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June 01, 1930 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-06-01

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PAG~E SIX

THE MICHIGAN DATLY

SUNDAT, ~JUXE 1, 1930.

- - ----- -

SPARTAN

NINE

TRI UMPHS

OVER

MICHIGAN;

3-1

WOLERI ES HELD
Kiegler Allows but Seven Hits
But Michigan State Takes
' Lead Early in Game.
RALLY COMES TOO LATE
Michigan State celebrated Me-
morial Day in fitting fashion by
triumphing over their arch-enemy,
Michigan, 3 to 1 in a fast, well-
played game at East Lansing. The
Spartans rode to victory on the
supple left arm of Charley Griffin
who held the Wolverines in check
throughout the contest. The
Wolves were able to solve his deliv-
ery for only two hits, a single by
Superko in the fourth and a double
by Straub in the ninth.
Kiegler also turned in a well-
pitched game, allowing but seven
scattered hits, and was never in
danger after the first two disas-
trous innings when State nicked
him for four hits and three runs.
He set the Spartans down with only
three hits in the next six innings.
Spartans Score ThreeI
In the first frame Gibbs, State
centerfielder, hit a home run with
two out, and the Spartans added
two more in the second on Griffin's
single, Barnard's sacrifice, Pevic's
double, and Knisel's single. Then
with only one out Kiegler caused
Crall to foul to Truskowski and
Cuthbertson to pop to Daniels.a
doubled in the third with one down,
but the next two batters rolled to
the infield, leaving the runner
stranded.
Superko, first upforMichigan in
-the fourth, got a single, but drif-
fin fanned Tompkins and Hudson,
and made Straub fly to Sachs. The
only other times the Wolverines
succeeded in placing men on the
sacks outside of the ninth was in
the first and, fifth. In the first
Superko walked with one away, but
was left there by the next two bat-
ters. In the fifth Myron was safe
when Griffin made a low throw of
his grounder to first. Truskowski
then walked. The next three bat-
ters, however, were retired without
any scoring being done.
Wolverine Rally Halted
In the ninth the Wolverines made 1
a desperate attempt to score. Su-:
perko started off peacefully enough {
by popping to Madonna. Tompkins1
drove a hard grounder at Crall, and
the State first baseman let the ball
gotthrough him into right field,
putting Tompkins on first. Hudson
sent a fly to Gibbs, but Straub
punched a double off the scoreboard
in right scoring Tompkins.
Griffin pitched masterful ball,
fanning nine Wolverine batsmenI
and allowing but one base on balls.{
Tompkins, Daniels and Hudsonl

