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May 21, 1930 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1930-05-21

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 1930

*

1'*

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Published every morning except Monda
durngra Tjjvrstyyear by the Board i!n S
Coadl of Student Publications.
Member of. Western Conference ZIiterialF
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis-g
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
in this paper and the local news published1
herein. -
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
pf postage granted by Third Assistant Post.
e master General.
Subscription by carrier. $4.0; by wail,E
Oices: Ann Arbor Press Building. May1
mard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business,2 ta24.-
EDITORIAL STAFfIt
Telephone 4925
S MANAGING EDITOR 7
ELLIS B. MERRY
Editor.al Chairman........George C. 1 le
City Editor ...... .......Pierce Rosenberg
News Editor................Donald J. Kline
Sports Editor.......Edwar L. Warner, Jr.
Women's Editor...........Marjorie Follmer
" Teleraph Editor.......Cassam A. Wilson
SMusicand Drama........William J. Gorman
Literary Editor...,......Lawrence R. Klein
Assistant City Editor.... Robert J. Feldman
Night Editors-Editorial Board Membes
Fran E. Cooper Henry J. Me"
William C. Gentry Robert L. Sloe
Charles R. Ka ffnan Walter W. Wilds
Gurney Williams
Reporters
Morris Alexander. Bruce J. Manley
Bertram Askwitk Lester May
Helen Bar Margaret Mix
Maxwell Bauer David M. Nichol
Mary L. Behymer William Page
Allan H. Berkman Howard H. Peckhmn
Arthur J. Bernstein- Hugh ierce
tS.'rB.aBernsnger Victor Rabinowits
S. *Beoa M.oner John D. Reindel
Thomas M. Cooley Jeannie Roberts
Helen Domine oseph A. Russell
Margaret Eckels Joseph Ru witch
Catherine Ferrin Ralph R. Sachs
dCarlF. Forsythe Cecelia Shriver
I Sheldon C. Fullerton Charles R. Sprow
MthGallreyer Adsit Stewart
tuh Geddes S. Cadwell Swansol
Ginevra Ginn Jane Thayer -
Jack Goldsmith Margaret Thompson
,EmilyG nies Richard L. Tobin
Morris Croverms Robert Townsend
aMargar~t arris Elizabeth Valentine-
3uhn Kennedy H al 0. Wrn Jr.
Jean LevRey G. rL .ionel WilenssJr
ussell E. McCracken Barbara Wright
Dorothy Magee Vivian Zi i
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
A. J. JORDAN, JR.
Assistant Manager
ALEX K. SCHERER
Department Managers
Advertising. ..........T. Hollister Mabey
sAdvertising.. ......Kaspe H. Halverson
Service .......... ...KGeorge A. Spater
Circulation ......... Vernor Davis
Accounts .............John R. Rose
Publications. .......George R. Hamilton
Business Secretary-Mary Chase
Ass1stana
' James E. Cartwight Thomas Muir
Robert Crawford George R. Patterson
Thomas M Davis Charles Sanford
Norman"Eliezer Lee Slayon
orris Johnson Joseph Van Riper
Chales Kline Robert Williamson
Marvin Kobacker William R. Worboi
Women 'Assistants on the Business
staff.
Maria Atran Mary Jane Kenan
Dorothy Bloomgarden Virginia McComb
Laura Codling Alice MCully
Ethel Constas SylviaMiller
e, osopine Convisser Ann Verner
ernice Glaserv 1DsorothearWaterman
Anna Goldberger Joan Wiese
Hortense Goodimg
WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 1930
Night Editor-DAVID M. NICHOL
THE "CONCERT" OF EUROPE
Current news dispatches from
Europe indicate that Foreign Min-
ister Briand's latest proposal to
r create an all-European Federation
have met with general disfavor,
even in France, his home country.
One of the New York correspon-
dents stated recently that the plan
was "received coolly and met with
all sorts of adverse critisism." 1
Two definite stands have been
taken on the new consolidation
question which include nearly all
the prominent, leaders of the con-
tinent. The majority view the plan
as merely another "league without

