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March 08, 1930 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-03-08

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FOUR

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

SATURD~AY. MATRCT S.1930

IAIL

/fl .} LV L11 liV AA V 1OkJV

Published every morning except Monday
during the Tlniversity Year by theBoard i
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
kessciation
The Associated -Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
in this paper and the local news published
herein
A Entered 'at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
tchigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.06; by mail,
r rices:tAnn Arbor Press Building, May-
bard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF,
I. Telephone 4925
1F MANAGING EDITOR
ELLIS B. MERRY
Editorial Chairman.........George C. Tilley
City Editor...............Pierce Rosenberg
.ews Editor. -...........Donald . Kline
Sports Editor.....Edward L. Warner, Jr.
Women's Editor..........Marjorie Follmer
Telegraph Editor...... . . Cassam A. Wilson
Mlusic and Drama.......William J Gorman
Litrary l tyditor....,....LawrenceR, tKlein
-A,4ssta,,.City Editor . _Robert J. Feldan
Night Editors--Editorial Board Memhera
Prank F. Cooper Henry J. Merry
William C.CGentry Robert L. Sos
Charles R. K.'ri Walter W Wd
Gurney .Cilham
Reporters
Iertram Askwith Lester May
"Helen Barc Margaret Mix
Maxwell Bauer David M. Nichol
Mary L. Behymer William Page '
Allan H. Berkman Howard H. Peckhar
Arthur J. Bernstein Hugh rPierce
Beac Coger Victor Rabinowit~
.hBeach Coger Jo n D. Reindel
JhomasM: Cooley Jeanie .Roberts
Helen Domine oe A.1Rsseti
Margaret Fekels Joseph iuwitch
Cathrine Ferrin Ralph R. Sachs
Car R. lorsydie ' Cecelia Shriver
Sheldon C. Fullerton Charles R. Sprowl
Ruth Gallmeyer Adsit Stewart
RutGeddesS. Cadwell Swanso
Ginevra Ginn Jane Thayer
ack Goldsmitk Margaret Thompso
mily sGimes Richard L. Tobin
Morris Grover man- Robert Townsend
Margaret Harris Elizabeth Valentine
1. Cullen Kennedy arold . Warren, Jr
ean Levy C. Lionel Willens
tussyE McCracken Barbara Wright
Dorothy Magee Vivian Ziini
Bruce J. Manley
BUSINESS STAFF1
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
A. J. JORDAN, JR.
Assistant Manager
ALEX K. SCHERER
Department Managers
Advertising...........T. Hollister Mabley
Advertising...........Kasper 11. Halveson
Advertising...........herwood A. Upton
Svice.................(eorge A. S ater
Circulation ............. .. Vernor .Davis
Accounts....................John R. Rose
Publications..........Gerge R. Hamilton
Business Secretary-Mary Chase
Assistants
Byrne M Badenoch Marvin Kobacker
James E. Cartwright Lawrence Luey
RaBert Crawford Thomas tMuir
rry- B. Culver George R Patterso
Thomas M Davis Charles Sanford
Norman Eliezer Lee Slayton
aes Hoffer joseph Van Riper
orris Johnson Rober tWilliamson
Charles Kline Wiiiam It. Worby
Dorothy Blo mgardner Alice MClly
Lara Codling Sylvia iller
Anes Davis Helen E. Mussewhite
BerniceGlaser Eleanor Walkinshaw
Hortense Gooding Dorothea Waterman
SATURDAY, MARCH 8, 1930
NIGHT EDITOR--HENRY MERRY
EDITOR'S RIGHTS.
When the Ohio Appellate court
reversed a contempt of court con-.
viction of two Cleveland editors, it
upheld an historic right of the
American people-freedom of the
press. This phrase is by no means
a trite one, but retains all of its
original vitality and deep signifi-
cance for which the American peo-
plye fought.
The opinion of the court is of
particular moment in view. of the
recent attempts at suppression of
facts in metropolitan newspapers
and at universities throughout the
country:

"We live in an age of pitiless
publicity where the freedom
of the press and freedom of
speech are paramount issues,
and newspapers should have
the right to print what they
please, always guiding them-
selves by the laws of libel. A
free people must have a, free
press and a newspaper should
have the right to speak freely
its views."

