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March 25, 1930 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-03-25

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THLIZ VMIC H U'AN,

DAILY

TiUESDAY, MARCH 25, 1930

I

_

FIRST SIX MTHSIMORMON TEMPLES TO BE CENTERS OF WORLD-WIDE FIV R XIi~ ord Trying to Buy
OF INST RAIONS CENTENNIAL CELEBRATIONS IN HONOR OF FOUNDING Early Type Windmil
fONTINUE ON VIE- ,CONTNU.......,-.
LAUDED- IN ARTIC LE! I ' AT CAMPUS HALLSK

[NP,PL NS BIGMADE
FOR OCEANFLGT
Aviators of Many Countries
Hope to', Accomplish Atlantic
Crossings Soon.
NO SOALO HOPS PLANNED

Profss Plok PaesNew
Pr ~ ~ r P c rie e 'Administration in Daily I
New York Paper.
SEES BRIGHT FUTURE *.
s Kq
Stresses Humility and Modesty '
of President Ruthven inr
Executive Affairs.
President Alexander G. Ruthven's s
first six months of administration
for the University is reviewed by
Prof. James K. Pollock. Jr., of the
political science department, in s r
Sunday's edition of the New York -
Herald TV bune. The article esp -~....
trally points out the mnodesty and;
husiiy of the new president, e--min-
edness and leadership.
Concerning the modesty and t.
humility of .President IRuthven. .°$"
Professor Pollock writes, "It was I :
natural for Dr. Ruthven to avoidf
publicity. One need never expect
him to furnish. flaming headlines -- '
for the press. The chances are that
his regime will add luster to the World-wide jubilee of the Mormon century mark will center at the T
university's record, but his own left) headed by Heber J. Grant, church president (inset). Temples at t
achievements and good qualities Mesa, Ariz., (lower right), also will be scenes of celebrations.
will never be broadcast either by -----_-_--
himself or anyone else if he can -MI W-ll
avoid it." juileeW Mark
Writing about the changes in the IN
University since the inauguration I 00th Anniversary ,
of President Ruthven, Professxr .,.
Pollock states, "in the short space! of Relgous Gr(upl
of four months & ,completely new ( U ]L .
atmosphere has been created in te ;By M. E. Baker,
University." A. P. Staff Writer.'Employment Grows by One-half,
As a summary to the record of
Dr. Ruthven thus far, and its ex- SALT LAKE CITY, March 24. b-econd yManuacturers
pected trend, Dr. Pollockk avers, Some 700,000 "Mormons scattered of Clothing.
"One may look forward, not to over the globe from South Africa
spectacular and brilliant programs to Samoa will join together April AYROLLS GROW LARGER
and discourses, but to steady, sane,t
progressive accomplishments. It 6 in celebration of the 100th anni- According to statistics compiled
should be reassuring to the aca- versary of the founding of the from information furnished by the
demic world in particular and to Church of Jesus Christ of Latter larger manufacturing corporations
the public in general that there is DaySaints
a university president, promoted D Sisof Michigan concerning their earn-
from the ranks, who is neither It was 100 years ago that Joseph nigs, weekly payroll, and employ-
moved by the urge to secure noto- [Smith met with five others at Fay- ment from December 15 to Febru-
riety for himself or his university, ette, N. Y., and organized the ary 15, 1930, the radio industries
nor to invent new ideas every church showed the greatest increase in em-
i'lonth. Truly a new educational '.chyrch.g hs
Moesha aried wihot Ih Members of the faith in the two ployment during these months:{
Moses has arrived without the s e th i 49.85 per cent. The second largest
blare of trunpets to assist in lead- Ameridas, Europ, South Africa,
! Plesin, AmeiaHawii Ne 1increase was shown by the mne's
