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April 24, 1930 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-04-24

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ESTABLISHED
1890

p r

ito

41P

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. XL. NO. 143

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN,

THURSDAY, APRIL 24, 1930

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

EXPERT TO BEGIN'
STUDY OF CAMPUS
DRAMASITUATION
Geo. Quinby, Savannah Theatre
Director, to Investigate
Dramatic Societies.
IS BOWDOIN GRADUATE
Move Is Step in Development
to Culminate in Campus
Theatre.
As the first step in the develop-
ment of a University dramatic or-
ganization which will culminate
with the perfection of a University
theatre, George H. Quinby, director
of the Town theatre of Savannah,
ea., has been engaged to visit the
University for a three-week period
comencing May 24. for the pur-
pose of studying the dramatic sit-
uation here and of making recom-
mendtions for ways in which the
various dramatic organizations can
better co-operate for the more ef-
ficient functioning of the Univer-
sity dramatics interests.
Quinby Will Form Plan.
Mr. Quinby will, study the work
of Play Production, Mimes, Comedy
Club, and the Hillel players, with
a view to devising a definite plan
whereby they will be able to best
co-operate through the use of the
Lydia Mendelssohn theatre, which
became a University-owned campus
theatre April 1.
No reorganization of the drama-
tic department is anticipated as a
result of Mr. Quinby's visit, it is ex-
plained by Prof. 0. J. Campbell, of
the English department. He will be
here only to survey the present
si'ttation with the unbiased eye
that only an outsider can bring to
bear on the problems which are
lmmidiately faced in the program
toward ultimate development of a
University theatre organization in
which student written plays, as
well as professionally written
drania, will be given careful and
expert Production,l it was an-
nounced.
Campbell Praises Windt.
"The University's dramatic or-
ganization is now ready for such a
survey as that Mr. Quinby will
make only because of the work ac-
complished by Valentine Windt,
director of Play Production, and
other men conpected with the dra-
matic interests," Professor Camp-
bell said yesterday. He said that
the co-operation between student
dramatic clubs and the depart-
ment had dlone much to further
developmentdof University drama-
tics.
Mr. Quinby is a graduate of Bow-
doin college, and later attended
Professor George Baker's drama
workshop at -Yale. He was asked
some weeks ago to come here for
the month of May, but was unable
to accept because of engagements
in Savannah and with the Hamp-
ton Players on Long Island in the
slimmer. Later correspondence re-
sulted in the present agreement,
whereby Mr. Quinby will be here
from May 24 until about June 14.
He was strongly recommended for
the task by Professor Baker, of
Yale, since he has done both writ-
ing and producing, and is a young
man who will be able to approach
closely the point of view of the
students concerned.1

T HREE MEN KILLED
I'N PLANE ACCiDENT
Prominent Pilots Perish When
New Diesel Plane Swerves
Into Hillside.
(By Associatcd Press)
ATTICA, N. Y., April 23.--Three
men, one of them a leader in avi-
ation circles, met death as their
airplane crashed against a hill in
a blinding snowstorm here today.
The dead: Captain Lionel Wool-
son, aeronautical engineer of the
Packard Motor Car Company of
Detroit and designer of the Pack-
ard Diesel airplane motor, Charles
S. Knight, a test pilot for the Ver-
Ville Company of Detroit, manufac-
turers of the plane which crashed
and which was equipped with one
of the new Diesel motors, and Har-
old D. Scutt. Douglastown. N. Y..

