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March 12, 1930 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1930-03-12

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rAov. To~

THE MICHICAN

1) AIEY

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12, 1930,

_.. -.

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board I
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
in this paper and the local news published
herei'.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
mater General.
ubscriptiol by carrier, $4.0; by mail,
$4.5o.
Aices:tAnn Arbor Press Building, May-
bard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
ELLIS B. MERRY
Editorial Chairman........eorge C. Tilley
City Editor...............Pierce Rosenberg
News Editor...............Donald J. Rline
Sports Editor.:......Edward L. Warner, Jr.
Women's Editor...........Marjorie Follmer
Telegraph Editor.........Cassam A. Wilson
Music and Drama........William J. Gorman
Literary Editor..........Lawrence R. Klein
Assistant City lEdi;or.... Robert J. Feldman
Night Editors-Editorial Board Member
Frank E. Cooper Henry J. Merry
William C. Gentry Robert L. Sloss
Charles R. Kauffman Walter W. Wilds
Gurney Williams
Reporters
Bertram Askwith Lester May
Helen Bar Margaret Mix
Maxwell Bauer David M. Nichol
Mary L. Behymer William Page
Allan H. Berkman Hoard11Piec ha
Arthur J. Bernstein icto Rbinoi i
S. Beach Conger John D. Reindel
Thomas M. Cooley Jeannie Roberts
Helen Domine Joseph A. Russell
Margaret Eckels Joseph Ruwitch
Catherine Ferrin Ralph R. Sachs
Carl F. Forsyhe Cecelia Shriver
Sheldon C. Fullerton Charles R. Sprowl
Ruth Gallreyer Adsit Stewart
Ruth Geddes S. CadwelleSwansa
Ginevra Ginane Thayer
ack Goldsmith Margaret Thompson
Gmily rimes Richard L. Tobin
Morris Croverman Robert Townsend
Margaret Harris Elizabeth Valentine
Cullen Kennedy Harold 0. Warren, Jr.
ean Levy G. Lionel Willens
ussell E. McCracken Barbara Wright
Dorothy Magee Vivian Zimit
Bruce J. Maley
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
A. J. JORDAN, JR.
Assistant Manager
ALEX K. SCHERER
Department Managers
Advertising.............T. Hollister Mabley
Advertising............lasper I. Halverson
Advertising..I.......... Shrwood A. Upton
Servcet.................eorge A. Spater
Circulation..............J. Vernor Davis
Accounts ....................John R. Rose
.?ublications ........George R. Ramilton
Business Secretary-Mary Chase
Assistants
Byrne M. Badenoch Marvin Robacker
ames Cartwright Lawrence Lucey
obert Crawford Thomas Muir
Harry B. Culver George R. Patterson
Thomas M. Davis Charles Sanford I
Norman Eliezer Lee Slay ton
Jauiis Hoffer Joseph Van Riper
Norris Johnson Robert Williamson
Chares.Kline Wiliamn R. Worboy
Dorothy Bloomgardner Alice McCully
Laura Codling Sylvia Miller
Ages Davis Helen. e Musselwhite
Bernice -Glaser- Eleanor Walkinshaw
Hortense Gooding Dorothea Waterma
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12, 1930
Night Editor, CHAS. R. KAUFMAN
MORE CAPABLE CENSORS.)
Considering the magnitude of the
United States. civil service, the
quality of men selected for most
governmental positions under this
system has been mediocre, even to
the higher offices appointed on the
basis of technical knowledge. Cus-
toms clerks have never been an
exception to this rule but rather
furnish additional proof that it is
true, yet they are 'still empowered
by law to censor books entering
the country.
This weakness has long been
painfully apparenthespeciallyat
such times when Voltaire's "Can-
dide" and Boccacio's "Decameron"
were snatched up by those smug
smut hounds who act as guardians

of our ports and permanently bar-
red from our liberal and democrat-
ic nation.
The movement to "ecraser 1in-
fame" has at last come to a head
and, initiated by Senator Cutting
of New Mexico and backed by most
of the other senators, will come
before the Senate in the form of a
bill to provide more competent
censors. Senator Couzens' amend-
ment--which was obvious and:
probably unnecessary - would ex-
clude those books which are trea-
sonable or threaten violence
against the United States.
In order to give his bill an added
impetus, Senator Cutting has circu-
lated a petition among the univer-
sities and colleges of the nation
asking various professors theirx
opinions on the matter. More than
40 members of the Michigan facul-
ty were among those questioned.
This petitioning should have
been entirely unnecessary, but the
national" legislative mind has been
too engrossed in big business and
its relative merits and faults to
pay much attention to the more
purely intellectual phase of Ameri-
can life.
If the Cutting bill is passed by
the Senate and manages to slip
unnoticed through the House. the

said in an address at Washington
at theinauguration of a five year
expansion program of the Boy
Scout organization.
Characterizing the boy and his
sister as "the most precious pos-
session of the American home," he
counseled that through the agency
of such an organization as he was
addressing the interests of the
youths should be turned to "con-
structive joy" instead of "destruc-J
tive glee."
Civic resposibility should be in- I
cluded in the academic teaching
of the youth of today, the Chief
Executive continued. President
Hoover's readiness to accept the
belief that the youth of today
could be taught to share the re-
sponsibility of the civic welfare bf
the nation is in itself an encourag-
ing gesture.
"The conviction that every per-
son in the republic owes a service
to the republic; that the republic
rests solely on the willingness of
every one born in it to bear his
part of the duties and obligations
of citizenship, is as important as
the ability to read and write-that
is the only patriotism of peace."
Mr. Hoover contended.
If the youth of today, about
whom a multitude of suggestions
have been made and to whom
warnings of an impending crash
in the moral fibre of the nation
have been issued, can grasp that
simple conviction and understand
upon what this republic rests, there
is no need for qualms about the
future.
o --
A member of the geology depart-
ment at the University of Texas
has found a fish near Dallas which
is said to be 37,500,000 years old.
The speciment is broken only in
one place and will be put on dis-;
play soon. Just wait until a cam-
pus restaurant gets hold of it.

0ATED O R G t ?
LARK
LOSES
LAUNDRY!
Lark, editor of this column for
three semesters and a summer
school, and now editor of the Books
column, has been wandering
around the office for the last three
days wearing, among other things,
a green lumberjack shirt and the
most pathetic expression you ever
saw.
"Oh-h-h-h my," he groans as he
paces to and fro, "I can't write a
Book column, I can't study, I can't
do anything. I can't even change
my shirt." Questioning him was
to no avail-he merely turned a
haggard face in my direction and
wandered away, mumbling.

_

Music And Drama

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MORE ABOUT GABRILOWITSCH.1
Mr. Gehring's admirable review
of the Detroit Symphony Concert
in the Ann Arbor News suggested a
defense of Mr. Gabrilowitsch's
"stodginess" that ought to stimu-
late discussion. It is my argument
that Gabrilowitsch's habit of facile
preference for the recognized, lead-
ing to the absolute stability of his
repertory and confining his cate-
gories strictly to the past, makes
him an unimportanteconductorein
spite of his acknowledged perfec-
tion within the boundaries of his
choice.
Mr. Gehring speaks of Gabrilo-

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I PALMER CHRISTIAN:
IN
E fvery Wednesday at 4:15 P. M. in Hill Auditorium unless otherwise -
_ announced.
COMPLIMENTARY TO THE PUBLIC
Except that for obvious reasons small children cannot be admitted.
A i ICCCCCICCCICI CCI CIII ill IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIICIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIItIIIIIIIII II II IfIllI IIIC1'

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Campus Opinion
Contributors are asked to he brief,
confining themselves to less than :io
words of possible. Anonymous comn-
mnications will ye disregarded. The
names of oninun iant s will, however,
be regarded as confilential, upon re-
quest. Letters published shoid not ie
construed as expressing the editorial
opinion of The Daily.
APPRECIATION.
To the Editor:
As one among many faculty men'
interested in student self-expres-
sion, permit me to congratulate
the'campus in general and the Hil-
lel players in particular on the
performance of "Caponsacchi." We
have for years noted with concern
the comparative indifference
shown by most students to such
activities as debating, literary cre-
ation, literary criticism and the
like, and have been all the more
pleased to note the interest and
skill which so many students have
shown in at least one creative acti-
vity-the drama. For the most part
this welcome dramatic interest has
spent itself on the lightest of light
comedy or modern parlor drama;
it is still another step forward that
a campus group should tackle the
most difficult of all assignments,
the poetic drama. That there
should be some inequalities of per-
forMance in the realization of such
an ambitious undertaking was in-
evitable; the really remarkable
fact is rather that the spirit of
Browning was seized so well. Per-
haps it may even encourage some
to tackle "The Ring and the Book"
in private reading, for though it is
the most formidable poem of the
most difficult of poets, it is also
the best detective story ever writ-
ten. Theabest, because while the
facts are all before the reader, the
"truth" which gives meaning to
the facts does not appear until
they have been examined afresh
from the angle of each important
person in the story. It is, as an
English critic put it, "an epic of
free speech," the fundamental idea
being that we cannot know the
truth as it is until we are willing
to examine the truth as it seems
to others as well as ourselves. But
I must not yield to my professional
bad habits and turn a brief note of
appreciation into a lecture on lit-
erature.
Yours sincerely,
Preston W. Slosson.
SCOFFLAWS?

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* * witscn's "attitude toward-s modern
Yesterday afternoon he'didn't music." As I see it, it is question-
show up at all and I was about to able to credit a conductor who has
dispatch a Rolls sleuth to search never attempted it with an atti-
for him when a letter arrived - a tude towards modern music. A
letter that will pull at your heart bolder, more important conductor
strings and awaken in you a feel- (like Koussevitsky and Stowkow-
ing of compassion for the unfor- ski with reservations for his vir-
tunate lad. I!tuoso aspirations) achieves an at-
titude by inclusion, by trial. The
LAMENT. boundaries of his interests are
Dear Joe: How do you go about achieved after an experience of
sueing the government? I want to some sort, rather than by a pre-
collect from the post office depart- conception or a predisposition for'
ment for damaged dignity, mental safety with established works. This
anguish, and alienation of my bold type of conductor can hardly!
laundry. Ever since last Friday I hope for the , "consistency" and
have been waiting for a laundry continual success in his repertory
case to be carried 180 miles by the that Gabrilowitsch achieves. Kous-
efficient American post. In addi- sevitsky's expansive attitude, mak-
tion, Joe, I-welll, it's a delicate ing his repertory fluid, unpredic-
tion, Joe, I-well, it's a- delicate table (and exciting), continually
and blushful matter to mention, involves him in error; for example
but I haven't any clothes. If I the critical discussion of his evalu-
wear the one shirt I have left once ation of Ravel's Bolero. But it is
more I will be taken for a Facisti my contention that his expansive-
general. I ness is more important than Gab-
Really, Joe, I have had enough rilowitsch's conservatism because
mail misdirected to be a charac- representative of a more integralj
ter in a Hardy novel. You can't acceptance of Music's organic ex-
imagine the gross indignity of istence. By simultaneously giving'
wearing a flannel shirt day after Music a past and a present, Kous-
day. I resent the practice not only 1 sevitsky objectifies its life, and frees
because its itching makes mefeel it of the heterogeneous unsubtle-
like a Franciscan friar but because ties of popular approbation.
of the social and mental humilia- Mr. Gabrilowitsch's atitude (and
tion to which it subjects me. Girls Iit is the attitude of most all inter-
who once flocked about me in an preters, cf. most piano programs)
admiring company shun me with results in what I take to be the
pointed and poignant directness. most disconcerting thing about
If this keeps up, I shall have to' music as an art: that music in per-
retire, like Diogenes, to ascetic bliss formance comes always one gen-
in a barrel. eration later than music in crea-
But I make one last appeal, Joe, tion. The result is that music, like
through your column. Won't some Professor Alexander's Deity, is al-?
one send me a shirt? ways one tantalizing step ahead {
Vale, vale, of its breeding generation. I take
Lark. it that the conservatism of such
* * ** ymen as Gabrilowitsch, however in-
What are you going to do about telligent, perverts music's right 'to
it, gents-just sit around and let an organic existence (such as poet-
him suffer? Send old shirts, socks, ry achieves even though isometimes
stamps, tin foil, or old buttons! desperately through radical jour-
Show Lark that his plight has nals, etc.) It does so by enslaving
awakened pity! it to popular approbation, whose
* * period of pregnancy has been with
The following ad, taken from exasperating consistency about one
yesterday's classified column, is a generation. Music thus becomes
much better test for sobriety than not an integral aspect of contenr-
'truly rural."' Try it yourself: poraneity (as I think it should be)
LOST-Swiss wrist watch Thurs- but something akin to pleasant his-
day night. tory, a quiet savouring of the past.
* * * ISuch musicians as Gabrilowitsch I
ODD SHOTS. consider responsible for making,
music a luxury, helping us neither
to emotional orientation or intel-
lectual apprehension of contem-
poraneity (for me about the prob-
lem of existence).

/ wTh vey note
-i
.R
\ i
leH RE'S theta.z thatuts
the Sin in "Jusinuating"
r a... It says "Come on Bafo"
with every note !
Victor Records bring you all
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THE MUSIC YOU WANT
WHEN YOU WANT IT-
icto1ieCords

I

Day
Station-to-Station
Rates

Rates from Ann Arbor t':

ALPENA........... . ...... .$1I15
BATTLE CREEK . . ....:.."....:.. .60
CALUMET................:.2.10
COLDWATER ............... .60
CINCINNATIO .......... 110
CLEVELAND, O................ .70
DEXTER ...................... . .10
GRAND HAVEN.............N .90
HASTINGS....". .... ............ ,65
HILLSDALE................... .45
IRON MOUNTAINL.............1A70
JACKSON.................... .30
LONDON, ONT.... . ............ .70V
MARQUETTE .................1.80
MIAMI, FLA....... ........... 4.25
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.......... 2.15
PONTIAC......... .............30
ST. CLAIR.. ...............5
TECUMSEH ..
Your calls will be speeded if you give the
operator the number of the distant telephone.
if you do not know the number
ask "Information."

III

MICHIGAN BELL
TELEPHONE CO
Telephone Home''
Long Distance Rates
are Surprisingly
Low
The representative rates listed below are for
day Station-to-Station calls and are effective
between 4:30 a. m. and 7:00 p. m.
A Station-to-Station call is one made to a
telephone number rather than to a particular
person.
You may reverse the charges to your home
telephone if you wish.

11

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ft

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THE BRIDE.
A Review.
Mimes registers a "success" in its
second venture by choosing a cash-
' register play-the conventional
imysterioso-comic stock company
favorite-that inevitably clicks; af-
The Rolls Photopgraph Pherret fording momentary pleasure prop-
has, contrary to popular belief, erly called vicarious an hour after
beenverycbusy these past two leaving the theatre by all self-re-j
weeks. According to his report he setn rtc.Rmrso h
ha benwiigt e itr specting critics. Remarks on the'
has been waiting to get a picture play end there, a futilitarian feel-
of a bricklayer at work on the Mo- ing being engendered by the fact
sher-Jordan dormitory. "I had to that Mimes is content to do such
wait a long time," he states, "but things.
was finally rewarded yesterday The production is quite satisfac-
when a bricklayers woke up and tory. Norma Bockelman operatic-
laid a brick.
lik * ally sings the unmaidenly lines of
the old maid aunt, which may be
Dear Joe: I noticed in yester- either right or wrong: the point
day's Daily that in order to get being that in such a play most any-
rid of a few outstanding young thing can be done and somehow
scholars on the campus they are nationalized as "in character,"
given scholarships and told to go there being no character to speak
to study in Europe. Next there is of. June Day very gratifyingly
ase of the rising scholar who fulfills promise predicted for her, i
has no standing at all and is given giving a quite charming perform-
a couple of E's and told to go ance with details all acceptably I
Hoare. worked out pretty largely by intel-
Al Kaks. ligent exploitation of personality.i
Joe Bates Smith again proves a
PICKED UP IN A. H- reliable actor, never failing to
I"How're your studies?" realize completely any line or bit
any 'ine; I don't botherthem of business that would help the
play. No actor on the campus has

-
Delicious and Refreshing
And dull care
wIthers on the vine

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To the Editor:
Is the Editor of The Daily so
sousingly "wet" that he plans to
refuse any news space whatever to
the so-called "dry" testimony be-
ing given, and to be given, before
the House judiciary committee for'
the repeal of the 18th Amend-
ment? For the past two weeks or
more The Daily has featured each

Sont be always taking your work or love
affairs too seriously. It will only end by
Proving you know less and less of more
and more.
The neatest trick you can pull is to slip
into the nearest soda fountain or refresh-
ment stand--around the corner from
sm -a m e __ a ; itv . m. r n n #h

I

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