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March 19, 1930 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-03-19

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TH E M I C HIC A N

DAILY

PAGE

CENSUS FIGURES
TO SHOW AMOURTiHF NMIIIT'

KA YE DON, BRITISH DRIVER, PREPARES FOR ASSAULT flPI IISII
ON SPEED RECORD ON FAMOUS DAYTONA
r . .c i }.. . . s.'}".... . . a ak FOR NELIRAR

MORRISON MEETS LIRENCH PROFESSOR
WITH COMMITTEE
Knudson to Discuss Student Life
at University of Paris

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Administration Officials Await
Results From Nation-wide
Survey of Workmen.
POLL BEGINS IN MONTH

Effect bf Recent Dep
Including Stock Cr
to be Determined.

ression
ash

(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, March 18- Ad-
ministration officials are awaiting{
expectantly the census of unem-
ployment next month, which is to;
determine the number of persons
idle in the United States as a re-
sult of economic conditions, includ-
ing the depression following the'
stock market crash.
Secretary Davis has estimatedE
that the total does not exceed 3,-
000,000, while other estimates have
ranged higher.
Upon the results of the count will
depend the measures which the
government will undertake to re-'
lieve the situation. It was pointed
out today that in the absence of
definite information, it has been
impossible to take effective steps for
solving the problem.1
Conigress to Receive Data.
A ninn ,will 1hp ,,nrcyhla r 1-, V PVnn,

Bishop Announces Preliminary
Drawings for Library
Group at Geneva.
GIVEN BY ROCKEFELLER
Preliminary sketches for the
League of Nations Library to be
erected at Geneva have been com-
pleted, it was announced today byj
W. W. Bishop head librarian. '
This library is to be part of thej
league buildings at Geneva. Three
years ago John D. Rockefeller, Jr.,
offered the league $2.000,000 for the
erection of a league library. This
was accepted and a committee ap-
pointed consisting of Senator Sen-
ior Siolaja, chairman; Dr. W. W.'
Bishop, Sir James R. Rodd. Rol-
land-Marcel, head of national li-
braries of France, Dr. Kruess, di-
rector of the libraries of Prussia,
fandi M. Raymond Fosbick, New
York lawyer.
All the governments will sendI
documents to this library for the.
use of league members, delegates,
and diplomats. The library, how-
ever, is not to consist wholly of
documents furnished by various
countries. Many of the publica-
tions will be purchased by the
league library.
Plans for the library call for 1,-i
000,000 volumes, and reading spacej
for 600 readers. Ample space for
private study rooms will also be!
provided to the delegates.
One of the five architects to draw
up plans for the building, Mr. Vago.

Prof. Roger Morrison,
Head of the highway engineer-
ing department and chairman of
the committee on methods of as-
phalt paving for the Association of
1 Asphalt Paving Technologists, has,
called a meeting of his committee l
for today. Engineers from various
parts of the country will be here
for the meeting.
GRADUATE NOTED
FOR SPEECH WORK'
Notable work in the field of gen-
eral linguistics has recently been
begun by Miss Anna McGurk, grad-
uate student in the University de-
partment of speech and head of#
the speech department at Highland
Park high school, it was yesterday

ti
'

This Afternoon.
TO USE OWN LANGUAGE
Students will have an opportuni,
ty to compare life here at the Uni-
versity with life at the medieval
universities when Prof. Charles
Knudson, of the romance langu-
ages department, gives the fourth;
lecture in the Cercle Francais ser-
ies at 4:15 this afternoon in roon
103 Romance Languages building.
'Speaking in French, Prdfessor
Knudson will tell of the fife led by
the students of the University of
Paris, which is one of the oldest
universities. As early as the 13th
century, which period Professor
Knudson will describe, the enroll-
ment at the University of Paris
reached over 6000 students who
came to Paris from all over the
world as a result of the increased
interest manifested in education
during that century.
In the course of his talk, Profes-
sor Knudson will discuss, in addi-
tion to the kind of courses the stu-
dents study, their troubles with tte
Paris townspeople, and with the
police, with whom they waged al-
most continual warfare.
Admission to the lecture is by
season ticket for the Cerele Fran-
cais series. Tickets for the remain-
ing lectures of the series may bei
procured at the door.

Associated Press Photo
In an attempt to better the world speed record now held by his countryman, Major H. 0. D. Segrave,
Kaye Don, British driver, will send his powerful Sunbeam Bullet over the sands of the ocean speedway at
Daytona Beach, Florida. He is shown with his mechanics going over the car, preparatory to a test run.
Experts believe the huge machine capable of making a speed of 250 miles an hour.

