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April 23, 1930 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1930-04-23

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ESTABLISHED
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VOL. XL. NO. 142

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN.

EIGHT PAGES

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23, 1930

PRICE FIVE CENTS

i

HIHFILLENATED317TOHIOTBLAERI lIUAIIr FCEFAMED VIOLINIST rr
DELEGATES SIGNCHFIREENATEPT17TOHALTPRBLAZERIYI II I1 TOiu WE ILL TEACH HEREIARDNrtiEX
DR E
WOD SEA PACT FDISASTEROUS PENIT
ATLNDNMET INI SEASON OPENR " OPDP f
Defense of Conference Baseball! O P D P S
_________..__,._ I '< ' G VV 1t1}L.ai1Lc t1L J. L I

ULSION AFTER
ENTIARY FIRE;
'ONES ACTION

A

Stimson and Co-workers Will ..
Sail on Leviathan for
Home Today.
LONG TASK COMPLETED
Briand Pays Tribute to Envoysi
at Close of Three Months'
Work at Peace Parley.
(By Associated Press)F
LONDON, April, 22.-Signed and:
sealed today by 27 envoys of the five
great sea powers, the London naval
treaty of 1830 rests in the archives
of the British Foreign Office. Withf
that, the work of the delegates
who have labored in London forF
three long months was over, Secre- ,:.,,r
tary Stimson and his American co-
workers left tonight for Southamp-
ton and will sail tomorrow on the
Leviathan.
The treaty was signed in Queen
Anne's drawing room of old St.
'James Place Beginning at 10:30 :
A. m. the closing plenary session re-
quired nearly three hoursfor ad-
dressing from the chief delegates.> i"
The actual signing took less than
15 minutes.
Stimson Signs First. '
The moment of historic signifi-
cance in the disarmament move-4
ment was quietly announced by
Prhidier McDonald, the chiirman,
who stood in front of the great red
chair at the center of the confer- Fighting hopelessly against a ra
ence table and said: "We have now I the bodies of 317 Ohio penitentiary
rmached the moment for signing the volunteers are shown above attempti
treaty." Then Col. Stimson as head in recent American history. The old
of the American delegation, as is shown in the picture, within whi
sig-ning in alphabetical order, walk- occupants were either burned to de
ed to the table and dipped his slen-
der golden pen into a silver ink pot
hee en yll o 'I
e~r4 11 V t o pposte0R A[I iu WL
the first seal, from which a blue rib-
bon ran through a long row of sim- r
ilar spots of wax. Each signatureC
was filled in opposite the individual i tJ
seal of .the. delegates signing. The
other Americans followed, making New York Pastor Will Conclude
no flourishes but signing in simple, Spring Convocations With
legible, autographs: Charles G. Sprins
Dawes, Charles F. Adams, Joseph ppea .
T. Robinson, David Read, Hugh
Gibson, and Dwight W. Morrow. The Rev. Dr. Donald Aldrich, pas-
The Americans carried their own tor of the Church of the Ascension, 1
gold pens, gifts from Col. Stimson, New York city, will lecture Sunday
to the ceremony and carried them morning in Hill auditorium, at the7
away again, as souveniers. Only fnal convocation sponsored this
Senator Robinson used the officialn
pen -instead' of one of the Stimson spring by the Student council, itt
pens. was announced yesterday. SeniorsI
Briand Lands Delegates, who will that day appear on the)
Aristide'-Briand 'of France follow-campus with their class canes to
ed the Americans, and as treaty c
signing is no new adventure to him, commence the graduation activities,k
'e' grasped the stout barrel of the will attend in a body.
official fountain pen and signed I A comparatively youn man, the
qiuickly. The other envoys followed
nd.,The opteinatues follwed I Rev. Dr. Aldrich is noted as a bril-
and the. completed signatures filled 1
three and one half pages. liant speaker, and has been select-t
When the last Japanese delegate ed for this occasion principally be-
had inscribed his name with pains- cause of his profound interest in+
taking care, there came a human collee students, and for beliefs ont
touch which relieved the proceed- 1
ings of the stiff formality of pre- modern day religion.
pared addresses. Briand made a Inasmuch as the graduating stu-:
pleasant speech bestowing the offi- dents will be attending in a body,
dial pen upon McDonald. - the New York minister will make a'
SBspecial appeal to the seniors, ac-
SKBEGU N cording to word recently received
ON IRISH COMEDY from him. He has not yet announc-
First work on the production of ed the topic for his address.
"The White Headed Boy," by Len- Arrangements for special music
nox, Robinson, was started yester- numbers at the service are now be-
day afternoon when members of ing made by the committee. Dalies
the tentative cast met the author Frantz, Julliard scholar of thet
and read for him in the Play Pro- School of Music, has already beenf
duction laboratories in University secured as organist for the oc-+
hall. casion.1
Mr. Robinson comes here from
the National Irish theatre, In Dub- Will'
tin, where he is the director. Play reet cee
Production is sponsoring the 'pre- be Shown at Whitney
sentation.
The play will be presented May Presented with the original New!
,9'10, 12, and 13 in the Lydia Men- York cast, Elmer Rice's "Street!

