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October 05, 1929 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-10-05

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tATURDAY,

OCTOBER 5, 1929

TH E MICHIGAN

DAILY

.x

tAGE TnR4

RUTIVEN'S SIX PREDECESSORS AS MICHIGAN PRESIDENTS

1852-1863

1863-1869

1871-1909
s

1910-1920

1920-1925

*

1 925-1929

Henry Phillip Tappan
9 astus O; Haven

Harry Burns Hutchins

Marion LeRoy Burton

Clarence Cook Little

James Burrill Angell

SPETUDEATH OP' STR ESSE
StATESM AN AN
A ARflA.With the death of Gustav Strese-
mann,the German foreign minis-
ter, the German republic is faced
with a great loss. The trend of
Walter Phelps North, '30L, has Stresemann's life was a remarkable
been awarded the Class of 1908 one. In very few men as famous as
Memorial scholarship in recogni- the German diplomat has there been
Lion of the high scholastic record so remarkable a' change of charac-
made by him last year. This ter. Stresemann had from the startI
scholarship, given by Guy B. Find- planned to enter the political field,1
ley in memory of his class, is and his first step was in attempting
awarded at the beginning of each to enter the Socialist party. He
school year to that student who has failed in this endeavor and conse-
attained the highest rank in the quently organized the people's
second-year class of the preceding party, in power in Germany at
year. present. His early political career
North, who received all A's dur- ,was merely a sucession of attempts
ing his second year, is the son of Ito play politics for what there was
Chief Justice North of the Michi- in it for him. One of the outstand-
gan Supreme court. ing periods in Stresemann's life,
however, was the surprising change
in his attitude towards an official
(By Assmiated Press)(' capacity in government. On the day
ATHENS, Greece.-The Grecian 'that he was a chosen foreign min-
government. today order-d from ister, he was faced with a very
Italy two destroyers, to cost $1,- grave situation in the Reichstag,
125,000 each. and immediately his entire charac-

r ]}
V.

VIAN ROBS GERMANY OF EMINENT rMany Schools Reject PRINCETON, NEW JR SEY.-
D DIPLOMAT SAYS REED IN INTERVIEW Old Frosh Traditions' Senior students of Princet n Uni-
,versity are protesting agai ist the
ter changed. The crucial attack the Young plan for German repara- The decline of the traditional great amount of building going on
within the German congress stif- tions will be as nearly carried out humbleness of freshmen at Mich- at the university. Bitter arnd scath-
fended him and simultaneously his with the absence of Stresemann as igan seems to be put part of the ng comments have been 1blished
.twith him. The only difficulty that general change which is graduafly
strength of character and integrity might occur, according to Professor taking place in all the leading col-
won the confidence of the German I Reed, is that the lack of Strese- leges of the United States. Haz-
people. mann's influence to be felt be- ing is becoming milder every year.
Prominent European statesmen twen Germany and France. The At Princeton this year the tribunal
have stated that even if the German minister's effort for peace are read- in charge of such things has re-
.ily seen by his friendly affiliations duced the humiliation of the fresh-
Nationalist party came back in with the French republic, men to two customs; the wearing
power, Stresemann would have re- Cnc oof the "frosh caps"; and the neck-
tamed his position. He had an iron tavStresemann, the general con- tie rule which forbids yearlings to
grip on international affairs and cucusem nn t oe tha wear other than black rainment I
also the extreme confidence of his' ere i noeemsytom ient about their necks. Columbia, one
there is no extremely prominent
people, so that obviously his death figure now in Germany who could of the largest universities in the l
will make a great difference to his immediately step in and fill his United States, a few days ago upsetCA
country.pi a tradition of 175 years standing G
Professor Thomas H. Reed of the position. when it abolished its long famous HAWKS AND
Political Science department stated custom of hazing and "all similar
that "the death of Stresemann will Prof. N. C. Kist, professor of undergraduate sins". SimilarCA
be a great loss to Germany and bridge engineering at the Technical changes have taken place at other
Europe. He was a liberal, moderate University at Delft, Holland, has leading universities, followed by the
and reasonable in international been invited to speak to the stu- abolition of fraternity initiations. \inquire at
politics and inclined to views to Will Michigan eventually follow the
promote peace." Professor Reed dents and faculty of the engineer- lead of her sister universities and
also stated that he believes that ing school October 22. become more civilized? _______

in the Princetonian comparing th6
future condition of the compus to
"a well built up apartment house.
location." New dormitories are be-
lieved to be the cause of the resent-
ment.

,.11 ?

ARSON

sents

UE ORCHESTRA
IS ORCHESRTA
[IS ORCHESTRA

the Parrot

mrrm- -

i

CHOJIAL

UNION

u AIF N
"IlNu.ERT

MAINTAINED BY

THE UNIVERSITY

MUSICAL

SOCIETY
Earl V. Moore, Musical Director

Charles A. Sink, President
1929-Fifty-First Annual Series-1930
October 15-GIOVANNI MARTINELLI, Metro.
politan Opera Company Tenor, in song
recital.
October 30-DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHES-
TRA, OSSIP GABRILOWITSCH,
Conductor.
Nov'mber 7-IGNACE JAN PADERWSKI, World's
most noted 'nianist, in recital.

Ann Arbor, Michigan

IGNACE JAN
PADEREWSKI

1929-Fifty-First Annal Series-1930
t"mbr - LNER-BUDAPEST STRING
QUA RTET
jno Lener Imre Hartman
Joseph Smilovits Sandor Roth
December iO---CLAUDIA MUZIO, Prima Donna
Dramatic Soprano, Chicago Civic Op-
era Association, in recital
January i6-JASCHA HIFUETZ, in violin recital.
Janar y 1 -VADJMIR HOROWITZ, in piano
recital.

JASICIA

November

19-THE ENGLISH SINGERS, of London.
Flora Mann Norman Notley
Nellie Carson Cuthbert Kelly
Lillian Berger Norman Stone .

February I2--LISABUTH RE3THBERG,
politain Opera Dramatic Prima
Soprona, in recital.

Metro-
Donna

CLAUDIA
MUZIO

in a program of madrigals, folk songs,
ballets, canzonets and other music.'
Fifty-First Annoal
Choral Union Series

March J1-DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHES,
TRA, GOSSIP GABRILOWITSCH,
Conductor.
Mk'bigan's Greatest
Concert Series

ELISABETH
RETIIBERG

HILL AUDITORIUM

"' Over-the"-Counter" Sale Begins Monday, Oct. 7, :30 A. M.
At School of Music Building

GIOVANNI
MARTINELLI

Beginning then and continuing until the limited number remaining
sale at $6-$8:-$-$10 andx$12.

is exhausted, all remaining course

tickets will be on public

VLADIMIR
HOROWITZ

FAI gmmrppR - M '

:: -

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