it was added, both by congress and
by the administration when data
is available as to the extent of un-
employment, the industries serious-
ly affected, the periods of time dur-
ing which employes in these in-
dustries are idle and the causes.
Sworn to keep confidential for
the census bureau information ob-
tained concerning unemployment,
the census takers will ask ques-
tions as to employment ofrall per-
sons who usually are working at
some gainful occupation.
These will include particularly
persons who ordinarily earn wages
but also those who carry on, or
have carried on, their own inde-
pendent businesses. Unemployment
in this latter class is not expected,*
however, to be found very trouble-
some.
The names of all gainful workers
who were not at work on the day
preceding the enumerators' call will'
be recorded in the canvass, but all
of these will not be counted as un-
employed. Persons who report that
they have no jobs at all will be
asked whether they are able to
work, whether they have sought a
job and the reason for being out of
work. Those who report they do
have a job but are not at work at
the time will be asked why, and
whether they are losing pay by not
being at work.
Consider Idle Periods.
Queries also are to be propound-
ed both to those without jobs and
those on layoff as to how long they
have been idle. The extent of un-
employment in the nation depends,
it was said, as much on the length
of the period of idleness as upon
the number idle.
This will be the fifth canvass ofI
unemployment, others having been1
taken in 1880, 1890, 1900 and 1910.
In 1921, President Harding's con-
ference on unemployment sought
information on the subject, but its
compilers reported only that. the
total lay somewhere between 3,500,-
000 and 5,500,000.
After the census is taken next
month, Secretary Lamont expects,
to use it as a basis for keeping
abreast of unemployment. This
will be done by a process of "Sam-I
pling" in various sections where the
worst conditions exist.

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+IO rMITUNIVERSIT Y MUSEUM OBTAINS RARE
SPECIMEN OF PRE-HISTOLIC BEAST
Michigan's University Museums .
building is now in possession of its exact proportions made known
ge o by previous discoveries. The ex-
first mounted terradactyl, the work treme brittle texture of the hones
Many Public Health Employees of William H. Bittner, a member of necessitated the utmost care in the
Suffer romYMyserious the staff. The newly displayed handling of the specimen in oxder
Suf fer From Mysterious specimen, which has been hung in to insure its preservation.
Disease. "evolution hall" on the second Terradactyls, according to Dr.
floor, Washtenaw wing, is fourteen Case, lived 55,000,000 years ago in
(By Associated Press) I the Cretaceous period, and,' al-
WASHINGTON, March 18.-Elev- feet in width, and is the result of though they have beenconfused at
en employees of the public health several weekswork inmounting times with the bird family, were no
alone.relation to that species, but rather
service are suffering from psit- fThe terradactyl is the first of its rpesembled the modern bat. This
tacosis, or parrot fever, and exper- species to be displayed in the Uni- speciment is called a Pferanodon
iments aimed at discovering the versity museum, having been found which meaa "wings without teeth."
cause and cure of this mysterious In the Chalk Beds of the Cretaceous The terradactyl lived on the fish
malady have been temporarilperiod in Kansas. Accordig to of the Cretacean sea, and was onef
bd d t th ththeab Dr E. C. Case, professor of histori of the last of its group. Some
abandoned, together with the lab- I cal geology, this specimen is one of
oratory in which they were con- the rarest creatures yet to be found Ispecimens have been found as long
by cietifc eploatin. lthughas twenty feet, although the Uni-
ducted. by scientific exploration. Although versity's acquisition is considered
But the experiments have al- only the wing bones and a few to be more than average wing
ready been partially successful, and scattered parts from the remainder spread. It has been more popu-
to their own efforts the patients found, the figure of the creature is larly known as the "great flying
bacgrondreptile"' because of its resemblance i
owe a process of treatment which is painted on the plaster background to the bat, as well as its appetite
being applied with apparent suc- for sea food.1
cess. Many of them are recovering. Spearing Season Opens The Cretaceous period is com-!
They are inoculated with a seruml. paratively recent, geologically '
composed partially of blood taken C Mgan on April 1 speaking. A table of geologic time
from other victims of the disease. in the museum indicates that ther
In addition, they have isolated the Opening of the spearing season terradactyl lived just 445,000,000
virus, an important accomplish- on non-game fish in Michigan, and years after the beginning of time.,
ment. However, Surgeon General closing of the fishing season in all!
Hugh S. Cumming says that much inland lakes of the state, on April Prof. Angell Tells of
remains to be learned. 1, has been announced in the 1930 .
Little is known as yet of how the E edition of the Fish Law Digest, be- Sociologists' Methods
disease is communicated. At first ing distributed this week to all
it was thoght tha.t infecion was state conservation nfficrs county tri~voncartii har-i thei t-na