EFFINGER WILL OPEN ANNUAL
SCHOOLMASTERS' CONVENTION

"College Entrance Requirements'
t"
will be the central discussion topic
at the first of a series of 24 profes-
sional conferences which will make
up the bulwark of the Michigan
Schoolmasters' club program last-
ing through today and tomorrow
The conference, opening at 2:30
o'clock this afternoon under the
direction of Prof. Philip E. Bursley
of the Romance Languages depart-
ment, will have as its principal
speaker Dean John R. Effinger of
the literary college; he will discuss
"Entrance Requirements from the
Point of View of the Liberal Arts
4College."
Other lecturers featured on the
opening conference program are
Lewis M. Gram, of the College of
Engineering, speaking on "En-
trance Requirements and the Col-
lege of Engineering"; and George
E. Carrothers, Director of Univer-
sity Inspection of High Schools,
reviewing "Curriculum Offerings in
Secondary Schools Accredited by
the University of Michigan."
"Offering the strongest, most
thorough, and most varied pro-
grams since the founding of our
organization in 1866, we anticipate
entertaining 3,100 high school and
rural teachers coming to Ann Ar-
~--- --~- ~~~~~___ - ---
WOOD TO LECTURE
AT CAMPUS OU
Sociology Professor to Address
Meeting on The Breakdown
of the Family.'
WILL DI5oCUSS DIVORCE
Using as his subject "The Break-
down of the Family," Prof. A. E.
Wood, of the sociology department,
will address the seventh of a series
of All-Campus Forums at 4 o'clock
this afternoon in Room D, Alumni
Memorial hall.
In his discussion of the subject,
Professor Wood will outline and
explain the effects of the divorce
on the family in the present social
order. He is expected to point out
some of the causes that lead to di-
vorce as well as to comment on the
significant fact that the United
States proportionately far outnum-
bers all other countries in the line
of divorce cases. Following his dis-
cussion on how divorce effects the
socilogical conditions ofthe coun-
Itry, he will answer the question,
"Does the economic independence
of women in any way effect the
disintegration of the family?" and
"Is the family still the basic unit
of our social order?" Following this
introductory. presentation of the
subject, Professor Wood will call
for response in the form of ques-
ftions from the audience.
According to andannouncement
made by Fenelon E. Boesche, '31,
chairman of the Forum committee
of the Student Christian associa-
tion, the second forum of the ser-
ies which was postponed at the last
minute because of the suddenill-
ness of the speaker, will be held
the week following the last sched-
uled meeting of the series, or on
Thursday, May 8.
Reeves on way Home
After Hague Meeting
Prof. Jesse S. Reeves of the po-
litical science department sailed on
Ilast Thursday from Cherbourg
aboard the President Roosevelt for
New York.
Professor Reeves, who has been

1 serving since February as technical
advisor to the Hague committee for
the Codification of International
Law, is expected to return to Ann
Arbor Monday.
Advance of Disarmame
in London Confe
Informally discussing the Lon-
don naval treaty recently con-
structed and signed by 27 delegates
of the five most sea-powerful na-
tions in the world, Prof. Preston W.
Slosson, of the history department,
yesterday declared, "Whether or not
the disarmament conference at
London may be considered to have
culminated successfully depends on
what one means by success. As
compared with the abortive Geneva
conference, the London agreement
is a triumph: it may even be rank-

.1
I"
wilDean John R. Effinger I
Of the Literary college, who
will open the 64th annual School-
masters' Club' convention with an
address on "College Entrance Re-
quirements" in the Natural Science
auditorium at 2:30 o'clock today.
bor from throughout the state," yes-
terday declared Louis P. Jocelyn,
secretary-treasurer of the club, in
extending official welcome to edu-
cators arriving for the three-day
program session, which opens to-
day. Mr. Jocelyn further stated that

STUDENT COUNCIL
ADDS NEW EYENTS~
TO SPRING GAMESi
Sophomores, Freshmen to Meet
Tuesday for Election of
Class Captains.
CANOE RACES PLANNEDI
Student Council Works Out New
Scoring System; M' Men
to be in Charge.
Preliminary plans for the tradi-
tional spring games, which will1
bring together the two' lowerj
classes of the University in a sched-
ule of nine events, Friday and
Saturday, May 2 and 3, were an-
nounced last night by the Student
council.j
The games will continue the ri-
valry between the freshmen and
sophomores that began last fall on
South Ferry field with the flag
rush and two individual contests.
The freshmen won the competi-!
tion and the sophomores will be
out for more than the usual ven-
geance this spring, according to!

TRUSKOWSKI BAT
HITS HOME RUN
i
Whose nome run in the 8th in-
ning with Daniels on base counted
for two Michigan tallies.
TO HEAR EDUCATOR,
George E. Vincent, ex-Minnesota
President, to be Speaker'
at Hill Auditorium.

WOLVERINES, BUCKEIIYES BATTLE.
TO 3-3 TIE AS DARKNESS HALTS
BIG, TEN OPENER AFTER NINTH

Michigan and
Play Nine

Ohio State

Baseball Teams

Innings
and Sn

in Spite of Icy
LOw Flurries.

