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May 01, 1930 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1930-05-01

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THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

THURSDAY, MAY 1, 1930,

EF15

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Published every morning except Mondayj.
during the University year by th Board in
Conti o of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conferance Editorial
Association...
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis.
r atches credited to it or not otherwise credited
n this paper and the local news published
herein.

a
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achievement as the criterion of a
student's worth. It tended, also,
by refusing to shelter students
from the hard conditions of life, to
produce graduates who could take
care of themselves creditably in
the welter of worldly affairs.
Today all this has been sadly al-
tered, as the Rev. Harris suggests,
by the "protracted adolescence of,
a great many students who, living
a privileged life or less free from

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OASTED ROLL
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CONTRIBUTORSj
TO THE
RESCUE.

Music And Drama

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Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,Z
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
cf postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
miaster General.E
Subscription by carrier, $4.os; by mall,
$4.0.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May.
bard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 2sar4-
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
ELLIS B. MERRY1
Editorial Chairman........George C. Tiesj
City Editor. ..........Pierce Rosenberg
News Editor.............Donald J. Klinei
Sports Editor......Edward. L. Warner, Jr.
Women's Editor...........Marjoria Folimer
Telegraph Editor.......Cassam A. Wilson
Music and Drama......William J. Gorman
Literary Editor ......... Lawrence R. Klein
Assistant City Editor... .RobertJ3. Feldman
Night Editors-Editorial Board Members
Frank E. Cooper Henry J. Merry
William C. Gentry Robert L. floss
Charles R. Kauffman Walter W. Wilds
Gurney Williams
Reporters
Morris Alexander. Bruce J. Manley
Bertram Askwith Lester May
Helen Baia Margaret Mix
Maxwell Bauer David M. Nichol
Mary L. Behymer William Page
Allan H. Berkman Howard H. Peckham
Arthur J. Bernstein H-ugh Pierce
S. Beach nger Victor Rabinowits
S. Bech Coger Johin D. Reindel
Thomas M. Cooley eannie Roberts
Helen Domine Joseph A. Russell
Margaret Eckels Joseph Ruwitch
Catherine Ferrin Ralph R. Sachs
Carl F. Forsythe Cecelia Shriver
Shtldon C. Fullerton Charles R. Sprowl
Ruth Gallmeyer Adsit Stewart
Ruth .Geddes S. Cadwell Swanson
Ginevra Ginn Jane Thayer
Lack Goldsmith Margaret Thompsos
Emily Grimes Richard L. Tobin
Morris Gfover msa Robert Townsend
Margaret Harris . Elizabeth Valentine
. ullenKennedy Harold O. Warren, Jr.
eanLevy G. Lionel Willens
ussell E. McCracken Barbara Wright
Dorothy Magee Vivian Zimis

economic

responsibilities,

spend

four years at college at the expenseI
of their parents and the statej
merely to have a good time." Whatj
has happened to the German ideal
of academic purity on which the'
University was founded? It has
been lost in the deluge of paternal-
ism regulations, studies of student
maladjustments, investigations of
educational psychology, and anS
astonishing charity toward the}
mental incompetent, all of which
seem calculated not to produce
leaders but to inflate the ego of
mediocrity.
This organization of our colleges
and universities for the protraction
of adolescence is certainly the dan-
ger of paternalism seen by the Rev.
Harris. The curious admixture of
liberalism, which he also notes, is
less easy to find. Perhaps it con-
sists in the slipshoddiness of our
literary college curriculum, or the!
liberality with which passing
grades are given or the nonchalancej
with which 1,000 A.B.'s are award-
ed each June, or the utter free-
dom with which students are al-
lowed to exercise, or very possibly
the abandon with which they are
permitted and almost encouraged
to waste their time.
o

Following the publication yester-
day morning of that iniquitous and
treacherous proclamation issued
by the Big Shot, has come a re-
sponse that does my heart good. I
was a bit doubtful about the wis-
dom of giving publicity to Big
Shot's plan to boycott the column
by forming a Rolls Contributors',
Union, but my exposure of the plan
has resulted in a deluge of letters
from staunch supporters who have
pledged themselves to stand by the
column and frown upon any such
treason as the Big Shot is advo-
cating.
Some of the messages from faith-
ful contributors read as follows:
"The idea of a Rolls strike burns
me up. Here's one contributor who
will refuse to take part in the re-
volt."

Tobe.
Big Shot to boil hi

"Tell the
ears in fat."

The Chink.
"Count on me, Joe. The Big Shot
has bitten off more than he can
chew this time."
The Beachcomber.
"War is hell."
Sherman.
I could quote hundreds more but
it won't be necessary. I think I
can safely say that the crisis has
been passed and that Rolls will
continue to appear on schedule.