PLAY BY PLAY ACCOUNT
OF YESTERDAY'S

GAME

CUBS' HITTING
STAR INJURE

FIRST INNING
Wisconsin: Winer was out on a
called strike. Superko threw out
Matthusen. Poser struck out,
swinging. No runs, no hits, no er-
rors.
Michigan: Butler went out at
first, Werner to Mathusen. Superko
walked. Tompkins flied to Poser.
S.uperko stole second, aided by a
poor peg. Hudson drew a base on
balls. Truskowski forced. Hudson
at second. No runs, no hits, no er-
rors.
SECOND INNING
Wisconsin: Ellerman singled to
right. Ellerman stole second. Mit-
tenmeyer singled to left. Myron
threw out Griswold, the runners
holding their bases. Schneider
rolled to Myron and Ellerman was
caught at home, Myron to Trus-
kowski. Werner was out at first,
Compton to Hudson. No runs, two
hits, no errors.
Michigan: Myron singled to right
center. Daniels sacrificed and was
safe when Sommerfield failed to
touch first. Langen fanned. Comp-
ton also struck out. Butler flied to
Poser. No runs, one hit, one error.
THIRD INNING
Wisconsin: Sommerfseld popped
to Daniels. Daniels tossed out
Winer. Matthusen was called out.
No runs, no hits, no errors.
Michigan: Superko fouled to
Schneider. Tompkins flied high to
Poser. Hudson singled to left cen-
ter. Hudson was caught off first,
Sommerfield to Schneider to Wer-
ner. No runs, one hit, no errors.
FOURTH INNING
Wisconsin: Poser fanned on a
called strike. Compton threw out
Ellerman. Mittenmeyer went out
on the same play. No runs, no hits,
no errors.
Michigan: Truskowski was safe
on llerman's high throw. Myron
sacrificed, Matthusen to Schneider.
Daniels flied to Ellerman. Langen
walked. Compton singled to left,
but Truskowski was caught going
home, Poser to Griswold. No runs,
one hit, one error.
FIFTH INNING
Wisconsin: Griswold s i n g 1 e d
through Superko, taking second
when he was hit by Superko's
throw to first, Schneider grounded
to Myron, whose throw caught Gris-
wold going to third. Werner pop-
ped to Daniels. Sommerfield
grounded to Compton. No runs,
one hit, no errors.
Michigan: Butler popped to Pos-
er. Sommerfield tossed out Super-
ko. Tompkins singled to left.
Tompkins was caught stealing sec-
ond, Griswold to Werner. No runs,
one hit, no errors.
SIXTH INNING
Wisconsin: Winner fanned. Mat-
thusen fouled to Superko. Poser
popped to Daniels. No runs, no hits,
no errors.
Michigan: Hudson flied out to
Mittenmeyer. Truskowski singled
to right. Myron drew a walk. Dan-
iels hit into a double play, Mat-
thusen to Schneider. No runs, one
hit, no errors.
SEVENTH INNING
Wisconsin: Ellerman singled to
center. Mittenmeyer sacrificed,
Don Meiklejohn Given
Badger Athletic Medal
(SpcJ al to Ihe Dail )
MADISON, Wis., May 31.-Donald
W. Meiklejohn, '30L&S., was award-
ed the conference medal for pro-
ficiency in athletics and scholarship
in 1930 by the University of Wis-
consin athletic council at its meet-
ing Tuesday.
Meikeljohn, a son of Professor
Alexander Meikeljohn, director of
the university Experimental col-
lege, won three major "W's" in
hockey, serving as co-captain last
season, and earned two junior
"W's" in tennis, in which he was
also a co-captain during the season
just closed.

Compton to Hudson. GriswoldE
singled to left, taking second on theE
throwin. Schneider forced Eller-
man, Compton to Truskowski to
Superko. Werner forced Schneider!
at second. No runs, two hits, no
errors.1
Michigan: Hill batted for Langen)
and was called out. Compton roll-
ed out to Matthusen. Butler flied
out to Winer. No runs, no hits, no
errors.
EIGHTH INNING
Wisconsin: McCormick went to
left field for Michigan. Sommer-
field hit a Texas league double to
left. Winer sacrificed, Compton to
Hudson. Sommerfield stole home.
Matthusen walked. Poser forced
Matthusen at second, Superko to
Daniels. Poser was caught steal-
ing second, Truskowski to Daniels.
One run, one hit, no errors.
Michigan : Superko reached first
on Werner's error. Tompkins sac-
rificed, Sommerfield to Schneider.
Hudson flied to Mittenmeyer, Su-
perko taking third on the throwin.
Truskowski flied out to Winer. No!
runs, no hits, one error.
NINTH INNING
Wisconsin: Ellerman flied to
Tompkins. Hudson put out Mitten-
meyer, unassisted. Griswold sin-
gled to left. Schneider was hit by
a pitched ball. Werner struck out.
No runs, one hit, no errors.
Michigan: Myron fanned, swing-
ing. Daniels popped to Ellerman.
McCormick flied out to Winer. No
runs, no hits, no errors.

