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May 13, 1930 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-05-13

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'EAN1Y 1 I3,- 1930
TO SPEAK HERE OiJ
UNIVERSITY SERIES
Dr. Charles Singer and Wife,
Famous in Europe, to
Talk May 20, 21.
ARE FAMOUS AUTHORS

_
,... _ . .-

THE MICRI AN D~AILY

Playwright Receives
193 0 Pulitzer Awaid

STATESHWS GAI
iNERY RETURNS
Completed Counts of 20 Cities
Present Large Increases
wtoell State Total.
CENSUS NEARS MILLION
Manistee, Albion Report Only
Decreases; Pontiac Leads
Urban Growth.
(By Associated Press)
DETROIT, May 12.-The Michi-
gan census neared the million mark
today with . the Associated Press
tabulation showing partial returns
from 76 counties and completed
counts for 20 of the state's cities I

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Scientific Change,' Alchemy
Will be Topics Discussed
in Two Lectures.
Two distinguished lecturers, Dr.
Charles Singer and Dr. Dorothea
Waley Singer, have been secured by
Dr. Frank L. Robbins, assistant to
the .President, for appearances in
Ann Arbor on May 20 and 21, re-
spectively. Dr. Charles Singer will
speak on the "Scientific Change
from Medieval to Modern," at 4:15
o'clock Wednesday afternoon, May
21, while Dr. Dorothea Singer will
appear at the same time on May 20
to deliver a lecture on "Giordano
Bruno, Martyr of Science." Both
lectures will be given in Natural
Science auditorium.
Although both visiting scholars
are well known in the United States,
their greatest renown has come
through honors accorded them, in
European educational circles. Dr.
Charles Singer is, at present, the
president of the International com-
mittee of the History of Science at
Paris, a member of the council of
the History of Science society. in
Cambridge, Mass., former president
of the third International Congress
of the History of Medicine, head of
the department of the History of
Medicine at London University, and
president of the International con-
gressof the History of Science and
Technology, in London, next year.
Has Written Many Books.
Aside from his honorary positions,
Dr. Charles Singer is the author of
several books, among which are
"From Magic Science," "Studies in
the History and Method of Science,"
"A Short History of Medicine,"
"Early English Magic and Medi-
cine," "Cures of the Diseased," and
"Greek Science and Modern." His
topic, "The Scientific Change from
Medieval to Modern," upon which
he will base his Ann Arbor lecture,
has long been a familiar one to
him.
Dr. Dorothea Waley Singer has
also been prominent in European
educational circles during the past
several years. She has served as a
me'mber of the International com-
mittee of the History of Science,
member- of the Council of. the His-
tory Section of the Royal Society of
[edicine, and a former member of
the Committee of the Historical as-
socation, _..
IsoiAuthority on Alchemy..
Aimong her writings are several
volumes of catalogues of "Alchemi-
cal Manuscripts," in Greek, Latin,
and the vernacular which were
published in 1924 at London. She
has also been a steady contributor
to the "Transactions of the Inter-i
national Medical Congresses" from
1913 to the present day. Many other
journals of note have also publish-
ed her articles, among which "Isis,"
"Archeion," and "Bodleian," at Ox-
ford University, are the most prom-
inent.
"Alchemy"' has been chosen as a
fitting topic for Mrs. Singer's ad-
dress at Ann Arbor. She has made
a special study of this subject and
her lectur .should be of particular
interest to students of medicine.
SENATORS5 CON VN
KFOR NAVALINOIRY
Stimson Gives Outline of Treaty
Before Hearing of Foreign
Relations Committee.
(B 'lAssiated Press)
WASHINGTON, May 12. - The
London naval treaty became the
focal point for inquiring senatorial
eyes today as the foreign relations
committee opened public hearings
with Secretary.Stimson as its first
witness. .
Before a crowded room, the sec-

retary of state, who was head of
the American delegation to Lon-
don, described the treaty as a long
forward step toward peace. He
explained in detail how the pact:
was designed to attain British-Am-
erican parity at sea, to fi, for the
first time definite limitations for
all categories of warships for the
United States, Great Britain and
Japan and to help open the way
as well for future limitation by
France and Italy.
While Mr. Stimson read his.,pre-
pared statement and invited ques-;
tions from the committee, Secre-
tary Adams of the navy depart-
ment, another American delegate,
and several of the delegation's na-
wal- _ nvartania na fnr. , a,, turn

