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February 01, 1930 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1930-02-01

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PAGE FOUR'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1930

TI-IFi MIChIGAN DAILY

Published every morning except Monday
du-;ng th., niversityyear by the Bnard in
ton i l' tudent Publication,
Mer o> Western Conference Fdtorial
Association,.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the uise for republication' of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
in this paper and, the local news published
herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.0o; by mail,
flces: :Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
mard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
ELLIS B. MERRY
Editorial Chairman.........George C. TilleyI
City Editor...............Pierce Rosenberg 4
News Editor.'........Donald 3. Kline
Sports Edir......Edward L. Warner, Jr.
Women's Editor..........Marjorie Follmer
Telegraph Editor,........Cassam A. Wilson
Music and Drama.........William J. Gorman
Literary Editor.........Lawrence R. Klein
Assistant City Editor. . .. Robert J. Feldrran
Night Editors-Editorial Board Members
Fran4 E, Coopcr Henry J. Merry
Willin C. Gentry Robert I:. Sloss
Charles R. hauffuan Walter W. Wilds
Gurney Williams
Reporters

ter stating there was drinking at
the aristocratic and artistic Cen-
tury Club of New York. So Mr.
Brookhart kicks up his heels ini Il sic aii
true Ioman ckass style and tell c
the Senate and the rest of the na-

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VPEWRITERS
RIBBONS
SU.PP+IES,
rall makes of
typewriters.
pid turnover, fresh stock, insures
st quality at a moderate price.
0. D. MORRILL
South State St. Phone 6615

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Bertrain Askwith Les.ter May ,
Helen Pare David M. Nichol
Maxwell BaUrr WilliamPage
Mary L.. e-hymer 11owardi 1I. Peckhan,
Benjamin If. -Berentsonllugh Pierce
.Allan H. I'smain Victor Rabinowitz
Arthur J. Ucrnstein john D. Reindel
S. Beach Cunger Te:'llik Roberts
Thomas M. coley Toseph A. Russell
:ohn H. Denler 1J6eh ]kRuwith
el(:n omine William P. Salzarulo
Margaret Eckels Charles R. Spro*l
Kathearine Fierrin t dsit Stewart
Sheldon C. Fullerton S. Cadwell Swanson
Ruth Geddes Jane Thayer
Ci'ievra Gin ]\I:vgaret Thompson
orack Goldsmith Richard L. Tobin
Morris Croverinan Elizabeth Valentine

Ross Gustn Harold 0. Warren, Jr.
MArgaret Hfarris Charles White
David B. Hempstead G. Lionl Willens
S.Cullen Kennedy John TL Willoughby
can Levy Nathan Wise1
ussell E. McCracken Barbara Wright
Dorothy Magee Vivian Zimit
BUSINESS STAFFI
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
A. J. JORDAN, JR.
Assistant Manager
ALEX K. SCHERER
Department Managers
Advertising.............T. Hollister Mabley
Advertising............Kasper H. Halverson;
Advertising............Sherwood A. Upton
Service.....................George A. Spater
Circulation.... ............ Vernor Davis{
Accounts ......................Jahn R. Rose
Publications...........George R. Hamilton
Business Secretary-Matry Chase
Assistants
Byrne M. Badenoch Marvin Kobacker
Jantes E. Cartwright TLawrence Lucey
Robert Crawford Thomas Muir 1
Harry B. Culver George R.Patterson
Thomas M. Davis Charles Sanford I
Norman liezer Lee SlaytonRe
,J(ames Hoffer Joseph Van Riper
Norris Johnson Robert Williamson
Charles Kline Wiliam R. Worboy
Dorothy TBloom gordnr Aice McCully
Laura Codling Sylvia Miller
Agnes Davis Helen E. fusselwhite
Bernice Glaser Eleanor Walkinshawi
1lortense Gooding Dorothea Waterman
,NightEditor-WALTER WILLIS
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1930
STRIDES OF HUMANISM.
"Unless organized religion stops
seeking old, elusive gods and iden-
tifies itself with scientific humanism
in an attempt to improve Man, it is
doomed to perish from the earth."
Thus five of the country's capable
academicians admonished their
brethren of the intelligentsia in a
letter sent out last week to authors,
teachers, scientists and scholars.
But if the above appear intem-
perate, witness this further expli-
cation of the skeptic view which
now overtly permeates the profes-
sorial ranks of our universities.
"The trend of our time is scien-
'tific. . . The great organized
churches are insisting on at least
formal acceptance of a lot of medi-
eval superstititions . . are giv-
ing only lip service to the ideals of
humility, simplicity and friendli-
ness which are characteristics of
Jesus. . . . While the imperial
Diety, seated on a throne and de-
manding worship and flattery is a
myth, the Super-Self of our own
nobler nature, the Hidden Dynamo
within mankind, can and does lead
man from primitive society to the
State, to the Democracy, and on to
that which does not yet ap-
pear. . .."
And so the wrangle continues-
the Pope's boadside denouncing
naturalism followed by a reasser-
tion of the hegemony of human-
ism and the state-to the effect
that we seem again to be on the
brink of a struggle over methods of
equilibration, or- seeking harmony,
in which the old-time missinary
zeal is openly demonstrated by the
skeptics with befitting irony.
BRAYING BROOKHART.

