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May 13, 1930 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1930-05-13

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PAGE 1POU1

THE MICHICAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MAY 13, 1930

________________________________________________ ________:._____________

Published every atorning except Moaday.i
uiring the Unversity year by the Board Inv
contol of. Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editodalt
Association.C
The Associated Press is exclusively entitledl
to the use for' republication of all news di-
Y atches credited to it or not otherwise credited
a this paper and the local news publishedN
herein..]
Entered at the postoffice at An Arbor,
Michigan, as second class mhatter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistat Post
naster General.j
'Subscrip on by carrier, 4.o; by mall,
$4, 0.
ffces: Ann Arbor Press Buildiag, May'
lard' Street.
Phones: Editorial, 492: Business, sa4-
EDITORIAL STAF,
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
ELIS B. MERRY
Editorl Chairman........George C. Tlle
City Editor................Pierce Rosenberg
News Editor................Donald J. Kline
Sports Editor.......Edward L. Warner. Jr.
Women's Editor............Maroris Follmer
Telegraph Editor.,.......Cassam A. Wilson
Music and Drama.....William J. Gorman
Lterary Editor........Lawrence R. Klein
asistant City Editor. . Robert J. Feldman
Niht Editors-Editorial Board Members
Frank F~ Cooper Henry J. Uerry
Willian C. Gentry Robert L. Sloes
Charles R.Kaffman Walter W. Wild
Gurney Williams
Reporters
Morris Alexander. Bruce J. Manley
Bertram Askwitk Lester May
Helen Bar Mrgaret Mix
Maxwell Bauer David M. Nicol
Vary L. Behymer William Page
lan . Bekman Howard H. Peckham
AllahuJ. Berntn Thugh Pierce
Srthur Je Bnstner Victor Rainodita
8. eac Coger John D. Reinde
Thomas M. Cooley Jeannie Roberts
Helen Domine Joseph A. Russell
Margaret Eckels Joseph Ruwitch
Catherine Ferrin Ralph R. Sachs
Carl F. Forsythe Cecelia Shriver
Sheldon C. Fullerton Charles R. Sprowl
Ruth Gallmeyer Adsit Stewart
Ruth Geddes S. Cad well Swansc
Ginevra Ginn Jane Thayer
ack. Goldstnith Margaret Thompson
mlyGrimes Richard L. Tobin
Morris Covc'nia Roert Townsend
Margaret arris Elizabeth Valentine
Iul n Kennedy Harold . Warren, Jr.
lcslln Levy {t. Lionel Wiles
uss .McCracken Barbara Wright
Dorothy Magee Vivian Zir it
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
A. J. JORDAN, JR.
Assistant Manager
ALEX K. SCHERER
Department Managers
Ad vertising........' H lollister Mtley
Advertising............Kasper I,. Halverson
Service................... G:eorge A. Spater
Circulation...... .. . Vernor Davis
ccouts......... ......John R Rose
auliations..........eorge R. li amiton
Business Secretary-Mary Chase
Assistants
riles F. Catwright Thomas Muir
oert awford George R. Patterson
1homas M. Davis Charles Sanford
Norman E ezer .ee Slay ton
Norris Johson Joseph Vn Riper
Csailes Kline Robert Williamson..
Marin Koacker William R. Worboy
Women Assistants on the Business
Staff.
Mayran Atran Mary Jane Kenan
Dorothy Bloomgarden Virginia McComb
Laura Coadling Alice McCully
thel Constas Sylvia miller
]Josephine Convisser Ann Vener
Eernice Glaser . Dorotha Waterman
AW Goldberger Joan Wiese
Httense Gooding
TUESDAY, MAY 13, 1930
Sht Editor-JOHN D. REINDEL.
EMOVE A RECENT PREJUDICE
Is understood that negotiations
r now pending to introduce the
tudy of the German language into
te curriculum of the University
gh school. As a model high
school, established by the Univer-
sity to give other secondary
schOols throughout the state an
example upon which to base their
administration and curricula, it is
high time that it. includes this im-
portant language among those sub-
jects taught. Since the close of the
World War 12 years ago, all the
better high schools of the country
and state have reinstated German
in their courses. The high schools