AN IDEAL OF SERVICE.
The Utopian University which' ' $ OLL
consisted of a scholar sitting at
one end of a log and a student at
the other had for its aim a maxi- EXTRA!
mum of service to the individual EDITOR
student, an aim which has ever IN RIOT
l been held as the ideal of all mod-
ern universities. One of the most I went to Detroit Thursday to see
Spractical ways in which this Uni- what the Reds were going to do and,
versity serves students has been I almost landed in the hospital.
through; the liberal grant of loans to The report that 100,000 people
undergraduates whose intellectual were involved was a bit exaggerat-
ability and worth of purpose merit (unless you count in all the rela-~
assistance in their attempt to be-- tives, friends and business acquain-
come educated. tances of those who actually had
The extent of this service is in- anything to do with the demon-
dicated by the fact that since Jan, stration) but there were enough to
1 about 21,500 has been loaned to cause plenty of confusion.
some 175 applicants. The figure * * *
would be still larger, it is reported There were enough cops in evi-
by the committee in charge of stu- dence to stop ANY riot, so it isn't
dent loans, if more funds were strange that the alleged uprising
available. No loans are granted was merely the efforts of a lot of
until a detailed personal interview excited people to get out of the way
convinces the committee that the of riot sticks.
student applicant is in real need of
money and is eminently deserving* *
of aid, but despite the care exer- I was doing my best to get out of
cised in lending money, it is often Hudson's about 2 o'clock when sud-
hard to adequately accommodate denly there arose a roar of shout-
all worthy candidates. ing, running people and five
Particularly is this the case with mounted cops galloped into a mass
senior students in the law and of shoppers on the sidewalks of
medical schools, who often after the Woodward Avenue. I tried to get
long seven year stretch of school back through the'door to get out
work are hard pressed for funds to of the way, but 14 women pushed
complete their college education. in ahead of me and I had to knock
In contrast with the great number several of them down to get out of
of law and medical students who the way.
are highly deserving of assistance,
a smaller amount of loan funds Altogether it was the most ridi-.
have been established for their use culous riot I ever saw.
than are available for literary and
engineering students. POME
The difficulty which the loan By Piccolo Pete.
committee meets in effecting an The noon-tide hordes were mil-
equitable distribution of funds to ling fast
deserving students is illustrative of When up the campus walk there
a serious hindrance which per- passed
plexes a large number of the Uni- A youth who bore these words
versity's administratieve boards. In aot
frequently repeated cases, those Upon a banner soft:
who are in charge of expending theKUPOFFaTHErSAL!
University's money find that they And thouhtless footsteps falling
are handicapped in making a judi-' Ath
cial budget of available funds byWhen thru the Library door
the circumstance that a large num- there passed
ber of endowments have been A youth who bore (and oh, so
granted for narrowly limited pur- nice)
poses. A banner with this strange de-
When philanthropic alumni of
nineteenth century classes estab- KE OFF THE SEAL!
lished trust funds for the benefit of An aged B. & G. plied his mop
their alma mater, they too fre- Whe quoth theyohi ade
quently stipulated that all income When quoth the youth, I bade
derived from the funds be used for Atheekopd
a single specific purpose. The re n breath
sult is that now, long after the His holy, splendid shibboleth:
death of the benefactors, the Uni-
versity finds itself in possession of Irreverent mops are sloshing
money which could best be expend-
ed for other purposes than that for ooze
which it must be used. Changing shoes.
conditions of University life have Within a scrub
effected changes in expenditures wit pail, drab and
which the benefactors were unable A flag-its message flaunting
to foresee. yet:
In an effort toward fuller real-~ KEEP OFF THE SEAL !
iation of the University's ideal of , T SA
intellectual social service, the Re-k
gents some time ago issued a re-' Gosh, do you mean me?
quest that all endowment grantsi ATENTION, HELL WEEKERS
contain an elastic clause whereby Dear Joe: Why be so hard on the
the Regents would be able to ale isoylcuewt erhl
the exact application of any gifti istory lecture with a weary, hell
with the idea of permitting theweek freshman dozing on her
most useful continuance of the shoulder, and they both looked
benefaction in accordance with the j happy!
general wishes of the donor. Bonjour.
The present. experience of the
student loan committee .points 'to The Ottawa Ice Man writes from
the great. need'of. alumni compli- Chicago to say that The Daily is'
ance with the Regents' request.. A his one ray of sunshine in that
university unable to budget avail-. wicked city. I have placed his let-
able funds would, be handicapped ter in our Unsolicited Testimonials
ablefund woud. e hadicapedfile, and everybody in the office
almost as severely as. a university.n
without sufficient money. feels just dandy about it. Only
o ! one sentence in his letter calls for

