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May 08, 1930 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-05-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FOUR

THE M IH CHIGAN

DAILY

THURSDAY. MAY 8. 1950

i '_

Published every morning except Monday
flaring the Unjvesty Year by the Board in,
Cn tul of Studnt Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial'
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all newsrdis
atescredited toit or not otherwise credited
n his paper and the local news published
hetiein .
Entered at the postoffice at Aan Arbor,
*ighigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post.
master General.
SubscriPtion by carrier, $.os; by small,
4fces: Ann Arbor Press Buildng, May
ar~d Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 2114.
EDITORIAL STAF
Telephone 4925
# MANAGING EDITOR
"I' ELLIS B. MERRY
Editorial Chairman........George C. Tilley
City Editor...............Pierce Rosenberg
News Editor.............Donald J. Kline
Spots Editor....... Edward, L. Warnerjr.
Women's Editor......... ..Marfora Foimer
Telegraph Editor.-......Cassam A. Wilson
Music and Drama......William J. Grman
Literary Editor..........Lawrence R. Klein
asistant City Editor.... Robert J.Feldman
Night Editors-EditorialBoard Members
FrankE. Cooper Henry J. Merry
William C. Gentry Robert L. Sloss
Charles R. Kauffman Walter W. Wilds
Gurney Williams
Reporters
Morris Alexander. Brucer Manley
Bertram Askwt Lester May
'Helen Bare Mrgaret Mix
Maxwell Bauer David M1. Nichol
Mary L.Behymer William Page
Allan H Berkman Howard H. Peckham
Arthur J. Bernstein IHugh Pierce
S. Beach Conger John D. Reindel
"Thomas M. Cooley Joan"e Rober
hele Donjue Joseph A. Russell
Margaret Eckels Joseph Ruwitch
Caherine Ferrin Ralph R. Sach
Carl F. Forsythe Cecelia Shriver
Sheldon C. Fullerton Charles R. Sprowl
Ruth Gallmeyer Adsit Stewart
Ruth Geddes S. Cadwell Swanso
Ginevra Giun Jane Thayer
ack Goldsmith Margaret Thompson
Emly Grimes Richard L. Tobin
Mrris' Croverma Robert Townsend
Margaret Harris Elizabeth Valentine
eCuil en Kennedy Harold 0. Warren, Jr.
tan Levy G. Lionel Willea
ussell E. McCracken Barbara Wright
Dorothy Magee Vivian Zirt
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
A. J. JORDAN, JR.
Assistant Manager
.ALEX K. SCHERER
Department Managers
Advertising........... T. Hollister Mabley
Advertising........Kasper I1. Halverson
Sea earLi
Service.George A. Spater
circlaton ... ...... . . Vernor Davis
Accoun3ts..........John R. Rose
Publications...George R. Hamilton
Business Secretary- Mary Chase
Assistants
aumes °E. Cartwright 'Thomas Muir
aobert CrawfordrG eoge R. Patterson
Thoias M. Davis Charles Sanford
Norrman Eliezer 1ee Slayton
Noiris Johnson Joseph Van Riper
ades Kline Robert Williamson
Marvin Kobacker William R. Worboy
'Women Assistants on the Business
Staff.
Mfarian Atran ]'Mary Jae Renan
Dothy Bloongarden Virginia McComb
Laura Codling Alice McCully
:1thel Cfostas Sylvia M'liller
osephine Convisser Anm Verner
erniceEeGlaser Dorothea Waterman
pna oldberger Joan Wiese
Aortense Gooding
THURSDAY, MAY 8, 1930 I
Night Editor-DAVID M. NICHOL
ACADEMIC SALVAGING.
Swarthmore's progressive presi-
dent, Frank Aydelotte, has just
given the lie direct to those com-
placent souls who have demanded
that The Daily cease from circu-
lating its opinion that the literary
college is in more need of academic
regeneration. In the New York
Times of last Sunday he states that
"the most encouraging feature of
the outlook for higher education
in this country is our saving dis-
content with conditions as they are
at present."
- And then in a masterful analy-
sis of our degraded academic stan-
dards, he goes on to say exactly