of Grand Rapids were the most re-
cent converts among the larger
high schools of Michigan.
Aside from the utilitarian pur-
poses of studying German for con-
versation, or to work off the pre-
requisite for higher academic 'de-
grees, are the commercial and dip-
lomatic objects. Germany is once
again forging ahead in the welter,
of the world's affairs and so it will
have attained the position that it
held before the Great War. It will;
be ; indispensable to all business'
men who look to foreign marts.
And by no, means the least con-.
Sideration is the fact that once
again the language of Heine, Schil-.
ler, Lessing, and Goethe will have
been made available to the cul-.
tural advantage the youngest gen-
eration,
HUMANITARIAN SCIENCE.
One manifestation of Dr. Rob-
ert A. Millikan's credo for modern
science, contained in the maxim
that science can justify itself only1
insofar as it aids in the general
welfare of the world, is the recent,
decision of the Regents to cooper-
ate with the National Research
council and a group of other uni-
versities in their search for harm-
less substitutes for the terrible

medicinal qualities of a narcotic
but it would lack those vicious
increments which force men and
women into pitiful fights with
themselves. The successful ameli-
oration of this social ailment would
be an inestimable factor in the
scientific efforts of the modern
world to make itself a better place
in which to live.
"Petting," says a leader of an
intercollegiate club, "is passing
out." On the other hand, the early
census returns show 222 more in-
habitants in Paw Paw.
0
Campus Opinion
Coutributor. are asked to be brief,
confining themselves to less than zoo
worvs of possible. Anonymous co.a-
mnunications will be disregarded. The
names of communicants will, however,
be regarded as confidential, upon re-
quest. Letters published should not he
construed as expressing the editorial
opinion of The Dgily.
To the Editor:
"Refusing to accept the propos-
ed installation of a bookstore oper-
ated as a department of the Union,
the Regents of the University yes-
terday voiced the opinion that the
Union of the University should not
compete -with local merchants."
(Front page story, The Daily of
Saturday, April 10, 1930.)
Thoughtful students upon read-
-_ +n n ruseY~n n cro Y~, n n

OA TED RLL
HERE'S AN
ANONYMO1US
- TRYOUT.
Broke in the golf season with a
bang yesterday. I shot a 58-no;
never mind the brick. I wouldn't
spring such an old gag. It was for
nine holes.
* *~ *
A lady in front of me took nine l
putts. Then she put the ball down:
where it had landed and took a
practice shot, holing out in one.
"Oh, dear," she said to her com-1
panion, "can't I use that one? It's
so much better."
* * *
The girls rode past the course
on horseback. It ought to be pro-
hibited. It's an artificial method of
locomotion. A horse may be a liv-
ing animal but like an automobile
it has no soul. If you don't believe
me, try riding one.
* * *
One of the riders was tearing
along at a fearful rate. The other
one lookedas though she wished
she were home too.
I was surprised to hear a lot of
profanity on the course. I didn't
know that the modern dramatists
had taken up golf so generally.

Musk And Drama!
TONIGHT: The last performance
in the Mendelssohn Theatre of:
Lennox Robinson's comedy "The I
Whiteheaded Boy" by Play Produc-
tion under the direction of the
auithorI. .
NEW VICTOR REORDS.
RAVEL Bolero: by Serg Kous-
sevitsky and the Boston Symphony
Orchestra: with Gymnopedie by'
Erik Satie on the extra side: Rec-
ords No. 7251 and 7252.
Because he has been vigorously1
sponsoring Ravel's excitingly mon-
otonous work all season, playing
it twice in Boston and twice in New
York, Koussevitsky was chosen to j
do the recording for Victor. It is!
a safe assumption too that he plays
it more interestingly than any
other orchestra in the country.
The work requires superb solo in-
struments in the wind section - a
qualification which the Boston or-
chestra has notably filled for some
years.
Koussevitsky manages the slow,
cumulative evolution into the tre-
mendous sonority of the last record
with sublety, cleverly suggesting at

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Hark To His Master's Voice!