Breezes

B v iidward L. W arner
Failing to reach a decision in nine innings of play, Michigan and
Ohio State played a 3-3 tie at South Ferry Field yesterday afternoon in
the opening game of the Conference season. Despite the icy breezes and
continual snow flurries, a crowd of more than i,ooo hardy fans watched
Ohio keep the lead for eight innings, when Michigan attained a 3-
advantage only to have the Buckeyes tie it up in the ninth. The umpires
called the contest on account of darkness after NMichigan completed 'its
turn at bat in the ninth.
Dick Montague and Wrigley of the invaders engaged in a pitching
duel for seven innings, when the Ohio sophomore lost control and
was relieved by Kermode. Michigan was behind, 2-I, going ito the
eighth, but Joe Truskowski poled out a home run with Daniels on
base to give Coach Fisher's crew the lead. With two down and two

I:

1,500 teachers have already regis- class leaders. A An L ALu wLRukLA
tered in advance through the mails, Canoe Races Added. 500 WILL BE PRESENT
in order to insure receipt of badges Two new events will be added to5
and tickets, the underclass struggle this spring.
Featuring the entertainment ar- Canoe races for picked teams rep- George E. Vincent formerly head
ranged on today's program for the ! resenting the two classes are be- of the Rockefeller foundation and
delegates is a complimentary per- ing arranged to precede the tugs- one time president of the Univer-
formance of "The Wild Duck", to be of-war Friday afternoon. These .
presented by Play Production at events have been included to make ; sity of Minnesota will give the ad-
8:30 o'clock tonight in University this^ day's activities a more corm- dress at the honors convocation rt
Hall Auditorium. Delegates may se- pete water sports program, coun- 4 o'clock Friday afternoon in Hill
cure tickets by presentation of cilmen state. auditorium when the scholastic
badge. A new system of counting the of nearly 500 students of the
events has also been arranged. A feats
T total of 15 points will be awarded. University will be officially recog-
U IL U I V UI IA The two canoe races, the two tugs- nized.
of-war by the picked teams of 50The newly elected members of
will each count one point. The Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi,,
TLE CT V LS free-for-all tug will soe t wo and several other honor societies
points as will the obstacle race, the will be announced at the convoca-
cane spree, and the pillow fight tion,. Graduating stdents who
on Saturday morfing. The fina have maintained a hig' sco ast c
Professor Henry C. Moehlnan to contest, the "hog-tieing" event will average during their college career
t Discuss the Situation count three points. The .last four will likewise be given recognition.
of Christianity. events will be held on South Fer- Mr. Vincent has had a broad and
ry field. distinctive experience in the edu-
I S.C.A. SPONSORS SERIES Captains to be Elected. cational field. For 30 years he was
.C .PR EMeetings of the two lower classes actively connected with the Chau-
Pro of to elect captains for the games tauqua system, and served as its
Pof. Henry C. Moehlman, of the( will be held next Tues1ay. Theprsdnfrm97 o91.ine
-Rochester Divinity school, will de- wilbhednxTusa. hei president from 1907 to 1915. SinceI
liveaseri ofn f ourlecturs on re- freshmen will meet in the evening then he has been honorary presi-
liver a series of four lectures on re- and the second year men in the af- dent.
ligious topics beginning Sunday ternoon. The meeting places are to He was associated with the Uni-
night at Hill auditorium, it was an- be announced later. versity of Chicago 1892 until 1911,
Enounced yesterday by the School President Ernest C. Reif, '30, when he resigned the position of
of Religion which is bringing the Richard Cole, '30, and Herrold Cur -dean of the faculties of arts liter-