What we, in our rude, untaught
way, have been trying to express
during the past year - that the
present system of awarding A.B.
degrees is disastrously keyed down
to the average . student's ability.
"At present," he says, 'the ordinary
Bachelor's Degree means the ac-
cumulation of 120 hours of aca-
demic credit. These credit hours
are interchangeable. Most colleges
and universities accept them at
their face value-like checks on the
banks which are members of the
Federal Reserve system. The stan-
dard of quality required is perforce
the standard which can be main-
tained by a student of average
ability. If any other standard
wyere insisted upon, the whole
scheme would fail to work."
"Like the 'economic man,' this'
hypothetical average student is
supposed to buy his credit hours
in the cheapest' market and to sell
them in the dearest. What he is
supposed to want is the bachelor's
degree on the easiest possible terms
and our ponderous academic ma-
chinery of cuts and exercises, tests
and examinations, dean, and sub-
deans has been evolved to make
sure that he pays at least some
real value for his degree in terms
of work and memory.
"Under our traditional 'course
and hour' system the pace must of

The evil which this system works
on our best students is not merely
that it does not require them to
work sufficiently hard; it is as well
a positive interference with inde-
pendent and thoroughgoing aca-
demic study. Those academic reg-
ulations which are necessary to
make sure that indifferent stu-
dents will do at least a modicum
of work for their degree are cum-
bersome and hampering to their
more ambitious fellows, who can
be counted on to do their best and
whose primary needs are freedom
and guidance."
This powerful indictment of our
American system of higher educa-
tion should give every Michigan
man food for serious thought -
with prophetic power approaching
the uncanny it pictures the deca-
dent situation on the local cam-
pus. It constitutes a stinging chal-
lenge to the supine complacency
with which Michigan has accepted
the evils of mass education as a
by-product of the Great War.
Swarthmore, like Harvard, Wis-
consin, Chicago and many other
great universities, has accepted the
challenge. Every Swarthmore stu-
dent who has shown sufficient
promise by the end of his sopho-
more year is given an opportunity
to escape the stereotyped "course
and hour" system and to use the
resources of the university as he
sees fit for the mastery of an as-
signed field. He and his chosen
professors then become allies
against the common enemy which
has to be met two years later - a
comprehensive examination in
that field conducted by professors
from other universities.
Professor Aydelotte is "amazed
and delighted to see how marked
has been the change in the atmo-
sphere of academic work produced
by the introduction of methods of
this kind, even on a very small
scale." It makes us heave a re-
gretful sigh for the recent pigeon-
holing by President Ruthven of the
University college idea.
THE MAY FESTIVAL.
The glamour of the May Festival
-the presence of professional art-
ists and the inevitable social con-
notations-tend to obscure what is
perhaps its primary claim to tre-
mendous importance. The Festi-
val, in a singularly skillful way,
crystallizes all the available musi-
cal resources in the community.
By harmonizing and centrlizing
musical instincts, the Festival, con-
sidered as a sound educational pro-
ject, has created in Ann Arbor a
musical culture not very frequent-*
ly equalled by any town in the
United States.
The details of this process are
largely physical ones. Primary
among them is the weary story of
long hours of arduous rehearsal
that any member of the Choral
Union could tell. With the diversi-
ty of interests on the campus,
week-in, week-out co-operation
from September to May is hard-
won by Dr. Moore from a large
body of students. The benefits
accruing to the members for their
work, though substantial, are
vague and elusive and not easily
verbalized with conviction. They
are, of course, the cultural benefits
of an intimate acquaintance with
several of the world's greatest
choral works. The creation of this
body of students with a liberal mu-
sical education and the enthusiasm

to inspire the desire for it in
others is an educational project
with profound cultural implica-
tions.
Then, too, behind the short de-
lightful appearance of the, chil-
dren's chorus eliciting pleased com-
ment, there is a story of childishly
intense competition, also import-
ant in its educational implications.
At the beginning of the school
year, all the children in the public
schools are taught the numbers to
be sung in the Festival. Through-
out the year, then, there is a se-
lective process, supervised by the
teachers, which gradually reduces
the chorus of all Ann Arbor's school
children to the some three hundred
that appear in the Festival.
The process is based on some-
thing akin, in musical education, to
the athletics for all principle. At
any rate, the Festival provides a
genuinely important focus for a
happy educational project that in-
spires, because of its competitive
aspects, enthusiastic and valuable
co-operation from all Ann Arbor's
children.
Added to these the entirely bene-
ficial influences it exerts on an
audience of six thousand, the Festi-
val looms as something more than
an event - as a subtle, fortunate
crystallization of the difficult im-
plications of musical education,

I

. ASTE ROLL
T THE FRESH
AIRCAMP -
IS ASSURED '

Music And Drama,
THIS AFTERNOON: At 4:15,
Lennox Robinson, director of the
Abbey Theatre, will lecture on Irish
Plays, Playwrights and Producers
in the Mendelssohn.