ing us into the promised land." Palestine, Armenia, Hawaii, New h industries, 45.5 per cent.
Zealand, Australia, Samoa and clothing idsre,4. e et
Zewhere, Awsill, mem and rThe greatest decrease, 39.7 per cent
elsewhere will meet and hear a was suffered by the structural iron
message from the mother church industries and the second greatest,
Fitheir own language. 18.4 per cent by the farm imple-
' R'MThe first presidency, successor to ments industries.
S Joseph Smith in autho The radio clothing industry insti hen
y U,, 'er J. Grant, president, and two mens clothing industriesshowd
counsellors, Anthony W. Ivins and the greatest increase in payroll,
Charles W. Nibley. 59.7 per cent and 52.7 per cent, re-
Fifty Members Leave Dunedin The seven great temples of the spectively. Cigar and cigarette in-
on City of New York for church are in Salt Lake City, Laie, dustries ranked third with an in-
Trip, Via Tahiti. Hawaii; Cardston, Canada; Mesa, crease of 4 per cent. Tobacco prod-
TiV Tat1Ariz., and Logan, Manti, St. George, ucts, other than cigar and cigar-;
(ly Associate Press) all in Utah. ettes, had the greatest decrease,
DUNEDIN, New Zealand, March The celebration will center here, 24.7 per cent. Structural iron in-
24-Carrying 50 members of the where the centennial conference dustries' payroll decreased 21.2 per
Byrd Antarctic Expedition home- will convene in the famed Mormon cent.
ward, the bark City of New York, tabernacle. This gathering annual- The greatest increase in weekly
flagship of Rear Admiral Richard ly attracts thousands from the earnings, 105 per cent, was shown
E. Byrd, sailed Sunday afternoon west and southwestern states. by the piano and organ industries. i
from Otago Harbor for Tahiti, en For a week programs will be held Automobile tire industries showed1
route for New York. in the tabernacle, while each eve- the second highest rise, 38.5 per
Admiral Byrd was among a crowd ning a pageant, depicting some cent. The greatest decrease was
of more than 10,000 that thronged phase of the development of the suffered by the woolen and worsted!
the wharves to say goodby. He is sect, will be presented. Anthony C. goods industries, 19.9 per cent.}
remaining here for a few days to Lund and Tracy Y. Cannon will Tobacco industries other than
complete business affairs and will I play the famous tabernacle organ cigars and cigarettes, and the stove
travel by mail steamer homeward, for the pageants. industries showed second and third
rejoining the City of New York at Proceedings will be broadcast greatest decreases with 17.5 per
Panama. He bade his shipmates from KSL here. cent and 17.4 per cent, respectively.
farewell before the tug took the Historical localities of the rei-' The pottery industry showed the!
Pushing out into a gray mist andgion such as the Hill Cumorah in least change in both employment
bucking a stiff easterly breeze, the New York, where the gold plates and weekly earnings, 0.1 'per cent
Byrd flagship, after 16 months in of the .Book of Mormons were said increase in the former and 0.1 per
thed waes , under te Southern to have been found by Joseph cent decrease in the latter. The ice
Cross, started the expedition's jour- Smith, also will be the scene of cream industry showed the least
ney home from its conquest of the I observances. change in payroll with no notice-
South Pole by air, and its triumphse able change at all.
in the fields of exploration and sci- Professor Jotter Back
entific research. The steamship F Meets YALE UNIVERSITY - Contrary
Eleanor Bolling will follow in a few ChicagoMe evidence presented by a pol C
,,,,,,, Fof the students at Yale, there is