of Reiinwihisbign h ry, '31, of the council, will have !atre and sciences to become pes-
nationally known theologian here. charge of the events. They will be ident of the University of Minne-
The Sunday evening addresN will be assisted by the other councilmen sota. After serving six years in
1 at a convocation sponsored by the and undergraduate members of I this position he was chosen presi-
Student Christian associatibn. the "M" club, according to plans. dent of the Rockefeller foundation,
Professor Moehiman is one of the - an office which he held until re-
nation'9leading teachers in his par- centlBLAME
Singla fr, his appearce Chr s- FFIMI0
tianity, according to those arrang- O e
,ing for his appearance here. His +T RISenate Battles Over
address at the convocation will deal *tiDo d T e c s r P I
with the question, "Is Christianity Iar _______ alOR
Doomed?" The Rochester profes- (B, Associated Press)
sor firmly believes that it is niot WAHNGOApit2.Ra
idoomed, e stted inthsaanunce-C dHi d e WASHINGTON, April 22.-Real
d medtt., Warden Could Have Saved Men, concern over the prospects for con-
- j The other three lectures will be According to Charges Made firmation of Judge John J. Parker,
! given on Monday,. Tuesday, and in Inquiry. of North Carolina, as an associate
Wednesday of next week. They ; y justice of the Supreme Court was
will deal with New England Puri- (By Associated Prcss) shown today by senate leaders as
tanism as it is related to capitalism, E COLUMBUS, April 23.-Sensa- President Hoover was advised that
r education and marriage. tional charges that prison officials a close decision is in prospect.
tionl cargs tat risn oficals Senator Watson, of Indiana, the
i - could have saved all of the 318 pris- SeaoWtsnofIdnth
I Military Ball Tickets oners who died in the Ohio Peri- Republican leader, still hopeful of
onf Toa tentiary fire Monday night and anI confirmation of the nominee,cls
G Will go on ae Toay dmission from Warden Preston E. 'prted to Mr. Hoover that a close
Tikt oa Thomas that no general fire pre- on is apparent in the Senate,
Tickets for the annual Military cautions are taken at the institu- which will begin debate on the
I Ball, to be held at the Union Friday tionsreentthe d f nomation on Monday.
i night, May 2, will be placed on sale tion were read into t e record s o There was considerable discussion
today in the lobby of Angell hall lthard theirion o in the Senate over the prospects
and in the R. O. -T. C. offices near were lax in their consideration of the withdrawal of the nomina-
i the Engineers' Arch. Tickets are the lue o hma lifeidere of tion, but Senator Watson had no
priced at five dollars per couple. the vaE Nce, man life fremade such reports back from his White
by A E. iceColu bus ire chief. House visit.
The warden blames the state for ------------
%Int Cause Achieved ' overcrowding the prison to almost-
twice its capacity. F. A. Compton Outlines
?rence, Declares Slosson Chief Nice declared that all the Purchasing Problems
victims could have been saved if
----they had been released from theirI
cells as soon as the fire wasdis- Summarizing the problems en-
SJapan in the near future d that eqitered in the purchasing de-
has been averted; building pro- covered. He told the board ta1 partment of a large company, F. A.
grams have been materially re-- must have been undue eay Compton, chief assistant purchas-
duced; the United States has because the first alarm came from oing agent for the Detroit Edison
achieved substantial parity in naval a box outside the prison wall.comant grte DtrituEdon
company, gave a brief lecture on
strength with the British; and "Scientific Purchasing" last night at
France and Italy have adhered tC :jthe Union before the student
the agreement, although they have O0urWeatherMzaXL branch of the American Society of
not reached a formula for their owr 1; I Industrial Engineers.