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
A. J. JORDAN, JR.
( +* Assistant Manager
ALEX K, SCHERER
Department Managers
Advertising ............ T. Hollister Mabley
Advertising........... Kasper H. Halverson
service .................. George A. Spater
Circulation................. . V ernor Davis
Accounts.. ,.......:.......... John R. Rose
Publications............George R. Hamilton
Business Secretary-Mary Chase
Assistants
James E. Cartwright Thomas Muir
Robert Crawford George R. Patterson
Thomas M. Davis Charles Sanford
Nornian Eliezer I.ee Slayton
Norris Johnson Joseph Var Riper
Charles Kline Robert Williamson
Marvin Kobacker William R. Worboy
Women Assistants on the Business
Staff.
Marian Atran Mary Jane Kenan
Dorothy Bloomgarden Virginia McComb
Laura Codling Alice MCul ly
Ethel Constas Sylvia Miller
Josephine Convisser Ai Verner
Bernice Glaser Dorothea Waterman
Anna Goldberger Ja Wiese
Hortense Gooimg
THURSDAY, MAY 1, 1930.
Night Editor-FRANK E. COOPER
DANGEROUS PATERNALISM.
The Rev. Thomas Harris, for
several years student pastor of the
local Episcopal church, finds in
this University a "curious mixture"
of liberalism and dangerous pater-
nalism. While agreeing with him
about the "dangerous paternalism",
it comes as a surprise to many of
us that the Rev. Harris, noted for
his liberal views, can find any lib-
eralism at all in the watchful air
with which Michigan mothers its
student brood. It should be re-
membered, however, that he is a
graduate of Cambridge whose Brit-
ish brand of collegiate paternalism
makes the life of the American col-
legian seem relatively anarchical.
Trained under the Cambridge sys-
tem which, by a paradox peculiar
to Britain, produces men of unus-
ual independence and strength of
character, the Rev. Harris probab-
ly cannot experience as much em-
phatic disgust with Michigan's pa-
ternalism as can young men with
American ideals of self-govern-
ment and personal freedom.
The University of Michigan has
traditionally avoided the influence
of British universities and pat-
terned itself, as was the design of
its founders, after the German
ideal of pure academic' training.
Originally this University was con-
ceived as a fountainhead of learn-
ing around which those who wish-
ed and were worthy could gather.
Any who came for a lark, and who
frittered away the state's money
in the customary forms of college
vice, left for home not because they
were vicious but because they fail-
ed in the classroom to prove their
sympathy with the fundamental
academic purpose of the Univer-
sity. It was unnecessary for Uni-
versity officers and self-appointed
moralists to police the students in
their revelry, for moral reform was
not then regarded as a function of
the University.
There can be little doubt that

EVERYBODY UNHAPPY. This should prove encouraging to
If some miracle-maker could, anyone considering the possibility
with a sweep of the hand, remove of taking over the editorship of
every trace of the tariff bill about this column. It won't be long now
to be reported to the Congress from before the entire staff will be
the conference committee, almost changed around, and along with

everybody in the nation, including
President Hoover, the Jfarmers,
factory workers, capitalists and
consumers, would be decidedly the
happier.
The measure is the worst tariff
bill that has ever been passed in
the history of the United States.
Nobody is satisfied with it. Presi-
dent Hoover does not want it, at
least it i's not what he promised in
his campaign. It does not satisfy
the farmers, for whose aid it was
instigated, for the slight increases
in agricultural duties, does not give
farming the desired equality with
industry. Nor are the nigh-protec-
tionists pleased, for the industrial
rates were raised but slightly and
they are much out of proportion to
each other.
Politically, there is likewise gen-
eral d~issatisfaction. Joe Grundy,
called the "author" of the bill, is
far from pleased. In fact he is
openly condemning it from the
viewpoint of not only industry, but
also labor, the farmers, and the
consumers in his campaign to re-
main a Pennsylvania Senator.
Other high-protectionists, t h e
Progressives, who once dominated
debates and the disloyalty of some
of whom to the coalition allowed
the bill to pass the Senate, are all
disgruntled about the matter.
With nobody soundly pleased
with the measure, its fate in Con-
gress is difficult to determine. Most
likely the legislators will take the
easiest path: to pass the bill and
then let their press agents smooth
over the protests of sundry inter-
ests through the country. But
whatever they decide, it will be a
ticklish proposition. If, by a miracle
the whole tariff matter could sud-
denly vanish, the whole of Wash-
ington and most of the country
would be greatly relieved.
Above it all, there was prac-
tically no need for a new bill. The
Fordney-McCumber measure ade-
quately fills the need for protec-
tion. But the farmers had to be
promised something in the past
election. Then with the outcrop-
ping of more than the usual
amount of political dickering dur-
ing the past year, there results a
bill, in the making of which every-
body had a hand to the extent
that nobody is pleased. The nation
is being forced to accept an un-
necessary tariff measure that will
seriously disturb the economic
balance now most vital to the na-
tion, all because a few ambitious
a n d narrow-minded politicians
thought they could profit by play-
ing with one of the country's most
serious problems.
AREN'T THEY?
The other day a federal judge
who was examining an applicant
for naturalization papers asked
him who was president of the Un-
...__l .l t