teeth in it." There are a few less
sceptical statesmen, however, who
see the move at a "step in the right
direction." Although few modern
government heads are far-seeing
enough to actually picture a "Unit-
ed States of Europe" after centuries
of international conflict on both1
the battlefields of oratory and of,
war, there remain a scattered rem-
nant whose foresight is, we believe,
astonishing to say the least. I
It is not our point to declare that
the Briand plan will not work, for
nothing which has not been tried
need be condemned on sight. We
do contend, however, that the ideal
of a United States of Europe is
.just a bit far-fetched for even the
best imagination. Students ofI
European history are aware of theI
tremendous national and interna-
tional feeling which has influencedl
continental governments and peo-I
ple for the past thousand years.
The Great War proved that hetero-
geneous peoples 'cannot be cooped
up within certain definite borders
and expected to live peaceably
after centuries of hatred, rivalry'
and strife. When the United
State of American came into being,
one common cause prevailed, to
firmly cement the complex group

state is inspired is even theoretic-
ally false.4
Briand may be a far-sighted
statesman and may honestly be-
lieve in his "United States of
Europe" but the plan seems wholly
impractical and theoretically un-
sound. Briand's judgment in stat-
ing that eventually European na-
tions must consolidate against the
high tariff wall which the United
States perennially erects is sound
enough. But farther than a mere
commercial agreement between na-
tions of the continent, there can'
be little hope of a "United States of
Europe" under a plan more politi-
cally rigorous that the League of
Nations.
0
THE MC CORMICK-LEWIS
FIGHT.
The fight for the senatorial seat
from Illinois this fall will be one
which will attract nation-wide in-
terest. Mrs. Ruth McCormick will
run against Jim Lewis, of pink-
whisker fame, who is campaigning
on the Democratic platform.
Mrs. McCormick has lived in a
political atmosphere most of her
life. Her father was the brilliant
Mark Hanna, who represents the
nearest to a national "boss" that
the United State has known; her
husband was senator from Illinois
until his death in 1922. She ran
for the nomination against Senator
Deneen on the world court issue,
but, as a number of prominent
citizens pointed out in a petition
to the senatorial investigation com-
mittee, her real support came, not
because of her opposition to the
World Court, but from the Cook
county machine, which at present
controls Chicago, and the women's
votes. There were no clearly de-
fined issues except that the Cook
machine had tired of Senator De-
neen.
Jim Lewis, whose whiskers are
reputed to have faded somewhat
since he last sat in the Senate,
was one of Wilson's right hand
men during his administration. He
was one of the outstanding figures
in the senate, because of his per-
sonality, appearance, oratorical
powers, and political acumen. He
undoubtedly would add life to the
senate and take his place next to
Borah and Reed as the leaders.
The question on which he, as a
shrewd politician, wishes to fight
out this campaign, is prohibition.
The most astute candidates have
always carefully avoided this issue,
but Mr. Lewis, who usually thought
three jumps ahead of Deneen, be-
lieves that he can think one or
two ahead of Mrs. McCormick; and
in forcing the debate on this issue,
an event which Mrs. McCormick
is most anxious to avoid, he hopes
to win the election. Rumors are
prevalent that the Thompson ma-
chine supported Mrs. McCormick
to defeat Deneen and later back
Lewis; at present the odds are even,
but hte fight will bear watching
and the outcome will be of interest
to all ambitious women politicians.
-o

y,
ED ROLL
ELECTIONS
ARE
OVER.

0--

Md
Music And Drama

t

Well, the voting is over.'
mains the counting and
ing.
** *
I see the Union officials
hibited card playing in1

There re-
the grip-
have pro-{
the lobby

1
1
J

now. Never mind boys. Therey
isn't a single rule-(and I know be-
couse I spent a whole month read-,
ing the rules of the University on
the subject of misdemeanors)-as
I was saying there isn't a single
rule against playing marbles on the
diagonal. Come on fellows, let's go!
* * *
DISCOVERY.
The Rolls archaeological bureau
has dug up an interesting relic.
They report that over on an ob-
scure corner of the Law building
there is a tablet that says some-
thing about "Free Education, Per-
sonal Liberty." It is such valuable
work as, this that keeps us so well
informed on the manners and1
customs of the bygone ages so that
we may profit by their foolish mis-
takes.
a * *
FORECAST.
Rolls takes this opportunity to
prophesy by the aid of the special
dual control Rolls Patent three
speed prophesyer that whatever
the result of tpe honor system poll
was the average honor among the
theives that surround me in my
math class won't go up a bit.
(That was for the black hearted
villain who had the wrong answer
to problem five on his paper last
week. I guess it ought to show him
all right all right.)
* * *
I see by the papers that there is
now a possibility of getting some-f
thing in return for the ten dollars
a year we pay to the Union. Those
who have been here four years can
run right over and get a life-time
member's pin free. I regard this as
a laudable motion in the direction
of the "Free Education" business.
* a * *
ANOTHER DISCOVERY.
It has lately been determined by
a wealth of circumstantial evidence
that Shakespeare, when he wrotej
"Twelfth Night," was inspired to
dash off the ditty-"And the rain it
raineth every day" by a week's stay,
in Ann Arbor. We do not, however,
vouch for 'the authenticity of this
claim.
*k * *
A THIRD DISCOVERY.
I have just found that the rest!
of this column is already written.
That one is worth all the rest put
together.