,rown oegins at Terry
Field at 4 O'clock.
BUCKEYE TEAM FAVOREDj
Lack of Pitchers Hurts Chances1
of Fisher Nine; Visitors
Boast Great Record.
By Edward L. Warner.
In defense of the title which they
have annexed for the past two
years, Michigan's baseball team will
inaugurate the 1930 Big Ten dia-
mond season against Ohio State at

Wassily Besekirsky.
Famous violinist, who has been
appointed Professor of Violin on

4:05 o'clock this afternoon on south the staff of the School of Music at
Ferry field. However, in contrast to the University.
former years, prospects for a cham-t
pionship aggregation are rather
dim for the Maize and Blue.
Ohio State will be favored over r
Coach Fisher's team in today's op-
ener, as the Buckeyes have a for-
midable ball club. The Scarlet and
Gray team has already registered Noted Concert Master to Start
five victories this year, including
a 4-3 triumph over Purdue to begin Duties as Professor of
the Conference season last Satur- Violin This Summer.
day. Ohio has a good pitching staff
backed by a heavy hitting lineup. MADE DEBUT IN BERLIN
Pitching is a Problem.___
Weakness afield and in the pitch-n
ing box were revealed by the Wol- Engagenent of Wassily Besekir-
verines on their disastrous south- sky, distinguished violinisu, as pro-
ern trip, during which they drop- fessor of violin in the School of'
ped six out of seven contests. The Music was announced yesterday.
twisted ankle sustained by Mike
Myron in the second Vanderbilt Mr. Besekirsky's services will st'rt
game has broken up the infield with the summer session and con-
combination, and has caused Coach tinue with the regular University,
Fisher to shift his players in an year.
effort to fill the gap left by the Mr. Besekirsky was born in Mos-
star shortstop. cow where he studied under his
Dick Montague has been nomin- father, a pupil of Leonard, of the,
ated to face the slugging Buckeye.s Belgium School of Teaching. He
on the -mound 'today. He se
eo c"'a riuA again "_lcn 2'J : K._ - _ _

. ' LNil . )hio, .\prI! 22 -With the death list to 317. ivesti-
{ i(atim of the disastrotus ( )hio peiitentiarv fire last night was miarked
today by a clash between countv and state authorities over a proposal to
suspend Warden Tl. 1. Thomas until all the facts are known.
Demands fenr the Warden's suspension were made byCoonty Prose-
ctttor John J. Chester, Jr.. but the issue was shelved wher Governor
(ooper to ik tile case out i his hands by assigning the 'Attorney General
make tile official inquiry.
Investigation opened with the \'arden on the witness stand. The
board of inquiry was composed of (overnor Cooper, assistant Attorney-
General Sari Slievily, 1oseph (God(own and I I arry Ilevv, Vel fare director
11 a1 G riswold and two members of the State demenciy board, IThe
warden's testimony revealed that T'ho mas W\\atkinson, gard in the cell
---- klock housing companies G and H
where all the victims perished, re-
ATTEMPT TO FIX fused to turn over his key to the
BLAME FOR FIRE cell ranges to other guards. Wat-
kinson was suspended pending the
investigation. Later in the inves-
( ""s.cwt,'"d .tPress) Ligation, Watkinson denied he was
COLUMBUS, Ohio, April 22.- ; responsible for not opening the
Officers of the guard and mem- doors.

ging conflagration which consumed
prisoners, Columbus firemen and
ng to halt one of the worst disasters
west wing of the Columbus prison,
ch more than three-fourths of the
ath or killed by suffocation.
WYtlIlll!

bers of the forces controlling the
cell block in the Ohio peniten-
tiary where upwards of 300 con-
victs were burned to death last
night, were unable to agree as to
who was responsible for the
holding of prisoners in their
cells, it developed at the Gov-
ernor's investigation late today.
Captain John Hall, in charge
of the night guard at the insti-
tution, told the investigators late
tcday that although he was not
on c: ty he rushed to the doom-
ed ceei block within a few mo-
ments a-'ter the first fire alarm
was sounded and ordered guards
to hustle up ordere,,prison-

Inquiry Conducted.
The inquiries also disclosed: That
Thomas assigned his chief deputy,
J. C. Woodward, to take charge
within the prison wall when the
fire broke out at 5:30 p. i., yes-
terday.
That the warden stationed him-
self outside the prison to prevent
any escape.
That night guard Thomas Little
and W. C. Baldwin, just coming on
duty, had to take, the range key
away from guard Watkinson to get
to the cell where some 800 prison-
,;Qswere locke~d behid ba su1f.

