBERAL STUDENT'S
UNION
7:30 Sunday Evening
"THE PUBLIC AND CRIME"
Wesley H. Maurer,
Dept. of Journalism
Visit a different kind of church
service Sunday morning at 10:45.
Subject for this Sunday-
"IDEALISM IN ITS MATURITY"
at the
Fellowship of Liberal Religion
State and Huron Streets

a

Campus Opinion
Contributo s are asked to be brief,
eoliniog themselvcs to less that. 300
Words if possible. Anonymous corn.
mnications will he disregarded. The
naimes of co~nunicaiits will, however,
be regardedl as confidenti, upon re-
quest. Letters published should, not be
construed as expressing the editorial
opinion of The Daily.
FOOTBALL
An article in the Atlantic Month-
y of this month is headed "Com-
>etition in Education." After hav-
ng dwelt upon the fact that, here-
tofore, whether interested in knowl-
dge or not, every young man or
Homan was admitted to the uni-
rersities, the author points out
That the time is near when the
Nigher institutions of learning must

ATTEND
CHURCH
REGULARLY

11 -

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FIRST CHURCH
CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 S. Division St.
10:30 A. M.--Regular Morning Serv.
ice. Sermon topic: "Man."
11:45 A. M.-Sunday School follow-
ing the morning service.
7:30 P. M.-Wednesday Evening

I1

x
THEOSOPHY
Proves life worth living, by render-
ing it intelligible and demonstrating
the justice and the love which guides
its evolution.

11

ST. PAUL'S LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Third and West Liberty Sts.
C. A. Brauer, Pastor
Sunday, March 8, 1931
Second Anniversary
9:00 A. M.-Special Service in
German.
10:00 A. M.-Bible School.
11:00 A. M.-Special Morning Wor-
ship. The pastor will speak on
"How Amiable Are They Taber-
nacles."
,c.rn f A C - C

,elect,
strong
zbility
;evere
The

i. e., admit only students of
character, unquestionable
and willingness to undergo
intellectual discipline.
conclusion of the article

I .

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