j1

Associated Pres Photo
Marc Connelly.
Author of play "The Green Pas-
tures", who was awarded the Puliti
zer prize for writing the most out-
standfig drama of the year.
GAOI0MVEMENT
British Arrest Many Followers
of Mahatma Gandhi in Raid
on Salt Works.
WOMAN IS NEW LEADER
(By Associated Press)
BOMBAY, India, May 12.-Ma-
hatma Gandhi's civil resistance
movement today received its sec-
ond great setback with the arrest
of Abbas Tyabji and a large group
of his immediate followers at the
moment when they were starting
from Navasari to raid the Dhar-
sana salt works.
The government's action follow-
ing Tyabji's refusal to call off the
proposed raid after repeated warn-
ings by government officials. Com-
mand of the forces of "passive re-
sistance" immediately was taken
over by Mrs. Saironji Naidu, Hindu
poetess, selected by the Mahatma
to succeed as leader.
The seizure of Tyabji coincided
with government plans for a tight-
ening of control of the entire In-
dian situation.
While the arrested leader and his
cohorts were being transferred to
the jail just outsideNavsari, the
civil authorities in Sholapur an-
nounced that two more military de-
tachments had been sent from
Poona, the second battalion of the
Royal Ulster Rifles and a whole
battalion of headquarters troops, to
complete military control of that
disturbed community.
Almost simultaneously the Brit-
ish authorities in the Gujerat dis-
trict sent a final notification to the
Haj i or. Turangzai,. serving notice
uroon him to remove with his fol-
lowers with all speed from the
vicinity of the recently embattled
Peshawar.
IL DUCE E X AUL TS
SEA ASPIRATIONS
Mussolini Gives Warlike Talk
at Leghorn Celebration.
A. 3 :ssocialed Press) .
LEGHORN, Italy, May 12-Prem-
ier Mussolini Sunday exalted Italy's
maritime aspirations in a 10-min-
ute speech full of patriotic senti-
ment, delivered before a crowd of,
55,000 wildly cheering Livournese.
The celebration was in honor of
Leghorn's heroic resistance in 1849
to the beseiging Austrian army. The
premier arrived here in the course
of his tour of Tuscany.
"I want to say not only to you,
but to the people beyond our fron-
tiers, that we are not anxious to
precipitate adventures," said Mus-
solini. "But if anyone deceives him-
self so far as to think he can halt
our onward march, he will find the
whole Italian people in front of
him. If our frontiers were threat-
ened, there would be gathered one
human mass-nay, a thunderbolt-
launched against any and all com-
ers."
Recalling that the day was, the
anniversary of Leghorn's battle
with the Austrians, the Duce de-
clared: "There is something unes-
capable, inevitable, in this march
toward destiny of Fascist Italy, and
nobody can halt it!"

Larouche to Address
Journalists Thursday
L. W. Larouche, '22, will be the
guest speaker at a meeting of the1

representing sizeable population
gains.
Three of the 76 counties from
which returns have been received
have indicated that their enumera-
tion is complete. These counties
are Lake, Leelanau and Missaukee.
This far 978,003 persons have been
counted, bringing the state's net
increase in, popuiation~ to 157,733.
Many Counties Show Loss.
Returns received during the past
week did not alter the course of the
population movement shown from
the outset of the census, although
at least one county was shifted:
from the decreasing to the inceas-
ing side of the ledger by the week's
reports. Thirty-five counties now
are showing losses as compared
with 36 a week ago. The average
loss of these counties is 889.2 per-
sons.
Forty-one counties, or 54 per cent
of those from which partial re-
turns have been received, are show-
ing average increases of 4,662.85
persons. The state's census in its i
present incomplete form covers 530
towns, villages, townships and
cities, of which 275 have increased
in population, 226 decreased, two
remained unchanged and 27 with
no comparative figures available.
The drift in ppulation continues
toward the state's industrial cen-
ters.. All but two of the 20 cities
of 8,000 or more showing com-
pleted counts at this stage in the
census also have shown gains. The
two losing cities are Manistee, with
a loss of ,1,753, and Albion, with a
loss of 88. The list of growing
urban centers is headed by Pontiac,
whose gain was 31,371 persons over
1920.
At this stage in the census Oak-
land county is exhibiting the most
imposing popufat 6n increase in the
state. The, population of the coun-
ty now stands at 140,826, with 35
centers counted. This represents an
increase of. more ,.than 50,000 in
comparison with tie complete 1920
figure,: and a net gain of the coun-~
ty of 66,805. This margin of gain
exc.eds that of the ,entire 1910-20
period by 26,330. Only one center
in the county 4as failed to report
a gain in the past decade.
Gould W11 Return
A fll Vina Exams
Prof. wrenpe (arry) M. Gold,
of the geology department, second-
in-command of the Byrd antarctic
expedition,-will probably. not return
to Ann Arbor until after the final
examinations are over, it was mdi-
cated d y Prof. William H. Hobbs, of
the, geology department, yesterday.
"Gould is still. mosj ,2,00 miles,
away f rom Panama," said Professor
Hobbs.. "Since the 'Eleanor Bolling'
is towing the .New York.' they are
only making .125 miles a day and
will not arrive at Balboa for about
eight or inemre days. Should
Gould take a boat to New Orleans,
and then a train here, he would ar-
rive earlier; but most probably the
whole party will want to arrive in,
New York tgether."
Prof. Ralph Belknap, of the geo-
logy department, said that Admiral
Byrd had taken a fast 20-day mail
boat from New Zealand on the 24th
and should arrive in Panama to-
morrow. He will wait there for the
rest of his- -expedition before con-i
tinuing to New York.{
Er~g Frfessor
Returns From Meeting
lurgikal engineering de partment
has returned from, Washington, D.
G.. where. he attended the annual'
meeting of -the Metallurgical divi-
sion o the United States Bureau of
Standards. -