TONIGHT: Second performance
of Albert Sherwood's historical
burlesque "The Road to Rome" in
the Mimes Theatre, at 8:30.
THE CAST.
\leta ......................E ugenic Chapel
Fabia ......................... Helen Carrn
Fabius .................... ...Gcorge Prichs
Amytis ....................Jospehine Rankin
Scipio ........................... Alvin Katz I
Sergeant.....................George Johnson
Hasdrubal. ..................George Tremble
Mago .......................Kenneth White
Hiannibal ...f.................Norm~an Brown I
THE ROAD TO ROME. j
A Review.
Mimes climaxed a strikingly hor-
rible year last night with a produc-
tion that definitely and vigorously
wrests the honor from Comedyl
Club's In Love With Love of being!
the most frankly bad dramatic fare

IT

L. G. BALFOUR CO.
1121 South University
FRATERNITY JEWELERS
Badges-Favors-Programs
Corkey Stanard, Mgr.
MAKE RESERVATIONS NOW
EUROPE, ORIENT 0o
ANYWHERE-
A BYLINE
STEAMSHIP
CLASS
TRAVELFRS CHEQUES. ETC.
E.G.KEBLER.Steamship Agt
Bos.L 6 41 IL.Hurw Aa Aror

Fi

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"~

-

*ONO

MICHIGAN BELL
TELEPHONEC~o
Telephne Ho"me
Long Distance Rates
are Su"prisingly

1i

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I

Editorial Coi

--e
mment

r

o --

BEAR MARKET.

(From The Harvard Crimson)
Dartmouth college went Boy
Scout yesterday morning in a fash-
ion that puts the famous Outing
Club to shame. Clothing designers
all over the country sat up to take
notice as the men of green-five
hundred strong - turned out for
the daily jamboree in shorts. Lead-
ing Hanover undergraduates report
the abbreviations are here to stay
and manufacturers of young men's
apparel are getting ready for a
short cut to style.
It is only too easy to picture the
i effect of Dartmouth's attempt to
cool off. When New Haven tailors
found out they could sell more
cloth if they cut their customer's
trousers like a sailor's every office
boy in New York followed suit. At
Dartmouth the college newspaper
thought it necessary to urge foot-
ball men to set the precedent for
shorts in order that the more timid
would follow. This counsel was
unnecessary, the habit will doubt-
less spread across the country over
night. Boys in the big city to the
south who have been running
around all winter without hats will
shortly have the pleasure of mak-
ing -their flapper friends feel at,
home in the subway.
At Harvard, where threre is a
strong msaculine tradition never
to be caught short, the new vogue
will probably not get much of a

AH! A PROOFREADER CRASHES
THROUGH'
Every Michigan Man Firmly
Maintains and Believes That:
1. The dean's office employs
male and female spies.
2. All Ypsi girls are of question-
able character.
3. All our athletes have an easy
paying job.
4. Good looking co-eds get bet-
ter marks than they deserve.
5. The B. and G. boys spend
most of their time looking for work
to do.-
6. English professors are all ef-
feminate.
7. Only grinds elect math.
8. High school girls secretly wor-
ship him.
9. All Japanese students are Phi
Betes.
10. He knows where to get the
best beer in Ecorse.
11. Next year the football team
will be better.
12. All economic professors go
broke on the market.
13. Truck has athlete's foot.
14. The Gargoyle steals most of
its jokes.
15. George Tilly writes most of
The Daily.
16. All student elections arel
crooked.I
17. Most medics turn out drunk-
ards.
18. Engineers use a slide rule to
square two.
19. No one goes to the Arboret-
um to study plant life.
20. All dent students come from
South America.
21. ' He has discovered a new
pipe course for the next semester.
22. Canoes are not made to pad-
dle.
23. Everyone used to join the
opera as an excuse to get drunk.
24. Dean Rea is scared to cross
the street in traffic.
25. Nobody ever reads Rolls.