Oil Paintings Wood Engi
Reprodu~ctions of Mast
Feature Displays.
BOOK CUTS TO BE S
Photos cf Architecturalr
Pictures by Local Art

ravines,
tters,

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Shown in Alu ni Hal.
Five art shows of various natures }
7 r continue on exhibition through thist
week at the several galleries about f.7-.*
the campus. E
A group of paintings from the
annual winter exhibition of thef
Chicago Institute of Arts may be
wI , seen in the west gallery of Alumni
Memorial hall. A collection of
K twood engravings by Claire Leigh-i
I ton occupies the exhibition cases
in the lower corridor of the archi-
tectural building. On the third floor1
exhibition hall of the same build- Heiry Ford is battling the city
ng are hung a number of photo of Cleveland for the above old
-_ ----- graphic enlargements of the archi- windmill built at Cleveland to gen-
tectural sculptures of Lee Lawrie' . w lcbuilt at an to gen-
abernacle at Salt Lake City (tpper Reproductions on Display srate electricity in an early day
Cardston, Canada ( ower left) and The Fine Arts section of the power house in the world Ford
Michigan Academy of Science , wants it for his collection of an-
- ------ Arts and Letters, sponsors an exhi- wants it forvhis c tion ofin-
tqebut Cleveland citizens think
bition of the work of Michigan ar- '
Mellon Marks 75th ts in the North and South galler- it ought to stay there.
B .bies of Alumni Memorial hall, while B
Birthday by Leaving in the Fine Arts reading room on
. the first floor of the same building
Desk for Home City a group of reproductions of old
masters are on display. RlT
(By Aacia tPress) The group of paintings chosen I
WASHINGTON, March 24_-With from the Chicago Art Institute's
annual mid-winter show includes
quet and unobtrusiveness in keep- the works of many well-known I Bodies of Borland and Eielson
ing with his character, Andrew W. American painters. It may be seen
Mellon, today observed the sev- daily until the Easter recess. Finally Reach Seattle
enty-fifth anniversary of his birth. Included in the exhibition of For Last Rites.
The care of guiding the financial Claire Leighton's wood engravings
destinies of the world's richest n1- are cuts used to illustrate special (By Associated Press)
dstinwere lft ehind' andhe sen- editions of Hardy's "Return of the I SEATTLE, March 24-Seattle paid
tion were left behind and the slen- Native" and "The Bridge of San final tribute Sunday to the memor-
der little man, whose vigor seems Luis Rey," by Thornton Wilder. ies of Carl Ben Eielson and Earl
undiminished by the years, re-The collection also includes several Borland, Arctic aviators who went
und tmittsburghy the ityrs r- engravings of French scenes . It to their death in an airplane crash
ford lifetehsbee thiy home. may be seen through the end of I near North Cape, Siberia, last No-
for a lifetime has been his home, the present week. vember. They were attempting a
He looked back upon a life Faculty Contributes flight from Teller, Alaska, to the
crowded with activity, first in the Lee Lawrie , whose sculptures fur trader Nanuk, icebound at the
field of finance and then in that of may be seen in photograph through cape.b
oerfnenwhich than broght 'Friday of this week, has done most The bodies were recovered after
Government, which has brought of his work in conjunction with months of searching and brought
him world-wide renown and made buildings designed by the late Ber- to Seattle by plane, train and ship,.
him for nine years the center of tram Grosvenor Goodhue, well- the steamship Alaska bringing them
one of Ameica's never-ceasing known architect. Some buildings here from Seward, Alaska. The
political controversies. {which bear Lawrie sculptures are Alaska arrived last night many
Entering public life at an a e the Harkness Memorial, at Yale; ours overdue, having been buffet-
when most men count their days rf the Los Angeles Public library and ed by head winds contiually on
activity as past. Mr. Mellon became the new Nebraska state capitol. Thebtrip south. tak f th
a member of President Harding s Many faculty members are rep- ship and escor tdbciend milie
Cabinet in the trying post-war 1resented in the exhibition of Mich- shipran.coe by civil th m ii-
days, served under President Cool- igan artists in the west gallery f tarhorganizatios to the mortuary,
idge and now under President Alumni Memorial: Prof. Jean Paul draped coffins until the services.
Hoover, giving him the distinction Slusser, Prof. Ernest H. Barnes, Borland's final resting place will
of being the only man in history Prof. Myron B. Chapin, Maestro be a cemetery in Seattle, the home
to hold the Treasury portffolio un.. Valerio, Victor V* Slocum, and RosI of his parents, while Eielson will be
der three Presidents. coe L. Wood, all of the College of interred at Hatton, N. D., his boy-
In Washington, he has lived Architecture, are contributing ar- hood home. The body will be taken
quietly. He walks back and forthi tists. Other faculty members who there in a special railroad coach
each day between the Treasury and exhibit works in the show are Carle- with a detachment of the North
his apartment, near DuPont Circle ,ton W. Angell, University sculptor; Dakota National Guard as guard of
enters but lightly into the social Prof. Avard Fairbanks, teacher of honor.
life of the Capital and spends eight sculpture; and Wilfred B. Shaw, When the Alaska docked, Mr. and
of ten hours a day at work. He director of Alumni Relations. This I Mrs. W. E. Borland, parents of Bor-
shuns publicity and makes but ew exhibition, which includes work in land, and Miss Adeline Eielson, sis-
speeches. almost all of the types of art, will ter of the flier, went aboard to
The storm of dispute that has last through the end of the month. meet relatives who had accom-
raged about his head since he first panied the bodies to the states from4
took over the Cabinet post has been M. I. T.-The enjoyment of work Fairbanks, Alaska. Ole Eielson,
to him a source of little worry. was named as requisite to a bril- father of the pilot, returned with'
First he was assailed as unquaii- liant career of an engineer by a the body of his son. Mrs. Earl
fled for the Treasury post because f professor of physics at the Massa- Borland, with her two small sons,
of his industrial connections. Dis- chusetts Institute of Technology. also came south.