tion about it. VLADIMIR HOROWITZ.- "IN LOVE WITH LOVE" be
The Senate is known for its dig-1I A Review by Dalies Franz. A Review by David Scheyer.
nity, but on occasions it drops its Horowitz played last evening be-j If the reaction of the audience
air of sophistication and indulges fore an audience that was so com- be a just criterion of the worth of 314
in "kidding." Brookhart's remarks pletely impressed with his abilities drama, Vincent Lawrence's com-
prompted such a turn in the Sen- as a pianist that its applause at media, "In Love With Love" as pre-
ate behavior. When a Senator times was almost listless so sub- sented last night by Comedy Club,
breaks in ofi the regular routine dued were the listeners. Any eulogy shall be recorded as one of the
with the startling information that or panegyric of mine would be greatest histrionic triumpls since
'cocktails" were served in a New gratuitous and in bad taste. When Nero's first night Burning of Rome,
York club, the humorous side o 'the critics, counductors and musicians Three hundred engineers, relaxing
Senator comes to the surface. When the world over recognize Horowitz from solemn conclave, viewed the
reminded that liquor could be ob- as the outstanding genius of the romance of a young bridge builder
tained at any one of fifty or more piano today and when the audience with loud and frequent applause.
clubs in any large city, Brookhart in Hill auditorium last night wit- 'a tribute, it must be admitted, both
retorted by classing the informer ncssed the all too obvious justil- to the club's performance and its
"absolutely crazy" on the prohibi- I cation of this redognition, why business acumen.
tion question. should I add my two pennies' The play is an extremnely bantam-
The fanatical remarks of Brook- worth? weight piece of theatre. Act One
hart's and similar drys, supposedly The program, admirably chosen was sprightly enough but the gags
intehded to aid the prohibition to display those qualities whiCm set began to pall a bit when they ap-
cause, actually harm the dry Horowitz apart from other pianists, peared, only slightly refurbished, in
cause. They force the nation to opend with the Busoni transcrip- Act Two. A bit of dramatic revr- -
look upon' all proponents of pro- tion of Bach's Organ Prelude and sal saved the act ending along with
hibition as "witch-burners." As a gorgeously noisy climax. Safe
long as such statements continue ( sentimentalism and a satisfying
to be made, the anti-prohibitionists clinch rounded out the perform-
will find favor among the people ance. Perhaps the brutality of
of the country. These rabid drys .{.synopsis fails to give due credit for
are really enemies of prohibition, the many clever lines and situa- -
for they prevent the nation from tions which called forth hearty and
looking at the question in a rational unrestrained belly-laughter from
manner S even the non-engineering. sections
o_ _ - :...,..: s,......of the audience.
- THERS HOUSECLEAN. Production was far, far better
than the material on which it had
Since the furore over the Iowa to work. The set is probably the
athletic situation has subsided and best "dress-up" interior to' yet
the Carnegie report fails to occupy grace the stage of the Lydia Men-
columns of space on the front page delssohn theatre and, save for a
of newspapers, many universities hesitation waltz act presented by
and colleges throughout the coun- **the second act curtain, the techni-
try are quietly but none the less que ran smoothly-an obvious re-
effectively cleaning up their own I lief after the collapsible lamp-
athletic back yards. posts of other recent shows.
The latest to take definite action ( The nicest thing that happene (
in this direction is Minnesota. An all evening were two young ladies,
investigating committee has been Marion Sears and Jeannette Dale.C
appointed which will consider the - 'Miss Dale playing Ann Jorhan, was
situation from every angle with a by turns coy, disturbed and amor-
view to possible reorganization of ous in a pleasantly convincing
the entire system. The commit- Vladimir Horowitz manner, Miss Stratton, ragging
tee's first work will be the elim- Fuguein D major. Transcriptions her small part with gusto, left a
ination of the abuse of competitive f B orgajorscit or wish that the playwright might
athetcs icldin bthth se-f Bach s organ works either for have permitted her to stage a
athletics, including both the spC l orchestra or piano have been sub- haepritdheosaea
cific and the surreptitious types. ect to pns c s mt o come-back-ragging was needed at
epit~s yesiect to intense criticism; most of maymmns
When this has been stisfactorily tis criticiym is stupid because it.
effected, it will attempt to build up is basedcon inisthe pcipe Robert Adams, in a Tarkington-c
is based on 'principle-the principle . oe.wa ahran n=-
a constructive athletic policy upon of being opposed to transcriptions h roe, was raer annoy
the !ideals of sportsmanship which ed. made so more by the part than by
Shave lately tended to become ob- as a rule-and not on the indivi- any sins of his own. William But-
dual worth or success of the trans- ler, the' boy engineer, turned in a
scured because of proselyting and io.Itemtvesntslfh-
eription, If the motive is not selfish pleasant though not-at-all-over-
ota.l-Oper-Mnena'acti isrwisesnda powering performance. In spots
Minnesota's acton is wise an- art, the process is entirely justifi- Richard Cole did bits of fine act-
timely. If more uiversities would able In this case the motive and
I undertake to follow the same course nting, particularly in the first act as
instead of ptheir ur- the result are quite the opposite the rising young Babbitt. In other
inta tofrcmn theirnr and the piano with Horowitz play- spots he was, let it b said, not
ity to the world, college amateur gy
athletics will be established on a ing it is a thoroughly satisfying so good.,
substitute for the organ. And we All in all -an evening's relaxation
Smuch firmer foundation and theasth utin oudBhhm-
ask the question would Bach him- ere exams descend-and, no doubt,
need Ifor such drastic action as 'el[ have objected? e himsef many a Michigan engineer will re-
will be eliminaerod eonference was one of the world's greatest turn to highways and bridges with
aarrangers a new vision guiding his endea-
Next we heard Scarlatti and vors -
Brahms, and the conclusion of the --
Editorial Comment first group left me reflecting that; t "THANK YOU"
in the four or five times I have After the performances of Ai-
heard Horowitz, never do I recall drocles and Lion, the Detroit Civic
PROPAGANDA. having listened to him in any kind is opening a comedy by Winchell
(From Daily Princetonian) of relaxed state of mind or body. Smith and Tom Cushing that was
His playing inspires a nervous ten- produced by John Golden seine
Commenting on the performance sion on the part. of his listeners few years ago in New York with
of "Journey's End" before the ca- (at least some of them) which may considerable success. It is a com-
dets at West Point, the Herald be accounted for variously: his edy rich with humor considering
Tribune cast some doubt on the ef- playing, even in the Brahms inter- in the comic light with the pr'b-
ficacy of that play as propaganda imezzi and later in the Chopin piec- lems of a. young minister. It is a
against war. It sees in the charac- es, is an intense kind that is not didatic. Sort of thing in an unob-
ter of Captain Stanhope, who is conducive to repose; also, Horo- jectionable way, quietly and sensi-
able to stand the awful nervous witz, - himself at the piano, seems fly discussing interesting slants of
strain only with the aid of liberal entirely unrelaxed. His approach the miniterial life in the manner
doses of whiskey, an epitome of a to the piano, and by that I mean of Shaw, though quite withoutl his
patriotism that sanctions sacrifice what people commonly call meth- lack of sympathy.
of character as well as of life. od (if there is such a thing), re- The Reverend David Lee's niece,
. Undoubtedly the Herald Tribune ifutes all known precepts, concepts, Diana, has just come from Paris
is right in stating that this sort of teachings and what-not about pi- to live with him,-bringing with her
thing idealizes the men who went ano-playing ;he is a law unto him- the European ideas rather foreign
through the war, but we cannot self and by that law evidently is I to the quiet parish which is his

