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May 23, 1930 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-05-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

At,

THE MI 1411 A DAILY

FRIDAY, MAY 23 1930

£'AGE ~IX THE MICI4!CAN DAILY FIT?.IDAY, MAY 23, 1930

Iiun +rMrr re'. -

VARSITY WILL INVADE

PURDUE

DIA MOND

WOLVERINE[S FIGHT
FOfl SEVETH P'LACE
Varsity Seeking Revenge Against
Purdue for Start on Long
Loosing Streak.

t
I

SLEAGUE SCORES PL
AMERICAN LEAGUE H
Detroit .....001 002 030- 6 12 0 - _Ob
Sru
Chicago ....o010 000 000- 1 6 1 Cleveland and Detroit Gather! Striau
Bumper Crop of Newcomers Ficke
R H E in Big Leag.es.
St. Louis . . . .000 000 300- 3 12 0 lined
Cleveland ...000 200 000- 2. 7 0 TIGERS GET PITCHERS ing C
ing s

i,

MONTAGUE MAY PITCHc

MICHI
Butler,
Superk
Tompk
Hudsoi
Straub
Myron,
Trusko
Daniel.

PROBABLE LINEUPS
GAN ' PURDUE
Arf Snodgrass, ss
o, 3b Fleming, lb
ins, cf Mills, 3b
n, lb Caraway, if
, f VanBibber, rf
ss Harmeson, cf
wski, c Weaver, 2b
s, 2b Kugler, c

First Game:
Boston......000
Washington .000
Second Game:

Boston ......
Washington
First Game :
New York ..
Philadelphia

.000
.204
.212
000

I ,

R
000 002- 2
000 30*- 3
R
100 000- 1
114 10*-13
R
300 002-10
000 100- 1

H
5
5

Compton, Mon- Palo, p
tague, or Keig-
ter, p
With a chance of moving up to
the seventh place in the Big Ten
baseball standings hinging on the
result, Michigan's nine will invade
Lafayette today for a game with
Purdue. The Boilermakers now
rest in seventh place with a record
of three wins and six losses, as
compared to the Wolverine's two
victories and five defeats.
Today's game will take on the,
aspect of a grudge battle, as Pur- I
due was the team that started theI
Michigan nine on its long string of
Conference defeats, a losing streak'
that has already cost the Michi-
gan team four straight games.
When Purdue came to Ann Arbor it
was in last place, with five defeats
and not a single victory to its cred-
it, but fair pitching, timely batting,
and excellent fielding combined to
upset the Wolverines.
Compton or Montague will prob-
ably be given the pitching assign-
ment for the Maize and Blue in to-
day's game, although the excellent
performance turned in against
(Continued on Page 7)

Second Game: R
New York .. .720 201 215-20
Philadelphia 014 205 001-13
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
R
Brooklyn ....100 000 220- 5
Boston .......001 010 022- 6

H
5
18
H
16
6
H
23
15
H
10
13

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1

Although the American League
rookie crop of. 1930 is apparently a
little smaller than was the list o.:
1929 newcomers who rose to star-
dom in a single season, several
"finds" have been discovered by the
major league clubs in the early
games of the present campaign.
Cleveland and Detroit head the
list with five men apiece that ap--
pear to be a little better than the
average newcomer to Ameri.ar
League circles. In the case of the
Tigers three young pitchers have
showed fairly good form, Wyatt,
Herring, and Hogsett having hurl-
ed some nice ball in the early season
games. Hogsett, however, was with
the club for a brief period last sea.
son. Rogell, shortstop, and Funk,
outfielder, both appear as sure of
their jobs with the club, although
neither can be classed as newcom-
ers to the league, Rogell having
served with Boston and Funk with
New York.
Cleveland, after Dreakitng in sev-
eral good men last season, ha4,
come back with five more that ap-
pear worthy of consideration. Bob
Seeds, outfielder, has been hitting
the ball well and is classed as one
of the fastest men in the big
leagues; Burnett, third baseman,
rates among the leaders in Amer-
ican League batting; Goldman,
shortstop, is one of the best field-
ers in the circuit, although weak at
the plate; while Brown and Jab-!
lonowski both are headed for reg-
ular berths on the pitching staff.
Burnett has been on the club be-
(Continued on Page 7)