(Pry Asseci.ted Prss)
NEW YORK, March 24-The gulls
which wheel in lazy flight over the
North Atlantic airlines will have
visitors again this spring and sum-
mer if ambitious plans announced
by fliers of many countries are car-
ried through.
Four west-to-east crossings by
airplane have been announced and
three from east-to-west. The R-100
giant British dirigible, probably will
make a London-Montreal flight this
summer and a round trip cruise to
Lakehurst via some South Ameri-
can port is planned for the Grif
Zeppelin.
Heading the east-to-west contin-
gent, ambitious to win through
where only the Junkers Bremen has
been successful is Dieudonne Costes
the holder of the world's distance
record and conqueror of with Le
Brix of the South Atlantic.
Capt. Carretier is another who
hopes this summer to make the
crossings to New York, from Paris,
And Jean Assolant and his two
companions, who have already
flown from. Old Orchard Beach to
Spain, plan to retrace their flight,
taking off from Seville.
The French Air Ministry frowns
oi further transatlantic "stunt"
flights, however, and it may be Of-
ficial pressure will be brought to
block the contemplated journeys of
the three French expedition's.
Planning flights from west to
east are John Henry Mears, holder
of the round-the-world record of
23 days with the late C. B. Collyer;
Herbert Fahy, test pilot of the
Lockheed Airplane Co.; Col. Gus-
tavo Leon, Mexican army ace, and
Clifford McMillan, American com-
mercial pilot.
ADELPHI TRYOUTS
TO SPEAK TONIGHT
"Resolved: that the Philippine
Islands be given their complete
and immediate independence" will
be the subject of discussion at an
open forum sponsored by the Adel-
phi House of Representatives at
7:30 o'clock tonight in the Adelphi
room on the fourth floor of Angell
hall. The meeting will be open to
all who are interested.
Final tryouts for the second se-
mester will be held at the meeting
tonight. All applicants for mem-
bership are' required to deliver a
short tryout speech before the
House, on any subject. Members
who have been admitted this se-
mester will probably be initiated.
Librarian to Discuss
Old Printings Tonigt
Discussing "Eearly Hebrew Print-
ing," W. W. Bishop, librarian of
the University, will speak at 7:30
o'clock tonight at the .Hillel foun-
dation. The lecture will include a
review of the beginning of print-
ing in general, and a more speelfic
tracing of the printing of Hebrew
books, starting in 1475.
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA
at Los Angeles-The complete his-
tory of activities at the U. C. L. A.
was shown in a motion picture giv-
en by the Motion PictureClub the
other day.

3{
'1
1
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11
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'

cussions of war debt settlements,
the soldier bonus, farm relief and
tax refunds have found criticism Detroit Theatres
after criticism leveled at him.
But the prohibition question has
been the source of most of the at- CAS TH AT R
tacks upon him. He has been as- The Merriest Comedy Hit of the
sailed by the drys and wets alike Season!
for the enforcement policies carried H NBIRD IN
out by the prohibition unit ef BR N HAND"
which as Secretary of the Treasury BY JOHN DRINKWATER
he was the directing head. Youth and Love at their Gayest,
TODAY (ONLY

a

I

NOW PLAYING
Rae Theatre

I

"SUNNY
SIDE
UP"

Ia
?MrigI4 0pnI
802 PACKARD ST.
MEAT LOAF
AND
MASHED POTATOES
BUTTERED BEETS
BROOKFIELD FRIED
SAUSAGE AND EGGS
CORN BREAD

The ships are leaving many
friends behind them in- Dunedin.
Capt. Melville and the crew of the;
City of New York have become par-I
ticularly popular here since making
it their base on arriving in Novem-I
ber, 1928. Their adventurous trips
to the great ice barrier won the ad-
miration of all, including even the
native Maori chieftains.

- Prof. Ernst V. Jotter, of thel
School of Forestry and Conserva-l
tion, returned yesterday from Chi-
cago, where he delivered an ad-
dress on "Present-Day Trends in I
I Conservation" before the Chicago
l Conservation council. While in!
Chicago, Professor Jotter also at-i
tended the meeting of the Cook I
county Forest reserves.

.illlt l nllllllill lnlllllhlHlIlt 1lh iHIII,
RENT A RADIO I
CROSLEY-AMRAD .
SHOP
615 E. William Dial 22812 !

. I

EUROPEAN TOURS
3. days. 2 10 Idays "$40 0days "0)
~.4 dys $~ti4; days $4;G5 13 days $445.
Many owcs to choose from. Rates include
swieaand all expewses abroad. 4000
wenoers in 1920. See
KUEBLER TRAVEL BUREAU
61 E. Huron St. Phone 6412

less drinking going on at Yale than1
in 1910, according to a statement!
by Professor Irving Fisher of the
Economics Department. "In the
good old days a man who took one
drink a month and declared him-
self to be a drinker was laughed at.
A very moderate drinker if he used
two glasses of beer and one glass
of whisky daily," he said in ex-
ulaining his statement.
itl 11I1IliilItt ii l~liilitIiii lili1II'
TONIGHT t
Myrty1 Ross
Players
Present
HARRYkDELF'S
= New York Success r
FAMILY
UPSTAIRS"
: i 0 n e of the greatest

MICHIGAN

I

IIIIOIII

fil HIM I

A RARE TREAT
AWAITS YOU
IN

I

All Talking-Singing--
Dancing

This stars first
al-talking picture

Ehf*#Rittlth *tl...t . . . . . . . . . ..1rrrrrrr~~rt,

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,

Ronald
Colnman
IN

STARTING
TODAY

WUERTH

SHOWS AT
2:00-3:30

GRANT
WITHERS

NIXON
MARIAN

GILBERT ROLAND
LILYAN TASHMAN
and the inimitable stage sensation

"CONDEMNED"'
To Devil's Island
with
ANN HARDING
and OLHE S
LOUIS WOLHEIM
VC {7

'i

'g

JOHN WRAY

F

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