criticism. He wants beer in the
Health Service, Tsch, tsch! Why
Campus Opi on not ale, too?)
Contributors are askedI to be brief,
confning t hemseves toes s than 300 WARNING: SCOTCH JOKE
words of possible. Anoniymous coin-
munications will be disregarded. The AHEAD!
names of communicants will, however, Listen, Joe: I've decided that I
be regarded as confidential, upon re-
quest. Letters published should not be shouldn't allow you to get along
construed as expressing the editorial
opinion of The D~aily. without me any longer, so here
goes: The Scotch student who
BUILDINGS AS MEMORIALS. lives next door called up the Yel-
It is a practice in most, universi- low Cab company yesterday and
ties and colleges in this country to asked them to call for an extra
name their various classroom and passenger at his address.
other campus buildings after men I Reym.
who have added to the glory of * *
their alma maters through scholar- SHHHHHH-NOT SO LOUD!
ly or administrative achievement.
It is very stange that an institu- Dear Joe: You have a big nerve
tion so old and full of tradition as accusing me of having a dual per-
Michigan, so-called "mother of sonality and I should like to ask
state universities," has not cnga you a personal question. How come
ed in such a practice to agveatcr your telephone number is the same
extent than it has. of that of the Helen Newberry resi-
The reason for this is shrouded dence? And why is your address
in mystery. Michigan's unwilling- different?
ness to recognize the deeds of her Seth Johns.

sI

i

Music And Drama

I
ij

TONIGHT: In the Mendelssohn
Theatre the Hillel players present
the last performance of "Capon-
sacchi" by Arthur Goodrich and
Rose Palmer.
CAPONSACCHII
A Review by William J. Gorman.
Praise with faint (tending to be-
come loud) damns seems to be the
only reviewing solution here. The
will towards some beauty of con-
ception and elevation of pitch is
welcome and deserves praise. The
Hillel Players chose a poetic drama
(which had the same will towards
beauty) for their dramatic debut.
They seemingly went to the utmost
expense to give the play its proper
dress in the way of both sets and
costumes for in these aspects the
production is the best on campus
this year. But unfortunately the
production (also the play) fails
quite miserably.
The main faults lie in poor di-
rection. Small bits, unimportant in
themselves, are allowed to go un-.
perfected with the resulting ruin
of whole scenes. Norman Fleisch-
man as a drunken pseudo-wit cart-.
wheels around the stage in Leon
Errol circular leg evolutions; unin-
tentionally of course, it is a musi-
cal comedy diunk introducing a
farcical note quite inharmonious in
poetic drama. Similarly, Melvin
Benstock, as Canon Conti, in Act
I, scene II sticks his head out of
the curtain where he is hiding
when he hears his name mentioned
unfavorably and makes a clownish
face, eliciting quite inappropriate
and not too sympathetic roars.
Then, the' most noticeable flaw of
all, preventing quietly excited per-
ception of a scene otherwise quite
well done, is the utter inability or
ridiculous burlesque (one didn't
know quite which) of Lucille Gross-
man as Marinetta the inkeeper's
wife. In this same scene when
Pompilla faints, there is an imma-
ture, awkward stage picture of
Caponsachhi holding her, yet con-
tent to let her partially uncom-
fortably droop. These are all
minor perfections and their enut-
meratibn seems like quibbling; but
they absolutely prevent convincing
projection of the play's interest, a
bit shaky in the writing anyway.
More generally, the usual ama-
teur difficulty with blank verse, the
unnecessary preoccupation and
hesitation over phrasing in the line,
tended to slow the production's
tempo. The carnival scene with its
almost countless entrances and ex-.
its should have been played as rap-
idly as possible for disguise but
wasn't
The principals were quite capable.
Harold Sedar in the difficult title
role, stylistically twisted with a lot
of Browning's spiritual-analytical
pother, had a sincere and careful
approach. And on the whole
(though he tended to have a jerky
style, doing everything in so many
steps and gestures) he was success-
fill; giving the" play with admi--
able support from Berenice Solo-
mon several good Dantesque love
moments. Maurice Lazar was
properly loud and strutting as
Guido the villain in the operatic
style. Incidentally, Rosalie Gold-
stick in a minor part as Pompilia's
mother in the last scene was quite
impressive.
Nothing last night was really
perfect except those intangible
things that floated around the the-

atre-aspirations. These were very
clearly good and certainly deserve
encouragement with the one sug-
gestion about the need of good di-
rection.
NAUGHTY MARIETTA.