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U announced in uata given irom the
of Budapest will visit the United
States to study the architecture of ganesrl linguistic and speech labor- Newburgh announces
libraries in this country. It is ex- Athough onl at the outset of a xperiments in Diet
pected that Mr. Vago will come to Af
Ann rborsom tim thi co i long series of researches, Miss Mc-1
Ann Arbor some time this coming Gk11 e reecs c Publication has been made of the
srn.cGurk's opening experiments have Pbiainhsbe aeo h
sprgthrown new light on the relatio laboratory and clinic discovery of
- ._ ship of lip-rounding to the activi- Dr. L. H. Newburgh, professor of
Slater Leases Buildi of u o the ti- clinical investigation, to the effect
Sla~r LesesBuiling ties of masculature of the tongue. that a diet with a high content of
Sites on.State Street The data used consists of palate- muscle fiber or protein develops
grams, made by graduate students signs of serious kidney disease,
Leasing of the property at 334- working along other lines. The The announcement of Dr. New-
336 South State St. to Sater's, Inc., revolutionary discovery made thus burgh's researchs which was made
who will remodel the building into far is that the so-called rounded in the American Journal of the
a new store, was announced today vowels of the low-back varieties Medical Journal of the Medical
by Marvin J: Slater, president. are neither low nor back in the Sciences discloses pathological con-
The two stores will be complete- case of speakers with very low pa- dition heretofore denied by previous
ly remodeled and built into an en- lated arches. reports of investigations on the
tirely new building which is expect-' The new conclusion drawn by subject, as being unaffected by a
ed to be ready for occupancy about I the Michigan research worker from lean meat diet.
Auiio 15 _%ater', resent two s+tres !her ex i t i .-Q-th t lt.f tInf_ _"°_---

i
.

g. A . pV. 4.,A. jJ.S C111,Ah V UV J tj .
at 320 and 334 South State St. will+
be combined in the new location.
Slater's, Inc., was established in I
1916 under the name of the Slater
book shop. The two stores owned
and operated by Charles W. Gra-
ham were purchased in August,
1929, and the firm incorporated un-
der the name of Slaters', Inc.
Other officers are: Vice presi-
dent, Charles W. Graham and Fred
C. Ullrich; treasurer, Robert J.
Cavanaugh, and secretary, J. W.
Edwards.
NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY1
Cuts in classes are unlimited forI
honor students here. The rule has
been made on the assmuption that
students who make the honor roll
are of a superior type that will not'
abuse the privilege.}

,ep Je s LJ. U ne palate
may be of the low-back variety in
subjects with 'high palatal arches;
this places the old speech classi-
fications of Bell, Sweet, Jones, and
Kenyon as being untrue to fact.
Engineering Faculty
Will Attend Meeting
Several members of the faculty
of the -engineering college will at-,
tend the regional meeting of the
American Society for Testing Ma-
terials which will be held today at
the Book-Cadillac hotel in Detroit.
It is the first regional meeting to
be sponsored by the group.
During the morning session Prof.
Clair Upthegrove, of the metal-
lurgical department, will speak on
"Automobile Bearing Metals."

RmENT A
I At New Low' Rates
CROSLEY
AMRAD SHOP
Phone 22812
615 East Withiam

impossible except by direct con- clerks, and license agencies. inorganically scientific 'ethod of
tact with afflicted parrots, but it According to the official state- many sociologists, Prof. Robert C.
has been proved, more over, the ment in the bulletin published by Angell, of the sociology department,
surgeon general says, that the mal- the state Department of Conserva- tells of "Social Research's Heritage
ady is extremely contagious. Three tion, "During the period from April from Charles H. Cooley"'in the cur-
doctors, now ill, had no conection 11 to May 31; spearing with o.v ith- rent issue of Social Forces,
with the psittacosis laboratory. out the use of artificial light, in all "The method of approach," said
He advances the theory that the Inon-trout rivers and streams, will Professor Angell, 'is very impor-
germs may have been spread by;be permitted for the catching of tant in social research. Many so-
particles of dust or by insects, al- 1non-game fish including bull- ciologists, today, make their stud-
though the laboratory has been Iheads, carp, and whitefish. Spear- Iies too much like, chemistry and
thoroughly fumigated and sprayed Iing for pike and pickerel will be physics. Social research requires
with bichloride of mercury. It will l permitted in non-trout streams the interpretation of mental
j be fumigated again, from May 1 to 31 inclusive." --states."
This S""pring Weather

t

LONG DISTANCE RATES
ARE SURPRISINGLY LOW
The representative rates listed below are A Station-to-Station call is one made to
for day Station-to-Station calls and are a telephone number, as on a local call,
effective between 4:30 a. m. and 7:00 p. m. '"rather than to a particular person.
You may reverse the charges to your
home telephone if you wish.

SENATE CONFIRMATION
OF TIACHERI BLOCKED
WASHINGTON, March 18.-Con-
firmation of Judge Thomas Dayl
Thacher of New Yorkc as solicitor
general was blocked today in the
senate by Senator Overman, Demo-
crat, North Carolina, who gave no
explanation for asking that con--{
sideration go over "temporarily."

i

MAKES FOLKS SORT'A

CARELESS,

From Day
Ani Arbor A Station-to-Station
To. Rates
ADRIAN -_......... - $0.25.
AKRON, 0. .80
ALGONAC __.50

Front
Ann Arbor
To:
LOUISVILLE, KY. _-. _

Day '
Station-to.Station
Rates
__________ $1.si40

os
rmap"

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BUT IF IT'S ANYTHING

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MT. CLEMENS

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M
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THAN YOUR EQUILIBRIUM THAT

YOU'VE LOST

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WE CAN FIND .IT FOR YOU.
Our Classified ads are a valuable medium

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Business
or Secretarial
Courses
Prepare for definite posi-
tions. Also train you to type
your these and notes, and
take lectures in shorthand.
New Term March 24

for a speedy solution of your

troubles.

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