One
Mic
ko sa
Tom p
cente
Huds
hold
one h
Obc
balls.
fith s
son.
iels,
Butzb
called
error.
Mic
Trusk
ond,
poppE
out.
Obe
Supe
Adam
perky
runs,
Mic
ko a
doubl
Barr.
No ru
Obe
Barr

AY BY PLAY ACCOUNT OF TEN BOX SC(
INNING MICHIGAN-OBERLIN GAME
_
FIRST INNING flied to Straub. Two runs, two hits, MICHIGAN AB
erlin: , Williams fouled to two errors. Butler, rf .......3
Lb. Cromie singled to center. Michigan: Hudson doubled to left Superko, 3b.......4
n fanned. Cromie stole sec- center. Straub popped a foul to Tompkins, cf ... .5
Adams drew a walk. Irvin Adams. Myron drew a base on Hudson, lb ......3
a fast single to center, scor- balls. Truskowski's fly to Mein- Straub, If ........3
romie. Irvin was caught steal- hold was made a double play by the Myron, ss........2
econd, Truskowski to Daniels. throw to William. No runs,, one hit, Truskowski, c . .4
run, two hits, no errors. no errors.DI
FIFTH INNING Daniels, 2b....5
higan: Butler walked. Super- Oberlin: Cromie flied out to My- Presbrey, p ......1
icrificed, Butzberger to Irvin. ron. Ficken was out on a called Holtzman, p.......1
)kins hit a home run to left strike. Adams struck out, Trus- Monta 0
r, scoring Butler ahead of him. kowski to Hudson. No runs, no hits, Ma
no errors. I aNeal, p..... ,.. 0
on popped to Cromie. Mein- no errors...L..g.n.1
threw out Straub. Two runs, Michigan: William threw out *iel....1
Daels. Holtzman walked. Butler *' elbas.. .
it, no errors..Daniels.(:DoranI .........0
forced Holtzman at second, William..
SECOND INNING :to Meinhold. Butler stole second. ?
rlin: Barr drew a base on Superko grounded to Butzberger. Totals..........331
Presbrey hit Meinhold. Grif- No runs, no hits, no errors.
acrificed, Truskowski to Hud- SIXTH INNING OBERLIN AB
A throw, Truskowski to Dan- Oberlin: Superko threw out Ir-. Williams, ss ......5
caught Meinhold off second. yine Barr grounded to Daniels.Cormie, If........4
Berger walked. William was; Meinhold singled to right center. Ficken, cf ....... 5
out. No runs, no hits, no [ Griffith was called out. No runs, Adams, c.........2
s. ! one hit, no errors. Irvin, lb ...,.... 5
chigan: Myron drew a walk. Michigan: Tompkins singled off l Barr, 3b..........2
owski forced Myron at sec- Barr's glove. Tompkins stole sec- Meinhold, 2b ......3
Meinhold to William. Daniels ond. Hudson drew a walk. Tomp- Griffii~h, rf.......2'
ed to Irvin. Presbrey struck kins was out at third on Straub's Butzberger
Nrusnohtno err ors. atmteguzbrc p . ...3
No runs, no hits,attempted sacrifice. Myron popped Bell, p .... ... .. . ..0
THIRD INNING a high one to Meinhold. Truskow- _
erlin: Cromie singled though ski flied to Meinhold. No runs, one Totals........29
rko. Ficken was called out. hit, no errors.2
is hit into a double play, Su- SEVENTH INNING Unpire-Vick, Mic
to Daniels to Hudson. No Oberlin: Butzberger hit a home on balls-Off Butzbe
one hit, no errors. I run to left center. William struck
higan: Butler walked. Super- f out. Cromie was called out. Dan-'1, off Presbrey, 3; o
nd Butler were retired on a ici tossed out Ficken. One run, Wilt pitches--Butzb(
e play, William to Irvin to one hit, no errors. runs-Tompkins, Butz
Tompkins fouled to Adams. i Michigan: Daniels fouled out to I ,
ins, no hits, no errors. Irvin. Langen batted for Holtzmanout-Butzberger, 4;
FOURTH INNING rand fanned. Butler grounded to Holtzman, 4. Double p
erlin: Irvin singled to center.IWilliam. No runs, no hits, no er- to Daniels to Hudson
sacrificed, but when Presbrey rors. Irvin to Barr: Meinh