Georgia on the southern ivasion, made his debut in Berlin at the The testimony conflicted with from the fast spreading fire
Ninnr N nil nir despite the fact that Michigan lost age of 17 with the Philharmonic that of Thomas Watkinson who That Little and Baldwin cold gei
~L~bL UW H LEboth contests. When facing For orchestra. told the committee that Captain no higher than the fifth tie when
Benning Infantry school, however, Later he was appointed profes- Hall gave orders not to'open the they became exhausted leang
Lneehe proved rather wild. Joe Trus- door to the cell block so that the most of the convicts In theift
CopnHles a ucaekowski, veteran receiver and three- sr of violin at the Conservatory;mstothcnvtsntefih
Coupon Holders May Purchase os, eind thee of Odessa and held the first vio- others might assist in bringing land sixth tiers to die.
Tickets Tomorrow in surt star, w be ehan-u he plate. linist chair in the quartet which; the doomed convicts from their That Ohio penitentiary guards
Art Building. In the infield, Roy Hudson will represented that institution. He re- cells, numbering 337 on both day and
Sbe stationed at first. He will also signed in 1913 and came to America night shift are required to watch
nswhere he took out naturalization4,300 prisoners, at salaries ranging
Tickets for the Architects' May bat in the cleanup position, as he hpapers from 130 to 150 dollars a. month.
Party, to be held May n the ball- hassho n bl t cnnctw t n America he has won distinc- 1 0 0fJeath Count Rises.
ing, wgo h onsLge oorowilte-,onasMeacerandperorer.D
room of the Women's League build- ichigan Lnhps State tion as teacher and performer. He TotiC t U While the investigation was un-
mng, will go on sale tomorrow in the butler, f.Oull, ss. ioappeared in New York under Stran- Cderway a corps of undertakers
Architectural building. At this time Buperko, 3b. Feler, b. sky and several times under Leo- Trspent a busy day embalming the
those who have bought 50 cent cou omkins f Fontaine rf pold Stokowsky. He travelled victims at the improvised morgue
h h couHHudson, lb. Fichter, lb. through this country with the Rus- linto which the horticultural build-
pons may present them with $5 Straub, 2b. Heft, lf. sian Symphony orchestra as con- ---- ing at the State Fair grounds had
which will entitle them to bids to I Daniels, as. dline, 3b. cert master and violin soloist. For Breakdown of the Family' Will been converted.
the annual costume ball sponsored Langen, rf. Weishammer, or many years he was associated with The number of known dead rose
rruskowski, c. Fry, c. the Rhode Island Trio and with, be Subject of Professor's today from an estimate of about
yrontague, p. Klink, p such artists as Hanns Pick and Al- Talk Tomorrow. 300 and in the prison hospital were
Regular campus sale will not be- 3aumgartner, cf. vin Schroeder. 231 mjured, 5 of whom were re-
gin until early next week, it was, At the School of Music, Mr. Be- IS SEVENTH OF SERIES ported in critical condition.
announced yesterday by Robert E. sekirsky will be at the head of the Except for the presence of sev-
Kennedy, '30A., chairman of the N E Eviolin department, taking the place " B ,, eral companies of soldiers, the last
ticket committee. DEADLINE'SET made vacant by the resignation of The Breakdown of the Family of the troops called out last night
C. Wayne Mead, '30A., is working FOR PLAY CONTEST Prof. Samuel P. Lockwood. will be the subject discussed by to maintain order, the interior of
on a panoramic drawing, showing Prof. A. E. Wood, of the sociology the prison resumed a more normal
the color and form of the decor- Extending the time limit for the 'Last blan' of Famous department, at the seventh of the appearance today.
ative treatment, which, when com- submitting of plays in the long- Routine was on schdule. The
pleted, will be exhibited at a State play competition, sponsored by the Club Fulfills Pledge' spring series of All-Campus For- woolen and cotton mills which had
Street store. division of English, the new date of ums, according to an announce- been ignited from the G and cell
While the orchestra cannot be Friday noon, April 25, was set yes- IY Associated P'ress ment made yesterday by Fenelon blocks, could not be operated. But
announced as yet, a nationally f a- terday by the play-competition ATWATER, Minnesota, April 22.- E. Boesche, '31, chairman of thethe 4,000 inmates were kept in their
mous band has agreed to furnish 'committee. Feeble with the weight of his'; cells until regular feeding time.
the music, and contracts will be The previous time limit was eighty-seven years, Charles Lock--I Forum committee. The meeting will 'Later in the day the convicts took
signed shortly. Monday, April 21, but an extension wood, of Chamberlain, South Da- be held at 4 o'clock tomorrow aft- their regular exercise in the yard.