An .dvisory ,commission made up
of, metallurgists from manufactur-
ing plants and eight. university lab-
oratories was established during the
sssions, .whiph wer e attended by
more tha-n a hundred -men from all'
.ntr ,n, a h wsied Sates

.,..,.,, ....,.. -e -.-+n

" _ _ ... , yRR. ...
YOUR

SHOPPING

DIRECTORY

.

(Cut This Out And Keep Iii A Convenient Place)

BANKS
Ann Arbor Saving,....... -.-...707JINorth University
Farmers and Mechanics....... Nickels Arcade
BARBER SHOP
Dewey Smith .................1110 South University
BEAUTY SHOPS
College Beauty Shop,........ 300 South State
DiMattia Beauty Salon........34 South State
Fifty Ave. Shop ......Nickels Arcade
Michigan .eauty Shop ........ Michigan Theater Bldg.
Mirror Beauty Shop.........
Raggedy Ann Beauty Shop...1110 South University
Stoddard Hair Shop .........707 North University
BOOKS, STATIONERY, SUPPLIES
Mayer and Sehairer........,..112 South lair'
0. D. Morrill..............314 South State
Slaters Inc.,.................320 & 334 S. State, 549 L. U
Stu4ent .Supply .............1111 South University
George Wahr's...... ........316 South State

MEN'S CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS
Browning,,King Co..........319 South Main
Camel et Bros. .............308 South State
Conlin and Wetherbee.......18 . Washington
Torn Corbett................116 E. Liberty
Del. Prete.................213 E. Liberty
Fiegel's..................332 South Main
Greenwood & Kilgore.........324 South State
Holden & Co...............212 South Main
Lindenschmitt and Apfel.....209 South Main
Marquardt, Tailor ...........608 E.. Liberty
Masten and& Chase.......... 211 South Main
Miltons Inc................119 South Main
R. & B. Clothing..........214 South Main
. Sa fell and Bush ..........604 E. Liberty
'Thompson's .........1107 SouthUniversity
Tinker & Co............342 South State
Van Boven Inc..............326 South State
adhanns & Co...........109 . Washington
Wagner Co................303 South State
Wild & Co................311 South State
MARKET

CANDY AND SODAS
,uetsy losy.................. Nickels Arcade
Mwietland . . ........12 South Main
Michigan Soda Grill.... ,.... 601 Fast Liberty

Ann Arbor Dairy ............. 118
Arbor Springs Water .........4th,
Dawn Donuts,.............216
Forest Ave. Market ...........530
Hoaglin's Pies ..............111
Liberty Market .............416'
McDonalds Ice Cream........ 436
Purity Bakery ..............707
Sharr Grocery ..............709