SEASON'S LARGEST PLAYER TRADE
D IUL FEATURES DETROIT AND NEW YORK
tS TtSLO Ewr bu t aepaeintem-s./
Indications that several changes Junior circiut for the past two sea-
were about to take place in the ma- sans'.
Sijor leagues, brought about by two Rice is one of the Detroit out-
Athletics Go Into Tie With trades with the Cincinnati Reds and
Washington by Winning New York Giants last week, broke fielders, but enough good gardeners
Third i R out again yesterday when the De- remain on the team so that his loss
Trn ow.troit Tigers swapped three men for will not be felt to any great extent.
S ROBINS BEAT PHILLIES ja pair of players that had been on Westling, a shortstop, was rated
B BI the roster of the New York Yan- lower than both Rogell and Akers
Pi a h bkees. At the same time, the Ath- and can easily be spared, while
Philadelphia, by trimming Wash- letics prepared to cut loose one of Carroll has apparently lost all the
ington for its third time in two the late World Series heroes, while effectiveness he used to possess
days, yesterday went into a tie with two of the biggest stars of the game against opposing batters.
~~~he ~~~~went on the shelf for a two monthagisopsngbte.
the Senators for the leadership of Waite Hoyt, who comes to the
the American League. The Brook- period. Tigers, has not been doing so well
lyn Robins, who went into first Harry Rice, George Westling, and i of late, but he has plenty of stuff
Iplace by winning a double-header Owen Carroll, all members of the and a change of scenery should
from Philadelphia on Decoration Detroit Tigers, will swap uniforms benefit him considerably. Koenig,
Day while the St. Louis Cardinals with Waite Hoyt and Mark Koenig, Yankee shortstop, is better than
were losing two games to Chicago, pitcher and shortstop respectively ieither Rogell or Akers, who are cov-
managed to retain their two game of the Yankees, in the latest deal ering that position now for the Tig-
lead when both teams lost in yes- of the baseball world, and one of ers, and should aid the team great-
terday's competition. I the largest player trades in the ly.
The slugging Robins were unable ;______________________________ ---
to solve the offerings of the youth-
ful Collard and fell before Phila-
delphia in a well played game, 3-1.G NOW I tT
an- The Chicago Cubs came from be- -on all Grey-C
e in hind in the ninth inning to punch -h d I
utthree runs and defeat the Cards V S1 S--
he by a 6-5 score. In the American Thechoice of Universi
nat- League, Rube Walberg pitched the twenty thousand dollar
the Athletics into a tie with Washing- menand leaders. in every
n a ton by limiting the Senators to fivelparlor coaches-uphol- branch of sport. The new
hits and three runs. styles are here for you.
uh ; steredA relnng car

Rogers Hornsby,
Who suffered a fractured left
kle when sliding into third bas
a game against the Cardinals.
veteran is one of the greatestn
ural hitters in the game and
Cubs have been relying on hi
great deal to bring them thro
to another pennant this yearu
his batting and field generals

0

His injury will keep
about two months.

him out

Withl NATIONAl
ship.
for Philadelphia 200
Brooklyn . ... 010

LL LEAGUE
R H
000 001- 3 8
000 000- 1 10

--new

travel comfort

'

Diamond Chatter__

NeW York . . .000
Boston .....001
Cincinnati . .011
Pittsburgh . 002
St. Louis . .. .011
Chicago......000
fMIIA

000
200

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002- 2
00x- 3

H
9
7

Verne Compton, in losing to Wis-- of only five hits, his pitching

r

R H
330 020-10 10
010 100- 4 12
R H
110 100- 5 11
002 013- 6 11

consin, 1 to 0, on Ferry Field yes-
terday, turned in one of the nicestj
pitching exhibitions that hasbeen
seen on the home diamond this sea-
son. The Varsity twirler evidently
has the number of the Badger
sluggers, as he was also the pitcher
that turned them back last week,
10 to 4, in a game at Madison.

was much less spectacular than
that of the Michigan mounds-
man. Compton fanned six op-
ponents, while Sommerfield sent
four Wolverines back to the
bench via the strikeout route.
Myron played a, nice game at
short for the Maize and Blue, kill-

i

-35 direct daily sched-
ules to Chicago, Buf-
falo (new Niagara Falls
runs), New York, Bos-
ton, Pittsburgh, Cin-
cinnati, Indianapolis,