in the date of production of the kota, stood with bowed head today, ernoon in Alumni Memorial Hall. One Convict Escapes.
Union Honors Members winning play in the competition! the last man of the famous "Last Professor Wood in the introduc- oner heckup showed that one pis-
. H r.r has made possible this increase in Man Club", while the body of Peter tory presentation of the subects
of Executive Council the time limit. The arrangements Hall, 91, civil war veteran was laid y w f are MissBn, 32, entap fm
to rest.after which he will call for re- Michael Born, 32, sent up from
for production are such as to allow ioto rest.od Cut 1929 to
Twelve members of the Executive a few days more reading time to Only one ceremony remained to sponse in the form of questions Wo Cuty i19 erve on
council of the Union were present- the judges. fulfill the pledge which bound the from the audience, will outline and officials believed that he drrg ised
ed with recognition charms at a Manuscripts may be left in the!valiant thirty-three who formed discuss the important role played himself and walked thraugh the
dinner meeting of the Council English department, the speech de- 'the club at Stillwater nearly 45 by divorce in the present social main gate. He is'said to be want-
held in the Union last 'night. The partment, or the rhetoric depart- years ago. That ceremony is a final order. He is expected to show how ecl by Pennsylvania and Indiana
charm is in the form of a gold key ment offices. toast to be drunk to the departed divorce effects the socialogical con- authorities.
bearing the Union seal. _ _members from a bottle of old Bur- ditions of the country. During the The missing men are J. B. Boone,
Those receiving the award were ;Barroom Classic undy. course of the discussion he will Clinton county, and Charles Knapp,
Kenneth M. Lloyd, '32L, president, pens Formed to "keep alive the mem- answer the questins, "Is the fam- Summit county.
James E. Thayer, '30, recording-sec- at Mimes on April 28 ory of fallen comrades," the Last ily still the basic unit of our social Before the inquiry board began
retary, Robert W. Ackerman, '31, Man's Club met each year on July order?" and, "Does the economic its investigation it made a trip to
Walter Reichenbach, '30, Harold O. "Ten Nights in a Barroom," the 121, the anniversary of the battle of independence of women in anyway the damaged cell ranges. There
Warren, Jr., '31, Leonard S. Wilson, American classic, will be presented Bull Run. effect the disintegration of the fam- members of the board found mute
'31, and Irwin Newman, '31, all of the week of April 28 to May 3 in 'ily?" evidence of the swiftness with
whom, with the exception of Lloyd the Mimes theatre. . Nomination of Parker The second Forum of the series which the flames spread.
and Thayer are chairmen of the Seats for the production are now which was postponed at the last
various departments. The following on sale. Main floor seats are priced Predicted by Watson minute due to the sudden illness of Kipling May be Named
assistant chairmen also received! at 75 cents and mezannine floor te the speaker, will be held on Thurs
charms: Joseph A. Witter, '31, Al- ;seats are 50 cents. A matinee per- (BY .ocad rss_ day, May 8, the week following the 'British Poet - Laureate
fred Palmer, '32, John Gilbert, '31, formance is planned for Saturday, WASHINGTON, D. C., April 22.. last scheduled meeting of the ser-
Albert Donohue, '31, and Irving May 3. Senator Watson, Republican leader.,i (fy Associated Press)
Cooper, '31. - predicted today after a conference LONDON, England, April 22.-
r with President Hoover, that the. Rudyard Kipling, one of the most
Senate Orders Secret nomination of Judge John J. Park- SENIOR CANES WILL BE widely known and read British
,, , , er to the Supreme Court would be .-T n t ,rnTr' v.,,. - ,writers alive today, was mention-

t
Suspension of Thomas Shelved as Attorney
General Is Called to Investigation;
Death Total Mounts to 317.

delssohn theatre. The permanent
cast will be chosen within a few
days and work with the director
will be started immediately.
Besides the direction of his own
play, Mr. Robinson has planned to
make several talks during the
three weeks that he will be on the
campus.
'Her Cardboard Lover'
L..rh -L D.... C. .....J a a'.

Scene" will open Friday night atj
the Whitney theatre for a one
nighe stand. This play, now in its
second year in New.York City, was
the Pulitzer Prize winner for 1929.1
The action of the play covers a
June night, the next morning, and
the afternoon-in which time a
man goes brute-mad, two victims
are killed, a boy and a girl are
driven apart forever, and casual

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