Saying

ing tne aaove paragrapn are at
once struck with the feeling that
there's "Something wrong in this A player behind me got hit in
picture." A more careful analysis the head with a golf ball. Too bad
of the situation not only reveals a -there are enough hazards on the
lack of art, but produces the sus- course already without the play-
picion that there may be some- ers getting in the way.,
thing wrong in the gallery itself! , *
The action of the Regents in thus If you want to find out who's
blocking, for the moment at least, writing this, walk around campus
an enterprise calculated to give re- I and hunt someone with a sunburn-
lief to students from monopoly ! ed neck.
prices they now must pay for books4
and supplies can be accounted for H
on one of two premises. The Re-, Headline in Sunday's Daily: "De-C
gents are either (1) misinformed, ferred Rushing to be Discontinu-
or (2) motivated in their action by ed." Now if it had said "Deferred
private interests or influenced in a Rushing to be Ignored" -- that
manner entirely unworthy of the would have been news.
high position of trust they occupy. 1 * :

Before going further it is best to
have it understood on statement
of high authority that the matter
was submitted to the Regents
rather as a matter of courtesy than
as one of right. This being the
case, they were not justified in tak-
ing the arbitrary action that they
did in the absence of grave abuse
or utterly mistaken policy on the
part of those instigating the inno-
vation. We do not believe that
either of these factors exist. The'
matter has been thoroughly and
carefully gone into by a committee
the competency of which no one
can question. Much time has been!
spent in research, planning and in-
vestigation. The proposition is in
no way hastily conceived or ill
considered. Michigan is the only
state university in the Big Ten
without a cooperative bookstore ofI
some sort. These various stores are
shown to be for the most part con-
ducted efficiently and at a sub-
stantial saving to students. _
Certainly living expenses are
.high enough in Ann Arbor (among
the highest in the United States4
some statistics show), and any
worthy, tried and sound project
.which will lower student expenses
is to be commended and encourag-
ed rather than stamped out with a
gesture.
That the proposed bookstore con-
travenes an element of policy is
shown by the fact that the Union
conducts a barber shop, a billiard
room, a bowling alley, a candy
counter, soda fountain, cafeterial
and dining room, all of which may
be said to enter somewhat into
competition with local merchants.{
Why then, we ask, the discrimina-
tion in, this particular instance? It
is known that a leading local book
merchant was in conference with
a power at the Union less than 15,
minutes after the initial committeel
.had approved of this project. What
he did after that is a matter of1
conjecture. Suffice it then when an
individual or group of individuals
attempt to make his or their inter-
ests paramount to those of 10,000
students, someone is riding for a
fall!
If it is the attitude of 'the Re-
gents that the University exists for
the benefit of the local merchants.
then the Regents are mistaken. In
this particular instance, student
opinion -is rising on all sides and
will ultimately force a fair decision.
It is to be hoped that such will be
accomplished with minimum fric-
tion to all concerned, but let it be
clearly understood that the stu-
dents resent the implication of

Another headline: "Fewer Con-
flicts Seen in Progress for Examin-
ation." Tsk, tsk! Too bad. In the
rest of the head it says that the
political science examination will{
be held because of an error. My,
my; I think I'll take that course
next year, just in the hope that
there will be no more mistakes.
* * *
The Michigan advertises a show
with a million laughs. Counting a
half minute for each laugh that
would take about 8,333 minutes or
approximately one year. Let's go,
Sandy.