II
1
4
1
4
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0

2
0
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1
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P A
0 0
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10 0
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0
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10 6 30 22 4j

)RES
aPage 1)

TODAY
Board Adopts New Varsity Award
and Prepares Plans for
Football Seats.

5
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01

STUDENT SEATS BETTER
Upon the recommendation of the
student managers the Board in
Control of Athletics has officially
adopted a new sized varsity letter
which will be awarded for all in-
tercollegiate sports in the Univer-
sity. This new "M", called the num-
ber two letter, is six inches high
oy 8 7-4 inches wide as compared
with the present award in varsity
football which is 7 inches high by
10 inches wide. To those athletes
who prefer the coat sweater in pre-
ference to the crew sweater a num-
ber three letter will be given which
measures 4 1-2 inches by 6 3-7
inches.
The number two letter is the size
of the "M"' which is given for base-
Iball at the present time and was
approved by the board because of
its better appearance as compared
with the large varsity football let-
ter. A desire to standardize ath-
letic awards was another factor in
the decision of the officials. The
new awards will be given out for
the first time next fall with the
opening of the 1930-31 sport sea-
son. The cross country team will
' be the first group to receive the
new "M.
The board also decided at their
meeting to inaugurate a student's
section at football games which
will have its inception with the
pigskin season of next fall. The
students, who were formerly scat-
tered in all parts of the stadium,
will be placed in a group between
the two 30-yard lines next fall in
i (Continued on Page 7)

Elliot, Morrison and Lopez; Sei-
bold and Spohrer.
R H E
Phila. ...022 002 101 002-10 19 21
N. Y. ....011 020 022 000- 8 12 3
Willoughby, Collins and Davis;,
Walker, Genewich, Lucas, Mitchell
and O'Farrell.
Chicago ....200 002 251-12 13 1
Pittsburgh ..001 011 020- 5 13 23
Osborn and Hartnett; Petty,
Chagnon, Jones, Erickson and Bool.
R H E
Cincinnati ..100 100 000- 2. 8 1
St. Louis . .. .010 000 21*- 4 10 1
Frey and Gooch; Grabowski, Bell
and Wilson.

9 5 29 16 2
higan. Bases.
rger, 10; Beil,
ff MacNeal, 1.
erger. Home
berger. Struck
Presbrey, 2;
lays--Superko
n; William to
hold to Wil-
els to Hudson.
R
00 200 1001-5
00 000 0022-6

threw over Daniels' head, both men
were safe. Meinhold singled on a
hot one to Myron. Griffith sacri-
ficed, Presbrey to Hudson. Butz-
berger hit a sacrifice fly to Tomp-
kins, scoring Barr, Meinhold hold-
hig second. Straub muffed Wil-
liam's short foul fly. Williams then

EIGHTH INNING
Oberlin: Montague took the
mound for Michigan. Myron threw
low to Hudson and Adams was safe.
Irvin hit into a double play, Myron
to Daniels to Hudson. Barr ground-

liam; Myron to Dani
Hit by pitcher-Barr.
Score by inings:
Oberlin ...........1
Michigan ..........2

(Continued on Page 7)

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