- 1 t lilf gglll11f1 f111U ti 11111111f111f111l 1t lllfllfli fl llftffflfflllf'
EUROPE $365
SIX COUNTRIES-
PASSION PLAY LENT
One of 250 College Travel Tours -
Nearly 4,000 members in 1929 Saturday, March 8th
tst Class Hotels
More Motor Travel. Get the Book 12:05 (noon) Brief Devotional Service in Hat' s H
from.Chapel.
E. G. KUEBLER
601 East Huron Street 7:15 P. M. to 8:45 P. M. Service of Preparation with .
Ann Arbor, Mich. Phone 6412 -address by Rev. Frederic Lauderburn in Harris
Hall Chapel.
Ii- First Sunday in Lent, March 9th
S9:30A. M. Holy Communion (in Harris Hall).
11:00 A. M. Morning Prayer. Preacher: Rev. Frederic
Lauderburn. .
6:30 P. M. Student Supper in Harris Hall. Speaker:
Rev. Frederic Lauderburn.
O ur Tradem ark is ^ l "fll11!1!1flllllllll1111filn "l l111ullllllll!l11""
your assurance of
badge perfection
Fraternity and ~Hark To His Master's Voice! Saying
Sorority BadgesG T UNIVERS1TY MUSIC HOUSE
For Everything Musical
Burr Patterson and
Auld Co.Radios:-,
Auld Co. Majesticitor,Crosley
Jewelers and Lowest Prices: -
k Fa rn y t I TERMS Pianos:- "" 0? -
Statrt rs an ToRS Baldwin, Kohler & Campbell
Stationers To Suit. NWIHn7")"
603 Street Play While Orchestral Instruments
Church You Pay. Victor, Columbia, Brunswick
I ('~ ~Records
ASK THOMAS HINSHAW, Mgr.
Want Ads Pay 601 East William Street Phone 7.515
N___AAc
GA

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FIRST METHODIST
CHURCH
E Cor. S. State and E. Washington Sts.
Min., Rev. Arthur W. Stalker, D. D.
Associate Minister, Rev. SamuelJ.
Harrison Student Director, Mr.
Ralph Johnson. Mrs. Allura Win-
ters, Advisor of Women Students.
10:30 A. M.-Morning Worship.
"HUMANISM," Dr. Arthur W.
Stalker.
12 00 M.-Four Discussion Groups
for Students at Wesley Hall.
6:00 P. M.-"Bell Music in Eng-
land and the Low Countries of
Europe," Prof. Earl V. Moore.
8:00 P. M.-Wesleyan Guild Lec-
ture at University Convocation.
Subject: "DOES A M E R I C A
WANT . FREEDOM .OF
SPEECH?"
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
On East Huron, west of State
Rev. R. Edward Sayles, Minister
Howard R. Chapman, Minister for
Students.
9:45 A. M.-Church School. Wal.
lace Watt, Superintendent.
9:45 A. M.-University students
class at Guild House. S. J. Cheney,
'30, leads ea discussion on "Our
Cities."
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon by Mr. Sayles,
"SOME PATHS TO GOD"
(3rd in special series)
5:30 P. M.-Friendship Hour for
young young people at Guild
house.
6:30 'P. M.-Devotional service
with discussion.
BETHLEHEM
EVANGELICAL CHURCH
(Evangelical Synod of N. A.)
Fourth Ave. between Packard and
William
Rev. Theodore R. Schmale
9:00 A. M.-Bible School.
10:00 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon topic: "Companionship in
Sorrow."
11:00 A. M.-German Service.

