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March 11, 1930 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-03-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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TUESDAY, MARCH 11, 1930

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ENGINEER WORKING WITH MODEL PLANES FINDS
LIGHTNING BOLTS MAY STRIKE PLANE IN FLIGHT

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By R. P. CRONIN, JR.
(Associated Press taff Writer)
AKRON, O., ich. 10-Man-made
lightning has convinced one engin-
eer that an airplane may be struck
in flight but that lightning hazard
may be eliminated oy insulation.
Arthur O: Austin, of Barberton.
0., says his experiments show light-
ning will strike protruding parts of
a plane. These, he says, may be
protected.
The radio aerial and air speed in-
dicator tube were shown to be the
most likely parts to be struck. Un-
der certain conditions lightning
striking a speeding plane might
cripple the ignition system or burn
out a bearing, Austin found. z
In his outdoor laboratory Austin
explodes synthetic bolts on model
planes, wing sections, fuel tanks,
motors, ignition systems, and one
full-sized plane.
Lightning shot at a wooden pro-
peller, in motion, followed to the
base of a metal sheath and jumped
across to the top cylinder ,The
motor, however, continued to func-
tion.I
Bolts of 3,000,000 volts are shot
in the laboratory, and Austin plans
to double the voltage. The labora-
tory, a maze of electrical machin-
ery, includes three of the largest
transformers in the world, each
rated at 900,000 volts.
The transformers feed into each
other to create the high voltage
used. Overhead are transmission
towers, insulator strings, oscillators,
and' a large cage aerial in which
the electrical charge is stored.
Austin became interested, in the
research after the crash last fall
of a Transcontinental Air Trans-
port plane. Aviators and scientists
lightning is nu hazard to planes in

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NY 14, 15,16,.17,'30 '
hILL AUDITORIUM, ANN ARBOR
CONDUCTORS
OORE Musical Director
i STOCK Orchestra Cond.
MARTER Assistant Cond.
EE Children's Cond.
WOLD FOWE SOO S

EARL V. MI
FREDERICI
ERIC DELA!
JVA HIGB

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Arthur 0. Austin (lower right), Ohio engineer, experiments in out-
door laboratory (upper left) to learn the dangers of lightning to air-
planes. How synthetic lightning strikes a model plane is shown
(center).

9 rI1 11bAr11 I piYlli111r1 rMalY 1®11 W Iw iNli!

flight and that metal planes, even
if struck, would carry away the
charge without damage.

EUHREFLECTIONS,
WELL KNOWN C- ><>o<S>oc=o
What's Where.
Rihani Makes Talk Before Group! Closing today are "Dynamite" at
ofStudents at Sunday the Majestic and "Fast Life" at the
of Wuerth, both reviewed below.
Night Banquet. i George Arliss' "Disraeli" opens to-
j morrow at the' Michigan, as does
RUTHVENGIVES ADDRESS "Hearts In Exile" at the Majestic,
to be reviewed in Thursday's Daily.
Nationalism with an intellectual 'Navy Blues" is at the Wuerth.
ne~llanDraa

The engineer plans a public dem-
onstration 8f his experiments in
the summer.y
ENG'INEER TO TA9LK'
ON SALVAGE wQR,
John C. Niedermair to Deliver
JnIllustrated Lecture ei
on Submarines.
RAISED FAMOUS WRECKS
John C. Niedermair, who was in

