100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 24, 1930 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-04-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

j

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY'

..PO SIBE.A POI T- -NT-O- KILIN

'* M

NAV AVA,, RSTO RCE MOO1N SHlADIOW IN ATTEMPT
TO PHO TOGR P.S UN ECLIPF'SE FROM SPECIAL PLkI
E :.ONYSLY E&VNING SKY MAP
NITffNUA irI7 ECLIPSE
12 Nation-alities Represented : .1:*. : -
on Tour Taken During;;:, M*.....A.It wA 0
Spring Vacatio. P ~ ~ 1 AOA~

LE INDY
&M - Am

WI B I1TPo YEARSTOO LATE, SAY PROF1ESS(

VISITED FIVE

CITIES

Carlton; Wels Lauds Prpose
as Educational Project
for Foreigners.
Twenty-two students represent-
ing 12 diffieet countries. visite
several cities of the state duringl
spring, vacation on the ninth an-.
nual spring tour of Michigan,
sponsored by the Cosmopolitan
club, it was announced yesterday
by Prof. Calton F. Wells of the
rhetoric department and faculty
advisor to. foreign students.
The tour was pomoted with the
educational view of giving the for-,
eign students a more complete ;co-
ception and understanding of
American life, manners, and indus-
try.
Visit Industrial Plants.
The five cities, Hatie Creek;,,
Kalamazoo, Grand Rapids, Lansingt
and Jackson in order named, wre
visited by the, group under, tle,
-- leadership of Professor Wells, in a
chartered bus. During their stay in
Battle Creek, trips were made to
the Postum Cereal factory and to
Dr. Kelog's sanatariu.:,Indusrial
plants, educational institutions,
and municipal works, as vWll as
* several other points of interest.
were visited in Kalamazoo, Grand
Rapids, and Lansing. In addton.
the students participated in a
radio broadcast while in Grand],
Rapids. An inspection tour of thel
Michigan. State prison at Jackson'
was the last event on the program
before returning to Ann Arbor.
Wells Discusses, Trip.
of the trip Professor Wells said,
"As an educational project, I can-
not conceive of the foreign students
getting more in the way of knowl
edge concerning American life and
* institutions within the given time
than is crowded into this four and'
one-half day tour. It is a many-
sided experience. American indus-
tries and American business men
are seen at close range. Schools are
visited. But the most important
part of the acquaintancship with j
American life is assuredly the home ,
entertainment provided. In this
atmosphere of informal, friendlyt
hosp4,itt, convrsatipn is. stinu-
latedrd'real -accquailitanceshipI
made possible. It is wholesome and
illuminating for the boys to meet
capa1, wl-balanced, broadly edai
ca ed AMerians; and in turn, it i
good for the, hosts to know these
student-ambassadors who 'have
come tq} American, to. Michigan, to
study.
"Another lasting value of the
trip comes as a natural conse-
quen ce. of the intimate association
fthe group of students during theI
vaca tiora of travel. And when thet
boys sing Michigan songs (many,
,f ~learn them on the trip for'. the first,
tinme}, they often, for the first time,
- sense what -their Alma Mater may
1xetan to, t em in awarm and per-
sonal way. It is their first expe -
rience, usually, with the happy,
carefree comaderie of college life,"
Professor Wells add.ed
Forty-three students -received the
grade of "A" in gelogy courses
during the winter quarter, Dr. J. E.
Carman, chairman of the depart-
met, ,announced.t

D~AN QS. DAKOTA '3 ....v.*
p© O WYOMING y , ":
SAW N .>
N'G"
it

1 1Lipoiiitm~ent o RdyrdKplin tois also a passibility of the appoint-
jLhe post of poet-laureate of Eng- mnent of John Masefield, whom he
Inaugauration_ of World's Fastest; land, an office left vacant by the dlescribedl as a "very delightful
Airai RoteIsLinyrelcent death of Robert Brides, country squire who would do the
Airm n ac~e Is' s Prof. Oscar J. Campbell, of the
Newest Flight. ;English department, said yester- honors well but who is absolutely
___ da~y that "the appointment would g one on the old barroom days."
-WILL TAKE OFF SUNDAYI have been a good one if it had been'? Bridges, who died Monday, was,
-'made 25 years ago. during the spring of 1924, a resi-
By v.4socwt'd Press} 1 "Kipling," Professor Campbell, dent of Ann Arbor and poet-in-
NEW YORK, April 23-Inaugura- continued, "has not written env- residence for the University on a
tion of the worlds fastest inter- thing of particular value for a fellowship which was advocated by
national airmail service is the next quarter of a century. The honor of former President Marion L. Burton
taskto wichCol.Chales . 'the office of poet-laureate shoulds and which had previously brought
tae towibehi. ChalengA.sind be a crown to the most distinguish-; Robert Frost to Michigan. Al-
~, brghwii bed hi fling skll. ed living English poet and I do not'} though he failed to make as much
He will fly to Miami, Fla., Thurs- think Kipling is." direct contact with the students as
day in the plane in which he set aI Prof. Peter M. Jack, of the rhet- his predecessor, Bridges made sev-
trans-continental speed record last- oric department was of similar eral important speeches and work-
Sunday. There he will take overj opinion and added that "the Labor. ed steadily. He was, according to
the controls of a Pan-American. government is not in symapathly Professor Campbell, a man of
with the imperialistic policies of "great intellectual fore- and liter-
Airways mail plane for a flight to; Kipling and will. probably let the ay ability combined with the ut-
Havana, Cuba, and thence across matter lapse for a year or' two." most independence of mind."
4ne.t., ar"4n .; lht ~ ea, o IT91(1 1'14 'iiC f'LU . .