I

According to all reports the cam-
pus crashed through in good shape

yesterday. All day long half dol- MR. ROBINSON TO LECTURE.
lars clattered into the buckets and .
judging from the number of tags This afternoon in the Mendels-
waving- in what breeze there was sohn theatre Lennox Robinson will
nearly everybody must have con- give his second lecture in connec-
tributed to the camp fund. tion with his visit here as guestl
* * *director at Play Production.
There was a nice variety of sen- a
timent printed on the tags but the Last week Mr. Robinson very
sense of humor of the campaign vividly outlined the history of the
solicitors worked overtime when Abbey Theatre as an institution,
they gave all the girls tags bearing fighting for and attaining perman-
the inscription, FOR NEEDY BOYS. ence and solidity of existence. He
s.had time then to merely indicate

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Begin at once or with the summer
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Optical Prescriptions Filled
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STATE STREET JEWELERS

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FENCING
for
Residences

ATTENTION, S. C. A.r
Dear Joe: I am in debt $1,100.42,
I have only one shirt and haven't
enough money to get it laundered,
and I am failing in all my courses
because I can't afford the ink to
fill mycfountain pen.Then the S.
C. A. comes around and gives me
a dirty look because I don't give
them a dollar to help the POOR
boys! Tsk, tsk!
Oscar.
We're in the same boat, Oscar,
so I'll let you in on a little secret.
You can frill your pen for nothing
at the post office.
QUANDARY.
Dear Joe: I'm in a quandary (not
quarantine). If I don't -have an
'alarm clock I sleep through two
morning classes. I tried a plea-1
sant, soft-toned alarm clock but
it failed to waken by native reso-
lution enough and I turned it off,
went to sleep, and missed threes
morning classes. Finally I tried a'
loud alarm but the darn thing
woke me up to suddenly that my
antagonism was aroused and I
hurled it across the room, went
back to sleep, and missed four
classes. Why don't the University
let us have our classes at. night
during this hot weather ?
Marmaduke.
*' * *
I don't know why. But don't let]
is get you down. You're sad case
No. 10,857 which makes you prac-
tically normal.
* a *9
ANOTHER PROBLEM. ,
Dear Joe: I am an ardent back-
er of your Coatless campaign but
want to say it just won't work.
They won't let you come to the
dinner table without a coat. So
what're you gonna do? You gotta
eat.
Cal Amity.
*. * *
What am I gonna do? Put on a
coat, I suppose.
SILLY GOLF JOKE.
(Illustrated by the Author)
She: (Not shown in above pic-
ture): "I hear you went golfing
yesterday."
He (the man on the right):
"Yeah."
She: "How did you make out?"
He: "I shot: a hundred."
She: "What are you going to do
with them all?"
' * *

