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January 15, 1930 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-01-15

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY" 1 , '1930

PAGE FOUR WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 1930
THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Published every morning except Monday
during the flniversity year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to. the use for republication of all news dis-
patches creditedto it or not otherwisecredited
in this 'Paper and the local news published
herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postagegranted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
$4.50..
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May.
niard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
11Telephone 4925
"I" MANAGING EDITOR
ELLIS B. MERRY
Editorial Chairman........George C. Tilley
City Editor...............Pierce Rosenberg
News Editor................ Donald J. Kline
Sports Editor.......Edward L. Warner, Jr.
Women's Editor...........Marjorie Folmer
Telegraph Editor.........Cassam A. Wilson
Music and D~rama........ William J. Gorman
LiteraryEditor..........Lawrence R. Klein
Assistant City Editor.... Robert J. Feldman
Night Editors-Editorial Board Members
Frank E. Cooper Henry J. Merry
William C. Gentry Robert L. Sloss
CharCs R. Ka iWalter W.Wild,
Gur ney WVilliams
Reporters
Bertram Askwith Lester May
Helen Barc David M. Nichol
Maxwell Bauer William Page
Mary L. Behymer Howard H1. Peckham
Benjamin H. Berentsonllugh Plerce
Allan H. ierkman Victor Rabinowitz
Arthur J.. lernstein John D. Reindel
SBeach, Conger Jeannie Ioberts
Thomas AT. Cooley Joseph A. Russell
ohn H. Denler Joseph Ruwitch
kelen Domine William P. Salzarulo
Margaret Eckels Clarles R. Sprowl
Kathearine serrin S. Cad well Swanson
Sheldon C. Fullerton Jane Thayer
Ruth Geddes ]l argaret Thompson
Ginevra Ginz Richard L. Tobin
Jack Goldsmith Elizabeth Valentine
Morris Groverman Harold 0. Warren, Jr.
Ross Gustin Charles White
Margaret Harris G. Lionel Willens
David B. lHempstead John E. Willoughby
3.sl Cullen Kennedy, Nathan WVise
ean Levy Barbara Wright
ssel I McCracken Vivian ihit
Dorothy Magec
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
A. J. JORDAN, JR.
Assistant Manager
ALEX K. SCHERER
Department Managers
Advertising.............F .Hollister Mabley
Advertising... .e........Naspe r1. alverson
Advertising ............Serxuoud A. Upton
Service.................... e . Spater
Circulation........... . VXernor Davis
Accounts.....................John R. Rose
Publications............eorge R. Hamilton
Business Secretary-Mary Chase
Assistants
Byrne M. B~adenoch AMarvin Kobacker
James E. Cartwright Iawrence Lucey
Robert Crawford Thomas Muir
Harry B.s Culver George . Patterson'
Thomas M. Davis Chares Sanford
Norman Eliezer Lee Slavyiun
J ames-Hoffer Jseph Van Riper
orris Johnson Robert Williamson
Charles Kline William R. Worboy

the demand for what retribution
could have been made then and can
still be made. The students should
certainly receive next considera-
tion to the bondholders and be giv-
en the seats on either side of them
from the 30-yard lines to the goal
lines.
At present they are all lumped
on one side of the bondholders with I
the result that more than half of
them sit beyond the limits of the!
playing field. Their demand, as it
will be voiced by the Student coun-
cil members of the point commit-
tee, that studeits should also be
given the playing-field seats on the
other side of the bondholders.
seems eminently justified and re-
asonable.
0
GIVE HOCKEY THE STATUS
IT DESERVES.
Through the erection of the new
skating rink last year, hockey as
a sport at the University seemed
on the point of coming into its
rightful own. Yet with the prelim-
Inary contests of the second sea-
son since those facilities were made
available for Varsity and general
use now passed, the expected wave
of popular enthusiasm for hockey
seems to be tremedously near low
ebb. This is not to say that there
is prevalent on the campus today
no interest in intercollegiate hock-
ey; on the contrary, a quite appa-
rent undercurrent of student opin-
ion favors hockey as a sport involv-
ing clever, fast and skillful playing
and as an exciting, zestful form of
competition from the view of the
spectator. Last Saturday night's
crowd is testimony to this. The
situation remains, nevertheless,
that at the present time, hockey
exists merely as a minor sport
which, irrespective of its obvious
worth, receives very little overt
recognition from the general run
of students.
Further deficiencies of hockey's
status at Michigan are attested
by a comparison of the foregoing
analysis to the situation at other
universities. At the beginning of
the current season, 170 seeded play-
ers reported for the squad at Har-
vard, and 75 signed up at Yale. To
date, 15 men are playing on Mich-
igan's squad. This obvious lack of
reserve strength made Michigan's
team an easy prey for Yale when
the latter was able to insert three
separate teams into the play at
Lake Placid during the holidays.
In virtually every sector of the
country where ice rinks are avail-
able, both intercollegiate amateur
hockey and the professional game
are well accorded.
The state of affairs - here has
been produced largely by two forces,
namely the newness of the sport at
Michigan, and the lack of seating
facilities for spectators coupled
with the fifty-cent admittance
charge for hockey games. The for-
mer reason has been practically
non-operative during the past sea-
son; hockey has been played at
Michigan for five years and is well-
established in the athletic picture.
The prevalence of the second
cause, however, is at once the chief