agree with it in the fear that made possible the kind of things home. Diana means complexity for
"Journey's End," taken as a whole, he does. the young minister but in, a crisis
will fill the rising generation with Several other ideas about his she proves herself a worthy rela-
a terrible fascination to share their playing struck me during the tive of her charmingly stolid uni cle,
experiences. Aside from the char- course of the program which may whom she had thought stupid. A
acter of its protagonist, there is im- be of interest. Despite the seem- delightful love story runs through
plicit in Sheriff's drama an ar- ing unity which Horowitz attains the play as a side issue, lightening
raignment of war that should be with his piano, despite the seem- it and enriching its interest. Hunt-
evident and convincing to all but ing oneness of keys and fingers, er Gardner, Emily Ross and George
the most obtuse. he actually plays with a very high Macready have the leading roles.
When, in the course of the act- "linger action. In practically all
ing it becomes necessary to send a 1 ass age work, le uses almost no prejudiced many against Chopin;
raiding party on a suicidal mission jcedal, giving to his playing, even Even the G. minor Ballade, which'
into the enemy trenches, inexor- in quieter moods, a crisp brilliance we have always heretofore consid-
able logic compels the company and clarity. To me it seemed that ered an intensely dramatic work,
commander to select his two finest seldom during the evening did lie received a highly. originalr eadinge
subalterns and ten of his best eni play really pianissimo. His scale This new Chopin was less virile yet
listed men. The very men who were of dynanmics upwards is seemingly less ingratiating -on the whole a I
inherently bravest, most intelligent so unlimited and his fortissimos so, inew friend which we lik edi rather
and most promising as citizens of I tremendous that when he does well.
England in time pf peace were au- play piano or even mezzo-piano it The Carmen fantasy which closed
tomatically singled out for distruc- really seems much softer than is the program was a display piece
tion. actually the case. Perhaps here composed for the sole purpose. of'
Here we have in a nutshell an in1 lies the secret of the brilliance of I showing a phenomenal technique.
vincible argument against any pos- his playing. Iit may be Horowitz will be criti-
sible justification of war as a Eut he also does that which few cised by those to whom virtuosity
means to a hypothetically desir- pianists ever do: lie plays softly for for its own sake is conslacred a sin.'
able end. It is a vivid demonstra- long intervals of time; not only is But .good heavens, when one has
tion of the fact that all belligerents a phrase or a line of the music such equipment why not exhibit it?