SENIOR CANES.
Senior canes are on sale at
Wagner's today for the Cane
Day ceremonies to be held Sun-I
day. Canes may still be ordered
for late delivery, it is an-
nounced.
EDWARDS TO TALK
6ON SPEECH SERIS
Cticago Professor Will Present
First of Four Readings
c:i Spring Program.
WILL APPEAR TUESDAY
Prof. Davis Edwards, of the Uni-
versity of Chicago, will appear at
the Lydia Mendelssohn theatre
next Tuesday night to inaugurate
a series of dramatic readings
sponsored by the speech depart-
ment, and under the direction of
Henry Moser who announces that
four readings will constitute the
spring program.
Professor Edwards will present
"The King's Henchman," by Edna
S. Vincent Millay, which is consid-
ered to be the best of his reper-
toire of six recitals. Professor Ed-
wards is the head of the depart-
ment of public speaking of the Di-
vinity School of the University of
Chicago and of the Chicago Theo-
logical seminary, and is a director
of the School of Speech at Chatau-

men on lase in the ninth, Straub
'juggled Baumigartner's grounder.
al1owing Weisharmer td score the
tying run.
Faulty fielding beat the Wolver-
ines, all three of Ohio's runs being
scored without the aid of a hit. In
marked contrast, the Buckeyes
flayed errorless ball, Michigan's
three runs being scored through the
medium of three solid safeties and
a walk. The Maize and Blue play-
ers committed six misplays, four
of which were chalked up against
Straub at second base.
Montague Pitches Well.
Montague did a fine job of hurl-
ing considering the support he re-
ceived, limiting the Buckeyes to
three hits over the eight and one-
third innings which he occupied
the box. Jack Tompkins connected
for three of Michigan's six hits,
getting a triple and two singles.
Norm Daniels played a good game
at shortstop wher he substituted
-for the injured Myron.;He accepted
nine chances without an error.
Cline played a flashy game at
third base for the visitors and also
contributed some good stickwork,
getting two of his team's three hits,
including a triple. Stull at short-
stop also showed well afield for
Ohio. Wrigley did a good job of
pitching until he was removed in
the seventh, restricting Michigan
to four safeties.
Ohio Scores First.
Ohio State tallied twice in the
first inning. Baumgartner was
safe on Superko's fumble and then
stole second. Stull's sacrifice bunt
sent Baumgartner to third.Fesler
walked and then tried to steal sec-
(Continued on Page 8)
BOX SCORE

qua.
On May 6, Prof. Gertrude E.
Johnson of the speech department
of the University of Wisconsin will
give an interpretive reading of A.
A. Milne's "The Ivory Door." Pro-
fessor Johnson, who has been a
member of the Wisconsin faculty
since 1910, has had much experi-
ence in other colleges and univer-
sities of the country and is a mem-

1
1
A
3
l
t
3
t
3
.l

s

ber of the National Counci lof
Teachers of English.mh
Edward Abner Thompson, of the
Curry School of Expression, Bos-
ton, is third on the series with a
presentation of Brain Hooker's;
blank verse translation of Rost-1
and's "Cyrano de Bergerac," which
will be given May 20. Mr. Thomp-
son is considered by many to be
America's favorite interpretive,
reader.
On May 27, the last of the sched-
uled readings will feature Henry
Lawrence Southwick, president of
the Emerson College of Oratory,
who will present Shakespeare's',
"King Lear." Mr. Southwick has
won enviable distinction as a read-
er, it is said, especially in the in-
terpretation of Shakespeare, many
. (Continued on Page 2)1
Windt Announces Free'
Tickets to 'Wild Duck'
Valentine B. Windt, director ofI
Play Production, announces that
there will be a general distribution
of tickets for toniaht's oresentation I

OHIO STATE AB
Baumgartner, If ..2
Stull, ss..........4
Fesler, 2b-rf .....2
Fontaine, rf-3b ...4
Fichter, lb .......3
Hinchman, cf....4
Cline, 3b ........3
*Weishammer ....0
Klink, p. .......0
Gould, c .........2
**Peppe ... .....,..0
Fry, c ............0
Wrigley, p ........3
Kermode, p.....0
**Hess, 2b ......1
Totals ........28
MICHIGAN AB
Butler, if........3
Superko, 3b.....5
Tompkins, cf....5
Hudson, lb .......4
Straub, 2b ........2
Daniels, as.......2
Truskowski, c....4
Langen, rf ....,..4'
Montague, p .....2
Compton, p ......0
Totals ........31

R
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
1
0
0
3

H
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
H
0
3
1
0
0
1
0
0
6

POA
2 0
4 1
3 0
1 0
50
2 0
1 '4
0 0
-o 0
8 1-
0 0
1 0
0 3
0 0
0 0
27 9
PO A
1 0
4 0
2 0
11 2
1 3
2 6
50
0 0
1 3
0 -0
27 14

E
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
E
1
0
0
4
0
0
0
6

Score by innings:
Ohio State........200 000 001-3
Iichigan.........000 001 020-3
*Ran for Clire in 9th.
**Batted for Gould in 9th.
***Batted for Kermode in 9th.
Summaries: three base hits -
Cline, Tompkins. Home run-Trus-
kowski. Stolen bases-Baumgart-
ner 3, - Fichter, Fesler, Tompkins,
Butler. Sacrific hits-Straub and
Stull. Struck out-by Montague 5,
by Wrigley 4, by Kermode 2. Bases
on balls-off Montague 3, off Wrig-
lcev 4. off Vlinr 1 Hit h nitrher-

relative strength."
Summing up the conference as a
whole, Professor Slosson concluded.
"As compared with pacifist hopes

t _
.__._-
+

Mr. Compton stated that the
problems of purchasing were di-
vided into three main considera-
tionns- the oualityo f the material

I

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