renaissance as its dominant note Enough matrial f six melo
wa the theme struck Sunday night dramas has been inserted by De-
at a banquet of the newly-founded Mille in- "Dynamite," a rapid-fire
Arab Students' union. The meet- succession of tense . situations.C
ing was gives in honor of Ameen There's amurderer sentenced with
Rihani, prominent Arab writer and amy sister haningonihusad
a society girl buying a husband
statesman. from his wife, a prison marriage,
The keynote of the meeting was oa wildhrevel of ther 400," a little
struck by John Khalaf, '31, presi- '.yid run over with the subsequent
dent of the Arab Students' union ife and death race for the special-
Peaceful nationaliity by means of ist, and finally a mine disaster,
y y A~nd, believe it or not, all convinc-
education was his principle theme ngly depicted by this domestic
Ameen Rihani who gave the mai: negaphone wielder, who has easi-
speech of the evening stressed ly adapted his technique to suit the
nore particularly the need for bet- ali picure
ter relationships withth Arb Unusually fine acting is done by1
the Arabs ooth Conrad Nagel, and Charles
"Understanding," he said, "is the Bickford, the latter soon to be seen
cornerstone of sympathy." n Garbo's "Anne Christie." Kay
President Alexander G. Ruthven Johnson has the female lead, and
and Prof. William H. Worrell, o) while not especially devastating to
the semitics department, spoke laze at, is a competent actress.
for the faculty of the University. Scarcely a word was heard from!
Each stressed the English debt to I packed second-show audiencel
the Arabs and to Arabic culture. Sunday night, proof enough of itsl
Among the other distinguished gripping tenseness. As is the habit
guests was El Humani, Arabic poet :f more than one instructor, Screen
and member of the privy council of Reflector grades "Dynamite" twice:
Prince Abdullah of Transjordania, A~- while witnessing it, B on?
who recited impromptu some po- thinking it over.
etry in his native tongue. This Younger Generation.
Unity of the Arabic speaking Despite a good cast, "Fast Life" F
peoples and ultimate independence tails to live up to expectations. Thel
as a nation is the aim of this junior Fairbanks, Chester Morris,
movement of which the Michigan and Loretta Young are featured in
organization is the first unit in this story of a fast young set.
America. At the present time there This film had a long run on
are 20 students of Arabic descent Broadway and does have its inter-
in the University. esting moments, but only rates a C
on the whole. The best spot on the?
THOMAS W. LALLY current . Michigan program is a;
hilarious Laurel and Hardy comedy
DIES IN DETROIT 1-two would-be drunks in a night)
.club.
Thomas W. Lally, 72, retired i- -B. J. A.
spector of the Detroit police de- ._
partment, and the father of MissNe Death C a br
Adele Lally, of Ann Arbor, who was New Chamber'
fatally injured in an automobile
accident near Ypsilanti. Feb. 18. for CaninesProves
died Sunday evening at his home Proves
in Detroit. Inventor s Downfall
Mr. Lally was born Oct. 8, 1857, 1___
in Detroit, and joined the police (By Associated Press)
department in 1881. He resigned HAMMOND, Ind.,March 10- The
in 1887 to enter the United States vogue for bigger, better and more
customs service but returned to thej csientific dog catching has reach-
department in 1890. ed Hammond.
He is survived by the Widow. Skinno Summers, conductor of~
Adele; two sons, Thomas B. Lally the local dog pound, decidedthat
and Lucius Lally, both of Detroit;I Hammond should be second to
two daughters, Mrs. Felice Christie none. So Summers constructed a
of Yonkers, N. Y., and Miss Gret- new and improved "death chain-
chen Lally of Ann Arbor. ber"
The new chamber completed.
Chinese Brigands Kill Summers picked out a group of
Three Finnish Women doomedldogs, put themin the little
Thre Finis Wo en1room, turned on the gas and, wait-j
ed.
(By Associated Pres) Several hours later a policeman
SHANGHAI, March 10.-Three noticed a nair of familiar feet pro-!

charge of the technical work in

I

connection with the raising of the
submarine S-51 and the S-4, will
give an illustrated ,lecture on "TheE
Salvage of Submarines in the Open

Sea," at 8 o'clock Friday, March 14,
in theNatural Scienceauditorium.
Niedermair is a senior engineer
in the Design division of the Eu-
reau of Construction and Repair,
of the Navy department. He was a
member of the technical staff of
both the Special committee on
Stability and Loading, and the
American Delegation to the Con-
Terence for the Safety of Fife at
Sea.
When the Submarine S-51 was
rammed and sunk offmBlock Island
in 1925 by the steamer "City of
Rome," Niedermair was called in to
take charge of the technical sip f
raising the sunken vessel. .[_6ai, }
in 1927, when another tragedy of
the sea was enacted in the sinking'
of the submarine S-4, it was Nie-
dermair who was appointed to
oversee the salvaging.
Niedermair is a graduate of
Webb Institute, a school in Ford-
ham, New York, which was found-
ed by an old ship-builder, and in
which instruction only in ship-
building is given.
News From Other
Colleges
Finds Prehistoric Fish.
UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS-Sam i
Quay, of the geology department
here has found a fish near Dallas?
which authorities say is no less
than 37,500,000 years old. The
specimen, which is broken in only
one place, will be put on display
soon.
Panhellenic Formal Planned.
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA
-The Panhellenic Society of the
University, has decided to hold its
annual spring formal sometime inn
May and also to hold a wom-l
an's sing sometimes. this month.
Committes were appointed for I
both of these affairs and will an-
nounce their complete plans in a)
short time. I
Fraternities Arrange Luncheons.
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA {
-Inter-fraternity lunches will i
again be held this year as a result
of a decision made at a recent {

CLAIRE flUX
European Opera Companies
DUSOLINA GIANNINI
European Opera Companies
NANETTE GUILFORD
Metropolitan Opera Company
ETHYL HAYDEN
Distinguished American Artist
MERLE CC
Metropolitan Opera Company
''THRYN MEISL 3
Chicago Opera Company
PAUL ALTHOUSE
Metropolitan Opera Company
DAN GRIDLEY
Eminent American Singer
RICHARD BONELLI
Chicago Opera Company
CHASE BAROMEO
Chicago Opera Company
PAUL LEYS SAC
New York Civic Repertory Theatre
N RUGGIERO RICCI
Nine Year Old Wunderkind

SOPRANO

SOPRANO

SOPRANO

CONTRALTO

CONTRALTO

SOPRANO

TENOR

TENOR

BARITONE

,

BASS

NARRATOR

VIOLINIST

PERCY GRAINGER
Renowned virtuoso
GUY MAIER
One of the inseparable two
LEE PATTISON
The other of the two

PIANIST

PIANIST

PIANIST

Lil

ORGANIZATIONS

THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
CHILDREN'S FESTIVAL CHORUS

300 Voices
70 Players
400 Voices

CHORAL WORKS

meeting of the Inter-fraternity
council. The exchange luncheons
were started last year because

KING DAVID
MAGNIFICAT
orFni IiIM

HONEGGAR
BACH

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