DAN1CING
at the
ARMORY

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Every
WED. AND SAT. ITE
Hot Music By
BEN'S
BLUE BLOWERS
Evcrybody Wclcomc

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LtJililJl.iLLw'tJSil1L ' 1iLitltl i lli t

rt

FIRST METHODISTI
CHURCH
Cor. S. State and E. Washington Sts.
Min., Rev. Arthur W. Stalker, D. D.
Associate Minister, Rev. Samuel J.
. Harrison Student Director, Mr.
Ralph Johnsot- Mrs. Allura Win-
ters, Advisor of Women Students.
10:30 A. M.--Morning Worship.
Serics: "Four Major Motives of
Life:" I. "PROFIT." Dr.
Arthur W. Stalker.
12:00 M. Three Discussion Groups
Prof. 9. F. Gingerich, Prof.
Geo. E. Carrothers, and Ralph R.
Johnson. .
6:00 P. M.--DR. ROBERT E.
BROWN-of Wuhu, China will
speak at the Wesleyan Guild
7:30 P. M.-"THE PRESENT
SITUATION IN CHINA," an
illustrated missionary a d d r e s s
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
On East Huron, west of State
Rev. R. Edward Sayles, Minister
Howard R. Chapman, Minister for
Students.
9:45 'A. M.-The Church School.
Wallace Watt, Superintendent.
Classes for all groups. The Uni-
versity class meets at Guild House.
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Mr. Sayles will preach. "RE-
LIGION AS A MODEOF LIFE."
5:30 P. .M.-Friendship Hour at
Guild House. All young people.
6:30 P. M.-Devotional reeting.
Mr. Chapman will speak.
BETHLEHEM
EVANGELICAL CHURCH
(Evangelical Synod of N. A.)
Fourth Ave. between Packard and
William
Rev. Theodore R. Schmale
9:00 A. M-Bible School.
10:00 A. M.--Morning Worship.
Sermon topic: "Religious Indif-
ference."
11:00 A. M-German Service,
7:00 P. M. -- Yong 'People's
League. Leader: Theodore L.
Trost. Discussion topic: "How
Get Ready for a New Age?"
ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
Washington St. at Fifth Ave.
E. C. StelihortAE Pastor
10:30 A. M.--Morning Service.
Sermon topic: "Doing Good with
Pleasure"
12:00 M.-Student Bible Class
5:30 P. M.-Student Fellowship and