the general scramble I shall prob-
ably be ousted from this position.P
Therefore it behooves me to en-
courage any of you who would like
to try it to submit a sample column.
All acceptable columns will be pub-
lished over the name of the con-
testant, and an appointment will
be made as soon as everyone has
had a whack at it. The job pays a
salary and is worth working for. In;
fact, writing the column is just]
like this:-
I ~
Tomorrow the annual spring
shambles, made by the co-opera-
tion of the sophomore and fresh-
man classes, will take place in and
near the Huron river. According
to the sophomore leader, the sec-
ond-year men will be on deck with
"blood in their eyes." The fresh-
men will be there, I suppose, in
the same condition with perhaps
their noses thrown in for good
measure.
AMONGST OUR CLASSIFIED.
WANTED-Bicycle in good con-
dition.
Seems as though somebody is
thinking of going home already.
* * *
LOST-Light brown wallet. . . .
If that wallet is as light as mine
is these days, fella, I don't see why'
you waste money advertising for it.
* * *
Dr. John Stoddard, Michigan's
oldest living alumnus, hopes to at-
tend the 71st reunion of his class
here next month-all by himself.
He's the only one left of his class.
There's something pathetic about
that, and yet-think: There won't
be any arguments as to who will
speak for his class; there won't be
any danger of an enthusiastic but
sour quartet of the class of '59 to
disturb the peace; and Dr. Stod-
dard can tell all about the good
old days on campus without fear of1
correction. I hope he gets here;
he would have a grand old time.
* * *
Even Ann Arbor water tastes
good these days.
* * *
OVERHEARD IN THE
ROMANCE LANGUAGES
BUILDING.
"Parley-vous francais?"
"Pardon me?"
"Parley-vous francais?"
"I don't get you."
1 n rn .- - Vrnn 119"

TONIGHT: In the Mendelssohn
heatre, the Cercle Francais pre-
nts Moliere's Les Precieuses Ri-
cules and a twelfth century dra-
a, Le Mystere D'Adam.i
At the Whitney, Richard Sheri-
in's The Rivals with Mrs. Fiske
iher popular role as Mrs. Mala-
op.
ROBINSON TO LECTURE. I
Friday afternoon at 4:15 in the
[endelssohn Theatre, Lennox Rob-i
ison will give the first of the two
ctures which he intends to give
i connection with his visit here
s guest lecturer at Play Produc-
ion.
His first lecture will tell the story
f the Irish Theatre. Mr. Robin-
on's career in various roles has
,een very intimately connected
ith the evolution of the Abbey
heatre at Dublin. He has seen
he driving force of an enthusiastic
terest in drama-postulated for
he first time in a ltter signed by
villiam Butler Yeats and Lady
sregory - produce an important
ational theatre, mature in all its
,radiitions.
Expository accounts can give us
he external facts about the growth
>f the Abbey Theatre. Printer crit-
cisms of its activity can elucidate
or us the nature of its achieve-
nents and the more obvious rea-
ons for its success.
But only someone like Robinson,
who has written and produced
lays there, and at all times been
in close contact with it, can relate
he more influential motives. Ideals
he theatre must have had that
were never too clearly postulated
est their difficulty be deplored.
Now that the theatre has reached
its maturity and been assured per-
manence by governmental support,
Mr. Robinson, at present director
of the theatre, can dare to de-
scribe exactly the dreams Yeats,
Lady Gregory and Synge dreamed.
CERCLE FRANCAIS.
The Cercle Francais is closing its
season's activity tonight with per-
haps the most ambitious dramatic
program it has ever attempted.
The twelfth century religious
play Mystere D'Adam, the first
play to be written in French and
played outside the church, will be
resurrected with full striving in
architectural detail and in singing
accompaniment for historical ac-
.curacy. The text used, however,
will be a modern translation of the
original by Prof. Henri Chamard
ofr nhaSorbonie, who is at present
teaching in the University. Prof.
Chamard will preface the presen-
tatiold'f the play' with a talk on
the- play's historical significance
together with a short sketch of his
experiences in compiling the source
materiaA for his work. I
Incidental music, appropriate to
the play, will be offered by a Latin
choir off stage. W. C. Titcomb of
the architectural school has de-
signed the settings, representing
Paradise, the Inferno and a church,
all of them on the stage at the
same time.
The evening will close with a
presentation of Les Precieuses Ri-
dicules, Moliere's brilliant exposure
of affectation's stupidity. The ela-
borate mannerisms of the French
seventeenth century euphuists stim-
ulated Moliere's critically comic
spirit to the most sure-fire farce

he ever wrote.
o----
THE RIVALS.
Mrs. Fiske - a flesh-and-blood
Fanny Cavendish, revelling in a
whirlwind tour-will stop at Ann
Arbor tonight in a revival of her
revival of Richard Sheridan's great
sentimental comedy, The Rivals.
Mrs. Fiske won her now sub-
stantial fame through her glori-
ous work as Mrs. Malaprpp in the
150th anniversary presentation of
the rivals. The role is pretty gen-
erally adjudged her masterpiece
and judging by the success of the
present tour, her most popular one.
Supporting Mrs. Fiske are James
T. Powers, who was also in that
anniversary show, Rollo Peters and
Andrew Mack.
THE NEW MOON.
The new Schwab and Maidel
musical production, The New Moon,
having received entirely favorable
!criticisms, is settled in Detroit for
1 a month's run.
igmnd Rornbera nrolific com-

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