Planes will be used by scientists to photograph the eclipse of the

'~ Cristo ba, Canal Zone.
The flight. from Havana to Cris-I
4 ~tobal will mark the first stage ofI
1 a new fast mail, service between
~ North and South America which
will provide a schedule of one. week I
between New York and Montevideo-
and Buenos Aires.
Plans, announced by J. T. Trippe,
pesrdent of, the Pan-American Air-
w'ays, calls for Col. Lindbergh's
flight' to Havana Saturday with!t
Assocate~d Press Phtt 'ma-il which will bear a specialX
esun AprP2?8. Map shoes path! cachet commemorating the occasion

4 WROPOW44 I - I

left,. Lieut. L. E..Cheres (left) and J. M. Haase, will race the shadow of thc moon from Honey lake, u lationfrmgvrmnaaddi
Cal. Mrs. Isabel M Lewis, naval observatory astronomer, will also' usea plane in photographing the poatcfialsofe Wn ashndodi
ecpset He wil take off at 6 a. m. Sun-j
day accompanied, by a co-pilot andI
$20R no"rns E A U H R I OHIO STATE UNIVERSITYIn ; a 'radio operator on the flight :to
ordr t deermne he ercentage !Cristobal. 'After , a 600-mile flight
FLAMING TORCH of deaths which occur duringI over the Caribbean the plane will
Ffgedom to Dentist months in which there are, flies as j land at Byrd Field, at Puerto Ca-
I(By Associated Prss compared to those in which there! bezas, Honduras, for fuel, then con-
AU TNie . p in2. A f a - a e n t, s u e t f b t xy and jti ue across. another 6 0 m iles of I
i CTaptureo by BanditsjAUTNTe.Api23-fa-arnosunt ofbt
______ ng torch of oil today marked the biology are studying the tombston es1 sea to Cristobal, arriving therie at 6
(By Associated Pres site of No. 1 Simnons gusher, which in the local graveyards. p. i.
MEXICO . CITY, April 23.-Dr. caught fire Tuesday night in the t' :- ~o .c} t c c
George Edward Purnell, American Chapman oil field as it blew in un-I
dentist, who was kidnaped near expectedly.
GaaaaaSnawareesdjTewell, owner( by R. L. Marts j
by his captors outside Ga ala suddenly began shooting petroleumf
GudaaarounamwsreeseaTe 15ept bov,1 eethe cown ' AIS.mNG '0RI 5 '~
late Tuesday night on payment o , et f181 et h i
4.00, pesos (about $200). Dr. PurnellI block. The liquid caught fire from 0
reached- Guadalajara at 1 o'clock;I a nearby boiler used in the drill--
this morning. ing operations.
Dr. ~urell as he hirdAme- -Authorities believe from 3,000 to
icanwithn th pas monh tobe5,000 barrels of oil daily are being
I consumed by the flames. Twelve:,
t'kidnaped by. bandits and then later. boilers, all available in the field, (^ T A
released. The. first. was J. E, Eris-i have, been connected to a steam ~l ~ ~ I I N I ~ Yf
tow~~~~~~~~ Tea iigmn h a line, and workmen are shooting live
released at the end of three weks steam into the hole in an effort to i
on payment of ransom while the ;extinguish the fire. v f
second. was. Leonard Cassidy of I
Peabody, Mass, who also was final- IOWA SETS NEW RECORD. } i"t
ly relased.IOWA-For the twelfth consecu- !i1111,.
Dr. Purnell was released through tveyea h nvriy of Iowa-;
the. efforts of, Raleigh A. Gibson, has brok~en the record of attend- 0
Amercanconsl,-Wiliam . Lw-once for the year previous. At pres-~
ton, American vice Consul, two s ent, of the 9,705 students enrolled,; t iet tr thni-govhtyull ieMtiro i
other Americans and two Mexicans.:'h literary college ranks first with 1 her day, or come in here and _nut all your gift worries at An
___________15,339; and' the graduate school,,
SMIH CLLEE-oretha Isecond 'with 2,115 students enrolled end by selecting it. from our larme and varied stock.
200 bicycles are in daily use here°
due to an auto ban and the great
distance between classes. I RE~NT A RADIO
' I CROSLEY-AMRAD Arcade JewelIry
L. G. BALFOUR CO. ~o IKESACD
1121 South University SHO NIKoLSARCDE,
11ATERNITY JEWELERS ; 615 E. William' Dial 22812
:' lliIiilli11U lIIII I IiililiI''I c.EPo ~ ~ o~~c ~ ~
' orkey Sanard, Mgr. - - -, ' - - ------- - - - -- -
c~:C>~TOURISTS
THIRD CLASS
COUNTRY IU s
jO nWr , ud 1r) "ut ,a Real Low Pric y Taut' BO K NWAU H RZ DSE SIPky
SE. C. KEGLER, All Lines ii
I - 601 E HURON. ANN ARtBOR.0 0 0

.r
} '-
®:. ,.

dt. .S.VCoS-t tat ev erlo''e
nc ook ol 1Ur Pl tin Cass'~
VO~,Ud 1 t' ore 13.uro duth a ~Ct, b Yn
S,6 TCAt t he - "Y to rt t er Secoi~ n
e bt" of" the - olc.Sen. orclthe . ".'
S. S. 12. f -rpe
accn SouTCAS pcalwkYsak
Alphap Detjos
to I~t t re iaal,.""

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan