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March 12, 1930 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-03-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12, 1930

T H MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGt THREE

r FOR POSTAL LIQUOR STATUT~J' flULWUI

SAVE EIGHTY-SEVEN
IN COALMN FREp
Two Perish When Flames Sweep
Shafts of Warner's
Wolf Run.
FEAR DOOM OF TUNNEL,
Fre Departnent's Heroic Work
Checks Blaze After I

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DR. FREDERICK COOK LEAVES LEAVEN
AFTER SERVING FIVE YEAR TERM

WORTH PRISON {51 VADI DOCTOR DEFENDS J
IBFOR POSTALSFRAUDS ORUUMS ADELIQUORTSTSATIUT Lg UWDRK\L
rty ;N " ."5,aC,;:,:.: :iirin :" '; : BUS e S [go M,, 9RTIiR

Dean C. E. Griffin Will be First
Speaker at Series of Eight
Weekly Meetings.
ALUMNI TO BE SUBJECT

Campus Advertising

company

Five Hours.I
(By Associated Press)
STEUBENVILLE, Ohio, March
11.-Cheated of'all but two victims
among the 89 men trapped in the
sioke-filled tunnels, flames lappedI
stubbornly away today in the
depths of the Wolf Run mine ofj
the Warner collieries near Amster-
dam 25 miles from here.
Sparks from the electric trolley
pole of a train started a conflagra-
tion which for hours threatened a
major nine disaster, but heroic
rescue squads, picking their way
through tongues of flames spring-
ing from timbers and coal, brought
every man but two safely to the
surface.
Fumes are Fatal.
Paul Borkowski, 65, died soon af-
tei' he was brought out. He suf-
fered from asthma and could not
survive the choking coal fumes he,
had breathed. The body of Jack
Pewoswski, 37, was found beside a
door of one. of the mine rooms.
Another miner, George Allman,
was severely burned on the feet,
legs and hips while dashing across
a barrier of fire. Two rescuers,
Sidney Wales and Arnold Horton,
inspectors of the mine, collapsed
fromexhaustion after tramping
* for miles to search for workmen.
Many -Overcome.
The 87 others cut off by the blaze
were brought out unharmed, al-,
though 70 of them owed their lives
to the desperate work of the Steu-
bnville fire department and mine
rescue squads. About a dozen of
them were unconscious from the '
intense heat and. smoke when car-
ried to the surface, but most of
them were able to walk to their
nearby homes after they had been
reviv'ed. Company officials an-
Aounced at midnight that every
man had been accounted for.
The fire broke out about 4,000
feet back from the main entrance
, shaft Monday afternoon and to e-I
phone co munication to the mines
were destroyed.
Department Makes Fast Run.
The Steubenville fire department,
made a 25-mile run and began
pumping water just in time to save
the weakened timbers from allow-
ing dirt and shale to slide in and
block the trapped men. About 70!
men were threatened, the rest hav-
ing been able to escape or were
brought out before the flameg
could cut them off.
For a time it seemed that theI
fire would be the victor, but five
hours later it was checked suffi-
ciently that rescuers, wearing gas
masks, crept through and brought
out 70 men, exhausted and gasping
for air.
The rescue was made barely in
time, for less than three hours lat-
er the flames again gained head-
way nd Fire Chief Edward Green
of Steubenville said he feared it
would be impossible to save the
mine from destruction. Shifts of
firemen were kept at their post
until night.

Kenneth Stuart, '30B.Ad., presi-
<.. dent of the Business Administra-
tion club, announced yesterday'
i ", :' fh= that the club will hold a series of
eight weekly forums .under the?
leadership of various faculty mem-
bers, beginning on March 20. The I
I ngeetings, which will open at 7:301
o'clock and last an hour. are open(
to all students.
Dean C. E. Griffin, of the busi-j
ness administration school, will be
the speaker at the first forum. Hej
will talk on the "Alumni of the
School," outlining what good their
fifth year spent in the business
school has done them, what pro-i
fession they are in, and what theirI
comparative speed of promotion is.
" .*. :.:.;.. iy ::... ....v:::$ ,.:},:.#-rr . ::<=: .:}.:: t :s.: " The , speakers for the rem ainingI
.,meetings, who have not yet an-
:,.f.. . . ..."7. . .nounced their topics, are Profes-
.::"}:.?:.7 ::::.:;., . . . r.:,;,.. f,,sors Rodkey, Gault, Paton, Fisher,
Jamieson, and Blackett.
His sentence of five years in the federal penitentiary at Leavonworth, Kansas, at an end, Dr. Frederick "One of the Objects of these fo-
A. Cook, erstwhile arctic explorer and noted figure, smiles as he leaves the prison gates. Cook, standing be- rums is to show students interested
tween two women, as pictured abyve, is telling the newspaper men about his plans for the future. Dr. Cook in business administration what
created a furor in the scientific world when in 1908, he claimed to have discovered the north pole, previous the different fields offer," stated
to the epoch making trip of Comnmodore Peary. He was sent to the penitentiary five years ago for using Stuart. "Each professor will speak
the mails to defraud, and serving Iour.teen months in p rison while awaiting an appeal on his case previous to jon his particular field. They will
his permanent assignment to Leavenwor-th. talk about the field from the stu-
_..f-..... ..":. : r_---"---- - dents' viewpoint, what opportuni-
h i ties it offers him and what his
~1JOAI '.,iiuii Uri 10CIIIII chances of getting a job in it are
iRDsentnceofive earsinthefederalafter he graduates from college.1
-is Shown 'by Survey UILThe talks will last half an hour,
fand will be followed by discus-
ypenCi eniary at oKa s s asions," concluded Stuart.s
INeated M aCfuronhsetTn ich a o eisHoLdto leei The different fields of the speak-
In the old days at the Univer- eSare banking, investment, ac-
Hastings Exhibits New Pictures sity, students didn't have such a Entertainment to be Provided counting, real estite, marketing
of Wild Life to Eastern difficult time choosing .their courses Afte Regular Meeting and statistics.h
Audubon Society. for a semester's work. Only a few Tomorrow Night. Rev. BraggWill Talk
more than a dozen courses were of Aet rurhanelf e r unday
TAKEN AT ISLE ROYALE fered and the matter of choice was Aetn, whe wlaurlac igat 8ees oftesneirll
x Ingly b uvsimple. Today, how-T elkwstUnlfeanr"our,
Walter E. Hastings custodin of raat once easier and more o'clock in the Women's League be discussed by Rev. Raymond B.
birds' eggs and honorary men1ber difficult. The University now offers building, members of the Studio Bragg Sunday morning at the Uni-
of the University of Museums staff, about 2,000 courses in 12 major club will put aside matters of so- tarian church, He will remain for
Hating rEtrn fmBsoNewPctuoro fields and the students faced with Eetbusiness to indulge in an eve- the Sunday evening service of the
wfil retiur fston toernorrof the ttproble oo f "W h wil Itake?" ning of social activity, it was an- be l satsent noclockhin the
Massachusetts Audubon society there to take?"rnun.Ol fsT ryy. -Reh BraryW llllk
where he appeared on a special This growthinathe branches of tnfnte,'hA cmirea of the soent- Aeicaa Youthve ment,?"a
higher learning hias kept pace with onfent chairma of the entr a u o the sect,?"H
moion icsur progam. Hstindgs the steady growth of the Unhver- There will be bride for those ReverendBragg is now secretary
WhoterE. reid sinSthuLyosandofsity as one of An erica's greatest who care to play and music and of the Wesern Unitarian confer-
unofficially connected with the TState colleges. According to fig- refreshments. ence with headquarters in Chicago,
Museum here, is a member of the ures released by Wilfred B. Shawi The sketch class of the Studio and was formerly minister of the
state Board of Conservation at Director of Alumni relations, seven club will hold its rdegular meeting at Unitarian church in Evanston, Ill.
Lasiretnstudents entered the University in|8:30 o'clock tonght, in the fourth He is a graduate of the University
Lheso. p e wthe fall of 1841, to face a faculty floor studio of the architectural of Chicago and Meadville Theolog-
motion program.wHiniwrre composed of exactly two members. uilding. !eical Seminary.

to Carry on Sales Campaigns
for Retail Stores.
Increasing the sales of local mier-
chants will be the purpose of the
Campus Advertising Agency, whose
Michigan branch was established
this week in the Michigan Theatre
Building.
The local organization is associ-
ated with more than 20 similar
'agencies in the more important
college towns of the country. Aid-
ed by the accumulated experience
of years of work in this field, the
Michigan branch considers itself
well qualified to supervise the
sales campaigns of Ann Arbor re-
tailers.
The agency will not accept ad-
vertising from any firm until it
has conducted a thorough investi-
gation of the merchant's individ-
ual problems. After an analysis
has been made, the type of adver-
tising which will have the greatest
appealĀ° will be outlined.
I The agency is said to offer re-
markable opportunities for stu-
dents interested in publicity, coim-
mercialnart,and advertising.

AssociWed Press Photo 1
Dr. Daniel A. Poling,
Prominent New Yorker, who Was
among the witnesses defending the
Eighteenth Amendment before the
recent hearing of the house judi-

ciary

committee in Washington.

W E wish to thank our many friends
for the kind reception accorded
us in our new specialty food shop.
Get in your suggestion for a name for
our new store.
$25.00 PRIZE to the Winner
The place where you can get REAL:
Spanish Tamales
Chicken Tamales
Spaghetti with 'Chili
Strawberry Nut Waffles
Clayton's Super Hamburger

WE NEVER CLOSE
.C CLAYTON
6111 East William

shown at the Massachusetts meet-!
ing included most of the new filmsj
recently taken by the Micbhgan
man concerning bird life and bird
habits. This is the second time
that the eastern organization has
called upon Hastings for his pic-
tures which are considered among1
the best of their kind in the coun-
try.
A majority of the filmy included{
in the exhibit were taken this sum-i
mer at Isle Royale, Lake Superior,
where the University Museum's
staff spent several months in re-
search along every branch of sci-
entific inquiry.

e

Last fall, just 88 years later, the
last student's registration brought
the total to 11,555, which is an in-
crease of'over 1650 times its orig-
inal number. By including the Ex-
tension division and the Summer
session the enrollment would be
nearly 14,000.
Up and down climbs, rather than
diagonal walks, were the fashion
in the early days. The stairways
in the one building on campus,*!
Mason hall, led to classrooms, ex-
ecutive offices, living quarters for
students, library and chapel. At-
tendance at latter services was
compulsory.

..in the market it's

VISION,/

s
soft
VRI.PrEN

!

News From Other
Colleges
LIBRARY PROBLEM ACUTE
UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON
-An attempt is being m de here
to bring about a crisis in the mulch
discussed , library question. The
Strouble started several weeks ago
when the main library was ordered
closed on Sunday by the Dean.
Hopes are running high here this
morning following a decision by an
underclassman's activity group to
circulate petitions anong the stu-
dent body asking that the library
be opened on Sunday afternoons.
STUDENTS HAVE SPECIAL SHOW
dORNELL UNIVERSITY- Good
behavior is demanded by one of the
* theatres near the Cornell campus
for all performances other than the
second shown on Saturday night
when all in attendance may mis- 4
behave arld "act collegiate."
ORIENTAL CLUB FORMED
PRINCETON UNIVERSITY - An
Oriental Club has been organized
here by members of the faculty and
student body who are interested in
phases of the oriental field.
STUDENTS INSPECT PAPERS
OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY-

DRUGt
207' South Main

STORES

723 N. University

217 North Main

ThursdayFriday and

1.25 Moone 's Emerald Oil ........
.50 Bru-Aspirin Comp, for Colds-
.25 Palmolive Rambler Rose Talcum
.50 Dew Crystal Pure Deodorant . .
1.20 Father John's Medicine'.....'
1.00 Frostilla ... x .. . }e e. . .4... .
.65 Glycothymoline a . ..... .

.98
A39
.17
.39
.98
.89
.43

*'' ! 3

i n a ciga rette *Its

STE

MAN MAY SAY TOO MUCH, even on
the best of subjects." We pride ourselves on
Chesterfield's quality, and its blend and cross-
blend, the standard Chesterfield method.
But what counts is not what we say, but what
you taste! And on that subject, Chesterfields
speak for themselves
TASTE 'above eryt/?/2MILD

and yctl
SATISFY

I

I

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