St. Louis, and Cleve-
land-lower fares every
where.
CAMPUS TRAVEL
BUREAU

,rig,

AOak
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AMERICAT
Chicago.....000
St. Louis .. .600
Detroit.....200
Cleveland ...005

NLkAGUE

Get It Back-
And you can do it withgrace
and smart style if you're

R H
010 010- 2 5
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While Sommerfield pitched ing one or two su.re tallies in the
nice ball for the invaders, lim- second inning. After Ellerman and
iting the Wolverines to a total Mittenmeyer had singled to open
the inning, Myron took Griswold's'
MALTESE DEFEAT! grounder and threw him out at first !
on a nice play, holding the runners'
5 0 C C E R ELEVEN on their bases. Schneider, the next
batter, drove a hot one at the Mich-1
igan shortfielder, whose throw toI
Michigan's all-campus soccer Truskowski caught Ellerman trying
team yesterday fell before the hard to score.
driving and great co-ordinating T
play of the Maltese Athletic Club by Te et b it tha have
ibeen so plentiful in the home
a score of 6-2. The Maltese Club, games of late were lacking in
consisting of a squad of picked yesterday's encounter, only one
players, are highly touted for their blow being good for more than
skill in demonstrating how soccer one base
should be played, and yesterday'so
game attracted over 500 spectators A shift in the Wolverine lineup
to South Ferry Field, most of them;that sent Langen to left field in
coming from Detroit.thtsnLngnoletfldiI
The play in the first half of the place of Captain Harvey Straub was
contest clearly showed that the op- necessitated to allow the veteran
ponents certainly knew how to pass W gardener to take an examination.
a soccer ball, keeping the ball! With Straub's additional batting
steadily in Michigan territory. power in the game it is a possibility
Coach Johnstone's organization that Michigan might have scored,
was unable to function properly the Michigan leader heading the
under the well placed drives of the Whole team in the matter of punch-
Maltese aggregation, and the first ing out safe blows, being well up
period ended 3-0 in favor of the among the leading batters of the
Detroiters. 'Conference.

playing your game in a
MA3 at

Washington 020 100 000-
Philadelphia 040 020 1x-

R H
3 5
7 10

Boston ...
New York .

..000 000 110-
..140 000 00x-

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2
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H E
8 0
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Union Side Desk 12-2, 4.6 p. im.
Phone 2-2266 other hours
+ ,f J P

1

322-324 South Main Street
Next to Wuerth Theatre
- 11; c :l: q l 11

ii

each fell victim to his slants
while Myron, Truskowski,
Kiegler each struck out once.
MICHIGAN

twice
and

Butler, rf.......
Langen, rf. .....
Superko, 3b.
Tompkins, cf.
Hudson, 1b. ....
Straub, lf. ......
Myron, ss......
Truskowski, c....
Daniels, 2b......
Kiegler, p.......
Totals .......

ABR H
..3 0 0
..1 0 0
..3 0 1
..4 10
..4 0 0
..4 0 1
..3 0 0
..2 0 0
..3 0 0
..2 0 0
.29 1 2

PO A
0 0
0 0
1 0
3 0
16 0
1'0
0 3
3 0
0 4-
0, 6
24 13

:5ElC
PHONE,
2 D RESSES
OR COATS

WIE
I

1 LS

PHONE

sI

- .

$175

MICHIGAN STATE
AB RHPO A E
Cuthbertson, 2b...4 0 0 1 2 0
Madonna, ss...... 3 0 0 3 4 0
Gibbs,cf.......4 1 2300
Sachs, lf. .........4 0 0 2 0 0
Griffin, p. ........4 1 2 0 1 1
Barnard, c. .......3 0 1 9 0 0
Pevic,3b........31 1 1 1 0
Knisel, rf.......3 0 1 1 0 0
Crall, lb. .........2 0 0 7 0 1
Totals .........30 3 7 27 8 2,
Michigan State..1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 *-3
Michigan .......0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1-1

SUDE
ASERVa - -

Dresses Over 20 Pleats Slightly Higher

OR

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1 Dress, 1i Coat or Suit at this Saving
These dainty garments are all handled with the
utmost care, cleaned in sheen restoring solvent
and all work guarantee,

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MEN'S SUITS
OR OVERCOATS

$115

OR

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1 Suit and I Overcoat at this Price
We clean in oil restoring solvent so essential to
woolen garments.
ALL WORK CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED
~2D~ir

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