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1iuron and Division Sts.
Merle H. Anderson, Minister
Mrs. Nellie B. Cadwell, Counsellor
for University Women.
10:45 A. M.--Morning Worship.
Sermon: "Spiritual Gout."
12:00 Noon-Student Class, Prof. H.
Y. McClusky.
5:30 P. M.-+-Social Hour for Young
People.
6:30 P. M.-Young People's Meet-
ing. Speaker: Prof. George E.
Carrothers.
TUNE IN!
Sunday Morning Service
of the
DETROIT UNITY CENTER
br, ideast from
The Detroit Civic Thea e
11:30 A.M. Eastern Stand. Time
10%30 A.M. Central Stand. Tium
W I R
Detroit
EVERY ThURSDAY EV'G
(Beginning Jan. 9, 1930)
LEC TRE ON PRINCIPLES
OF SUCESSFUL LIVING 1
Seting forth the Principles by which
to fty haunfold within his lie the
Health. Peace and Prosperity which
God has provided.
11:%05 P.M. Eastern Stand. Timm
10*O5P.M. CentralStand. Time

HILLEL FOUNDATION
615 E. University Dial 3779
7:30 P. M.-Sunday services at the
chapel of the Michigan League.
Rabbi A. H. Fink will speak.
Short open forum discussion.
8:30 'P. M.-Open House at the
Foundation.

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
State and William
Allison Ray Heaps, Minister
Sunday, March 9th, 1930
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
S e r m o n topi"': "Movies and
Morals."
5:30 to 6:00 P. M.-Student Fel-
lowship Social 1-lour.
6:00 to 6:30 P. M.-Fellowship
Supper.
6:30 P. M.-Illustrated Lecture by
Dr. Walter Mosauer, "ON 'THE
SAHARA."

J

Freedom of the press is abso-
lutely essential to a nation such as
the United States, for democratic
self-government is an illusory term,
at best, an ideal as yet far from,
attainment and possibly unattain-'
able where such a large population
is concerned. The palpitating,
sycophant press, afraid to express
its real views, is failing the com-
munity which it should serve, and
usually abets corroption in the gov-
ernment.
\The situation here at Michigan
is unusually salutary, for suppres-
sion is practically non-existent.
This is most unusual in cases in
which an organ for the expression
of opinion is so slosely connected
with an organization that has con-
trol over it, such as the University

i
3

Continuing the Victor Herbertl
Festival, which is being transcon- I
tinentally planted from New York#
and which has begun in Detroit
with Fritzi Scheff in Mlle. Modis-
te, Ilse Marvenga will come to the
Cass next week in "Naughty Mari-
etta." The exquisite artistry of the
dimunitive arva as a prima donna,
as well as her exceptionally bril-
liant histrionic endowment, are
well employed in the vivacious role.
Miss Marvenga has never given a
finer expression of her fineness as
a vocalist and actress than in this
most sprightly of Victor Herbert's
creations where she is called upon
to run the gamut of light opera
calisthentics.
The inexhaustible storehouse of
melody of the illustrious musician

BE CONSISTENT
IN YOUR RELIGION
ATTEND C-lURCH
REGULARLY

7:00 P.
League.

.M. - Young

People'sI

ST. ANDREW'S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division and Catherine Sts.
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector
Rev. T. L. Harris, Assistant
8:00 A. M.-Holy Communion.
9:30 A. M.--Holy Communion.
9:30 A. M.--Church School.
(Kindergarten m e e t s at 11
o'clock. Adult Class at 10.)
11:00 A. M.-Morning Prayer; ser-
mon by Rev. Frederic Lauder-
burn.
6:30 P. M'.---Student supper in
Harris Hail; addres by Mr.
Lauderburn.
7:45 P. M.--Evening Prayer; ad.
dress by Mr. Lewis, "Miracle of the
Curing of the Blind Man.
.t

sons or fathers cannot be for lack 1
of worthy men. A list of those who Well, Seth, you see I don't want
have held administrative positions the gels to read my mail.
in the University, or who have been * * *
professors or have graduated there- The three editors of the Indianaj
from, reads almost like a perpetual Daily Student humor column have
Who's Who. That.more buildings' sent me *i swell letter asking me to

r
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'3
I

L -'
ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
Washington St. at Fifth Ave.
E. C. Stellihorn, Pastor
10:30 A. M.--Dedication of para-

i,

FIRST CHURCH
CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 S. Division St.
t. 2~n A Rat II IA- .3A_.._.. c _..

ST. PAUL'S LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(Missouri Synod)
Third and West Liberty Sts.
C. A. Brauer, Pastor
F.AAI-L . .-

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