That show would
man a life time.

last an English-

X. CALIBRE.
*'* *
AND HERE IS ANOTHER.
They WILL refuse me an upper
staff position, eh? Well, I'll get
even with them. I'll write half a!
Rolls column and when the astutel
editors read it, they'll die of shame.
Thereis a rumor afloat that the
Paris and the Greene Cleaners are
about to merge. How appropriatel
Paris-Greene would be for this
time of year.
* * *
Speaking about this time of year,
I've noticed that certain students
in the Music School are brushing
up on a few of the recent song hits,
notably "My Fate is in Your Hands"
and "Oh, How Was I to Know?" No
doubt they are getting ready for
finals.
The 'Ensian is scheduled to ap-
pear tomorrow and we'll be able to
try our cuss words on the photogra-
phers who made our pictures look
so bad. (I was going to use a more
satisfying word but I don't know
whether you spell it with an S or
a Z.)
* * *
Well, there's one consolation for
hot weather-it makes the arbore-
tum a pleasant place. The arbore-
tum-for those who haven't heard
of it-is a splendid place to study
(astronomy). Of course, it's awful
dark there, so watch those future
shadows if you want to be lucky.j
Another advertisement t h a t
seems to be going the rounds is
the one that says, "Get More Drive
Out of That God Golf Gas." I sup-
pose that means less slice to the
orange disk.

early moments the sonorous possi-
bilities of the subject. The actual
recording' manages to project the
intricate instrumentation with sur-
prising clarity, suggesting that al-
most nothing is impossible to re-
cord now.
The Chicago Symphony is play-
ing Bolero on the Fourth program
of the estival. Written in 1928
for the dancer Ida Rubinstein and
performed ;by her in Paris,. the
work :has, been variously consider-
ed by critics to be everything from
an extremely amusing bon mot to
the epic o m of dullness. Ravel's
! previous experiments with Spanish
music have been frequent, notably
among them the Rhapsodie Espag-
nole. Indeed most of the compos-
ers of the French and Russian
school1&av& flirted with the colors
and rhythms Spain affords.
This time, writing for a dancer,
IRavel has-done carefully what has
lwayshas dnedone romantically,
diffusely. Paradoxically enough,
the Bolero might be celled a study
in monotonyi 'Whih Ravel has
managed to exploit and exhaust
his considerable talent for orches-
tration. Choosing.a simple, ordin-
ary, unornate bolero, and placing
it over an intricate fascinating
rhythmic figure, Ravel merely re-
peats this snall section again and
again with' slight variation in in-
strumentation and a gradual grow-
ing into sonoroty. By. sheer force
of repetition, this music creates the
illusion of inevitability-of music
we all must have heard in a pre-
vious life{miniSpain. It is a clever
piece of music, if nothing more.
BEETHOVEN: S o n a t a in. A
(Kreutzer), Op. 47: played by Al-
fred Cortot and Jacques Thibaud:
Victor Masterpiece Series No. 72.
This set, a foreign importation,
is distinctly a valuable duplication
-that is, an immense improvement
over the recording of the Kreutzer
Sonata done years ago for Victor
by Isolde Menges and Arthur De-
Greef.
eAneindication of the talent need-
ed for performance of this work
might be gained from Beethoven's
own words about it: "It is written
in a very concertante style, as if it
were a concerto." Cortot and Thi-
baud, by inference, would seem to
meet the demands; they are both
solo artists of considerable dis-
tinctions and in addition have been
intimately associated for years.
They have equal powers and
mutual sensitiveness. The result is
a fine interpretation. They have
fine feeling for the healthy vigour
and self-assertiveness of the early
Beethoven attitudes; but by re-
straint they manage to minimize
the virtuosic appeal. Cortot's years
of Chopin-playing has given him
the pianistic wisdom that makes
his instrument as sensitive as Thi-
baud's violin:
Miscellaneous Records:
Vladimir Horowitz, by now
something of a legend, makes a
small record (no. 1455) of the Doh-
nanyi Cappricio in F Minor, which
he played in his program here as
an encore. He doesn't worry about
the musical values of this small
piece, definitely making it an at-
tractive show-piece; the result is an
astounding fusion of brilliance and
perfect clarity. On the other side

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