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division Sts.
Merle H. Anderson, Minister
Mrs. Nellie B. Cadwell, Counsellor
for University Women.
Sunday Mornings in February-
"ANCIENT PORTRAITS OF
MODERN MEN."
Feb. 2-
10:45 - "An Ancient Business
Man and His Ethics."
12:00-Class in "Modern Religi.
ous Problems," Professor Mc-
Clusky.
5:30-7:30--Young People's Soc ia['
Hour and, Devotional Meeting.
Leader: Registrar Ira M. Smith.
TUNE IN!
Sunday Morning Service
of the
DETROIT UNITY CENT1R
br"adcast frwn
The Detroit Civic Theatre
11:30A.M.Easternstand.Tim
10:30 A.L Central Stand. Time.
EVERY 74URSDAY EN"G
(Beginnineg an. 9, 93G)
LECTURE ON PRINCIPLES
Oi SUOCSSFUL LIVING
Seting forth-the Principles by wh"
sana may unfold within his life the
HmIth.Peacad Prosperity which
Glod hs provided.C
11:05 P.M. Eastern Stand. Ti
"10:03 P.M. CeVtral StauL. Time,

, ---- .

HILLEL FOUNDATION

615 E. University

tial 3779

8:30- P. M.-OPEN HIOUSE AT
FOUNDATION.

. d*

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
State and William
Allison Ray Heaps, Minister
February 2, 1930
9:30 A. M.-Church School.
10:45 A. M---Morning Worship.
Sermoii topic--The third and last
in ther seriesof "Paths to Power-
Sc If- conrtoI."
5:10 P. M.-*-Student Fellowship
Suipper.
6:30 IP. M.-Walter L. Hastings
lectures on "Birds and Mammals:
of Michigan" illustrated with mov-
ing pictures.
ST. ANDREW'S
EiPISC OPAL CHURCH
Division and Catherine Sis.
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector
Rev. T. L. harris, Assistant
8:00 A. M.-Holy Communion.
9:30 A. M.--Holy Communion.
(Student chapel in Harris Hall.)
9:30 A. M.-Church School. (Kin-
dergarten at 11 o'clock)
11:00 A. M.-Holy Communion;
sermon by Mr. Lewis.
6:30 P. M.-Student Supper in
Harris Hall.)
7:45 P. M.---Livening Prayer; spe-
cial music by men's and boys' vest-
ed choir.

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BE CONSLSTENT
IN YOUR RELLGION
ATTEND CHURCH
REGULARLY

FIRST CHURCH
CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 S. Di' s o St.
10:30 A. MA.-Regulai Morning Serv-
ice. Sermon topic: "LOVE "
11:-y A. M.--Suniday School follow-
ing the morning service.
7:30 P. M.--\ edWesday Evening
testimnonial meeting.
The Reading Root-n, 10 and U
te Svng Batk Butldng, is open

ST PAUL'S LUTHERAN
CIURCH
(Missouri Synod)
Thitd and West Liberty Sts.
C. A. Brauer, Pastor

11

enator Smith W. Brookhart,j
bombastic Republican from Iowa,
succeeded two days ago in fully
classifying himself among the "son
of wild jackasses" when he went on
another rampage against "high so-I
ciety" scofflaws.f
Mr. Brookhart attained about asl

9:00 A. M,--German.
10:00 A. M.-Bible Class.
11:00 A. M.-English. Sermon,
"The Compassionate Savior."
Service in theGerman Janguage
There will be no meeting of the btu-
dents at 6:00 or 6:30 p.Nm.

Supper.
6:30 P. M-Student Fotum

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7:30 P. M.-H-olly Communion
in the German language.

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