the nature of the various tradi-
tions which have given it its im-
portance.
This afternoon's lecture is given
in response to requests for more
detailed technical elucidation of
the drama, the playwrights, the
actors ,and the directors who have
made the Abbey Theatre some-
thing more than a theatre.
Mr. Robinson is planning expo-
sitional and critical remarks on
the earlier dramatists as well as
some conjectures about the con-
temporary dramatists on whom he
thinks the hope of the tradition to
rest.
Then, he intends to offer a de-
scription of the aesthetic and the]
technique of the Abbey actors who
have contributed quite as much to
the theatre's fame as haves the
dramatists
Because of the Abbey Theatre's
peculiar resemblance in organiza-
tion and in achievements to the
ideal that the American Little The-
atre movement is striving for, Mr.
Robinson's remarks will have in
addition to interest in themselves,
valuable relevance to the complex
currents in the American dramatic
situation. The lecture is to be
given at 4:15.
0
THE WHITEHEADED BOY.
Tomorrow evening Play 'Produc-
tion climaxes its year's activity
with a. presentation of The White-
headed Boy by Lennox Robinson.
The author has been here for the
past three weeks as guest director
and has had full charge of the de-
tails ofproduction.
The Whiteheaded Boy is one of
his best-known comedies, having
been done frequently in this coun-
try by professionals and amateurs,
It is a dry, sharp comic transcript
of Irish manners in a middle-class
household. Unhesitatingly, Mr.
Robinson has displayed the Irish
peasant in all his capriciousness
and instability. The Geoghegan
family is trenchantly projected in
its few salient characteristics. Con-
stantly the play has marked satiric
implications but all the motives
are treated by the author with per-
fect coolness and reserve so that
the surface of the comedy is never
ruffled by personal intrusions.
The plot is clear and simple, per-
haps slight. A whole family has
stinted itself that one of the sons,
his mother's white-headed boy,
might have an important career.
The son Denis, fully aware of his
limitations but anxious to fit the
legend his family has built about
him, has'gone to Dublin to medi-
cal school. But there he had shown
greater fondness for betting on
horses and had failed his examin-
ation three times.
The play opens after his third
failure. The oldest brother has
now become bitter over the sacri-
fices they have made for Denis and
determines to send him off to Can-
ada to make his own way. Denis
takes it bitterly and immediately
renounces his engagement to a
young girl in the town.
The family, from exaggerated
motives of pride, decide to an-
nounce to the town that Denis is
going off, to an important position
in Canada that will mean he is a
man of importance. This becomes
the main complication for the girl's
father, John Duffy, heatedly
threatens a breach of promise suit.
All the members of the family
silently try to bribe him generally
with the money of another mem-

ber.
But the plot is less important
than the energy and pungency of
the reproduction of character and
manners. These people Robinson
writes about are interestingly dis-
agreeable - revealing as they do
violently contradictory character-
istics, quietly alternating the most
unscruplous lying and bribing with
piety and honest sentiment. They

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Evenings
"The Parrot
Speaks for Itself"

I!

Hark To His Master's Voice! Saying
.GOTo UNIVERSITY MUSIC HOUSE
For Everything Musical

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The most popular ready-
to-eat cereals served in
the dining-rooms of
American colleges, eat-
ing clubs andfraterni-
ties are made by Kellogg
in Battle Creek. They in-
clude ALL-BRAN, Corn
Flakes, Rice Krispies,
Wheat Krumbles and Kel-
logg's Shredded Whole
Wheat Biscuit. Also
Kaffee Hag Coffee-the
coffee that lets you sleep.

PEP-- flavor-health! You
get them all in Kellogg Pep
Bran Flakes.
You can't beat the match-
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ter bran flakes have. The
quick energy of their crunchy
whole wheat. And the health.
fulness of their bran-just
enough to be mildly laxative.
Ask that Kellogg's Pep Bran
Flakes be served at your fra-
ternity or campus restaurant.
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I know another
Watch for it in an
*. *

golf
early
*

joke
issue.

too.

Now that the campus is well
lighted why don't the B. & G. boys
bring back the benches they whisked
away in the interest of student be-
havior? I know a lot of students
who would like to sit under a light.
What are the chances, Mr. Pardon?
* * *
Unless something new develops
(and that isn't likely) I'm all
through talking about the Library
seal. For months I've been plug-
ging away trying to make the stu-
dent body realize the full signifi-
cance of their violation of respect
to a noble and cherished-yeah;
well anyhow, I'm twice as tired of
writing about it as you are of read-
ing about it. You're entirely wel-
come, I'm sure.
* *V *
Just because I keep talking about
the hot weather doesn't mean I
don't like it. It suits me to a T,
but itdoesmakethingssticktogether
likethis.
* * *
Pity the poor gent who is pay-
ing for space in The Daily to ad-

They're Coming!
They're Coming!
They're Coming!
They're Coming!
-and. still they come
We checked customers names and we learn
that 8 out of every 10 new customers that came_
when we cut prices to the bone have come again
--and again! That means th-y MUST be de-
lighted with White Swan quality. -
Men.'s Suits
Cleaned &Pressed--Cash &Carry
40C
TheLowest Rate in the State

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