offered in the last three years. Un-
doubtedly one shouldn't have gone.
The play (in rehearsal about a
week in all it is rumored) was ob-
viously far from ready for dress
rehearsal. In its form last night,
it proved valuable as a textbook
of immaturities-the pecularly ob-
noxious immaturities that only
amateurs can turn loose.
The first act was first in horror.
George Priehs, by punctuating all
his lines with feverish lapses of
memory, made the act, from the
point of view of tempi, a fantatia
by Stravinsky-Which is confusion
of the arts. He was playing the'
part of Fabius, the elderly Roman!
Kelvinator whose talk and toga
bored his wife, Amytis. He was
anxious to point Sherwood's satiric'
moral ("the old Roman helmeted
head is the same as the fat Rotar-
ian head, world without end,
Amen") and probably would have.
But his memory failed him. This
is a fault at which normally every-
one is rightfully tolerant; but not
when by repetition it is quite suf-
ficient to make one act of three
quite ridiculous.
Of course, there were other
faults, too numerous to fully eluci-
date. Scipio staggered in with hor-
rible red gashes, delivered his news,
and then discovered surprising
virility and remained masterfully
erect and potent throughout the
act. This same actor had a mar-
velous gesture-hand high in the
air, fingers subtly poised-which he
duplicated with amazing accuracy
at least twenty times throughout
the play. The entrance of the
three senators anticipated the ele-
phant parade which they were
later allowed to witness in Hanni-
bal's camp; they all were very
heavy and all stumbled. Then, per-
haps eager to atone , they spoke
very feebly and unromanly for the
frest of the act.
The last two acts were not,
couldn't have been, as bad as the
first. They were adequately medi-
ocre. Norman Brown gave solidity
and sense to the production by a
grave, honest projection of Hanni-
bal in all his bellicose stiffness.
Miss Rankin, too, as Amytis gave
an adequate rendering of her part.
Doubtless, she never fully recover-
ed from the torturous shock of the
staggering cues and rhythms she
got in the first act from her hus-
band. Doubtless, in later perform-
ances she will get more of the hu-
mour out of the part, as very clear-
ly she has the right conception.
George Johnson again proved
his talent for burlesque very pleas-
antly. George Tremble as Has-
drubal added fine vehemence and
I fine tempo to the production. Ken-
neth White was uproariously pa-
thetic as Hannibal's brother, con-
demned to keep the elephants in
order to prove Hannibal's imparti-
ality.
In fact, throughout the last two
acts there was clear indication of
the presence of talent enough to
warrant a successful production
about Friday night. This indica-'
tion of the talent present warrants
the harshness of the criticism here.
Otherwise one might merely laugh
pleasantly at the miserable child-
ishness with which Mimes tore up;
Robert Sherwood's delightful his-
torical cartoon. As has been the
case for some years, those responsi-
ble for the direction seemed to have
no interest in the minor details of

this production. And as usual, the
minor details overwhelmed the
talent.
A man is being brought here next
month to consider the dramatic
situation on the campus from the
point of view of a problem to be

A Reliable
Source
of
Information
Printing
News
While It Is
News
THE
MICHIGAN
DAILY

t ..,..,_...
.r----

c
AFTER
UNIVERSIT Y
WHAT?
A practical secretarial or accounting
course will prepare you for definite
employment.
Begin at once or with the summer
classes in June.
Free placement service.
HAMILTON
BUSINESS
COLLEGE
State and William Sts.

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Drin >r
Delicious and Refreshing
There's a

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The representative rates listed below are for
day Station-to-Station calls and are effective
between 4:30 a. m. and 7:00 p. m.
A Station-to-Station call is one made to a
telephone number rather thin to a particular
person.
You may reverse the charges to your home
telephone if you wish.
Day
Rates from Ann-Arbor to:'Ratf
ALBION.... ..$040
BENTON HARBOR........ ..... ..95
CHARLEVOIX .:.. . .... .. .. .. 1.30
CHICAGO....... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 1.05
COLUME~vBUJS, ~..... . . . . . . . . . . . . .90
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Your calls will be speeded if you give the
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ask "Information."

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trii,'7.

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".'

A

Silvr Lining
f

" , ±
/' (
/

,
."_

1

i 1..... ___._ :

that refreshes
So many unhappy things can happen to
increase that old inferioritycomplex. Deans
and Doctors, Mid-years and Finals, all dedi.
cated to the cause of making life a burden.

'- a-ntLdIcSTEN - *-!. u
brantiand Rice- tss--Famnow

Coca-Cola was made for times like these.
Here's a drink that will quickly invest
You with some ofits lifean inrarke

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