W. Liberty
and Catherine
E.. Washington
Forest
Miller
W. Huron
Third
Packard
Packard

CLEANERS
American Dry Cleaners......2. . ]5E. Washington
American Rug Cleaning .......1032 Greene
Goldman Cleaners ...........214 South State
Greene Cleaners ..............516 E. Liberty.
Oswald _Katz, Cleaner .........814 South State
White Swan ................ Maynard Street
COAL'
Cornwell Coai.............. Huron and Fourth
DANCING
Armory...................223 E. Ann
Michigan Union ............ South State
Michigan League ............ North University
DEPARTMENT STORES
Goodyear Co. . .............124 South Main
Mack & Co................ Main at, Lilerty
Montgomery Ward & Co...... South Fourth near Liberty4
DRUGS
Clkins-Fletcher .........324 & 818 S. State. 1101 S. U.
Crippens Drug.............North University at Thayer
Eberbacah & -Sons............ 20,0 Fast Liberty
Edsill Drug Co.............208 South main
Swift Drug .................340 South State
ELECTRICAL AND RADIO
Arborphone aSa.es .. ...........521 E. Liberty
CrpsleyrAmrad Radio Shop. .. 615 E. William
Ernst Bros. ................210 South. Fourth
Detroit Edison,. ..............Main at William
Stimpson Radio............521 E. Liberty
FINANCIAL
Brown-Cres & Co....... . ....irst Natiox:al Bank Bldg.
Merrill Lynch & Co........Main at Huron

P -OTOGRAPHERS
Dey Studio..............334 South State
Francisco Boyce .............719 North University
Rentschler Studio ...........319 East Huron
Seaton Studio ..............1209 South University

Cfh usi "oi
University Music House.
Choral Union Concerts .
Schaeberle & Son .........

. Maynard at William
I- HIl Auditorium
110 South Main

REAL ESTATE
A. S. Lyndon ............... 302 Ypsi Ann Bldg.
Brooks-Newton .............. Liberty at Fourth
RECREATION
Mullison's Stables...........326 E. Ann
Saunders Canoe Livery....... Foot of Cedar
RESTAURANTS AND TEA ROOMS
Arcade Cafeteria ............. Nickels Arcade
Bright Spot ................802 Packard
Clarks Tea Room............1110f) South University
Le Roy Clayton............611 E. Williams
Chubb House ...... .....South State
The Den...........1108 South University
Freeman's Dining Room......809 E. Washington
Forest Inn................538 Forest
German-American ............122,.W. 'Washington
Tap Room................Michigan Union
Lane Hall Tavern...........Stateat Washington
M Hut................ South State
Michigamme Restaurant......607 E. Liberty
New Granada ..............313 South State
Parrot .....................338 South State
Jo Parker's .................4th, near Huron
R. and S Lunch .............605 Church
Student Inn ...............702 Hill
SCHOOLS
Hamilton Business College.....State at William
Mack Tutoring Agency ....... 310 South State
SHOE REPAIRING
A. T. Cooch & Son.........1109 South University
SHOE STORES
H. W. Clark................1113 South University
Alexander Inc. ............324 South State.
Burton's Walk-Over1Shop ... :115 South Main
Campus Bootery............304 South State
Earle Boot Shop.........r...123 East Liberty
Kinney Shoe Co............. 117 South Main
L. and B. Shoe Store ......... 620 E. Liberty
J. Murphy Boot Shop.........9 Nickel's Arcade
-iefle & Nissle .............. 307 So. Main
Jacobson's.................East Liberty
SPORT GOODS
George Moe ................North University, 902 State
WOMEN'S GARMENTS AND FURNISHINGS
Collins Shop ...............600 E. Liberty
Dana Richardson-..........Nickels Arcade
Goodyear Co......-........124 South Main
C. J. Hutzel.................301 So. Main
Jacobsons .................. Liberty, near State
Kessel's....................323 South Main
Kress Stores.............115 E. Liberty
Mack & Co...............Main and Liberty
McKinsey Hat Shop..........227 South State
Helen .Shop ..............537 East Liberty
Mary Shaw Shop ............ E. Liberty
E. F. Mills Co...........118 South, Main
Rubley Shop. ......... . ...8 Nickel's Arcade
Vogue Shop ................221 South Main

FLORISTS
Flowerday & Son....

.609 E. William

FURS
E. L. Greebau..--........448 Spring St.
Zwerdling Fur Shop........ 217 East Liberty

FURNITURE
Chas.. Wuerth & Co..
Stanger Furniture.
GRAVEL:
Killins Gravel Co.......
JEWELRY
Carl Bey.............
Ba .our............
Burr Patterson & Auld .
Hallers..............
Schlander and Seyfried. .
LAUNI RIES
White -Swan .... . ... .
Moe Laundry...........
Trojan Laundry .......
Varsity Laundry .......

.. 113.115 B. Washint.
.117 West Liberty
... .. Kresge Bldg.
..16 Nickels Arcade
......1121 South University
......603 Church
......235 South State
......304 South Main
.ress Bldg., Maynard St.
..20 North Main
. .. 615 E. Liberty
.. ..300 South Fifth

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