activator of student non-support
and the occasion for this writing.
To the informed reader, the pre-
ceeding summary of hockey's stand-
ing at Michigan will appear as an
understatement. This has been
done in fairness to the viewpoint of
the Athletic administration, to
whom this plea is directed. In real-
ity, there is little doubt that a well-
defined element of the student
body, numerically large, is willing
to exhibit a strong positive interest
in hockey should that sport receiveI
the same standing as other games
to which admission may be gained
by presenting athletic coupon
books. In asking that the fifty-
cent tariff for withnessing hockey
games be removed, it is recognized
that in fact the charge is made not1
for seeing the games but for the
privilege accorded the spectators of
skating after the play is finished.
This right is sought and used only
by a few of those who are interest-
ed in seeing the games, hence the
continuance of the charge would
mean that either a large number
of spectators would pay for a priv-
ilege which they have no interest
in exercising, or they would re-
main away from the games entire-
ly.
I The diciontinuance. at least ten- f

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OATD OLL
DID YOUU EVER
SEE SLUSH
WEATHER?

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?.aura Codling
Agnes Davis
Bernice Glaser'
ortense Gooding
Alice McCully

Sylvia Muller
Helen E. lusselwhite
I'leanor Valkinshaw
Dloro thea WVaterman

A local journalism instructor t
states that weather is of greater
news value than most people think,
and that, especially now, the news-
papers are featuring it on the front'
page.
* * *
Yes, sir, the weather these days
is something to talk about. And to
revert to a colloquialism, can you
feature it?
* * *
I can't trust myself to say more
anent it in a family column inas-
much as I just stepped off a curb
into a five inch puddle of partially
decayed snow.
* * *
DISGRUNTLED READER.
Dear Joe:
I read with great interest the
feature upon the two dancers which
appeared last Saturday in The
Daily.
I noted with glee that one of
your coy writers who signed the
article with only his initials was
the perpetrator. (Will the Daily
boys never realize that anonymity
through initials is absurd with a
'list of the staff appearing on page
four, altho I understand Bill Gor.
man has had a heck of a time ex--
plaining he didn't write it, poo
fella).
W. C. G. was evidently in such a1
state about finding out that the
atrtists can be humans, that he
didn't elaborate much. I should
like to help:
....Harald and Yvonne (the per-
sonal reference is made atitheir
own request ) (1) speak English to
some extent but Friedchick (2) is
making his first tour....
...Frankly, but without mean-
ing ridicule for the trio, these
three German artists reminded us
more of three University students
on a tour than the temperamental
artists they are supposed to be. (3)
....a small supper was served in
the Russian room of the Women's
League building. During the course
of "the evening and after much
gestulation (5), it was finally made
clear that the three wanted to go
sleigh-riding the next morning.
Specifications were exact - four
horses, straw in the cutter, and lots
of bells. (6)
. ..Yvonne was a vivacious indi-
vidual. She shed her fur coat (7),
and ran beside or ahead of the ve-
hicle for the greater part of the
trip (8).
(1) You old rounder, you!
(2) See Culinary notes, page 8,
Farm and Home section.
(3) "Smile when you call me
that."
(4) Ma Henderson tries to avert
international crisis.
(5) Three gestulations equal one
hour of Eastern Christian time.
(6) The Daily policy forbade
mention of Mullison's stables,
Post's Bran Flakes ,and the West-
minster Chimes, by courtesy of the
Knight Watch company, from WJZ.
(7) To say nothing of what the
coat might do.
(8) I had that horse once, too.
Sincerely,
Graham Crachor.
* * *
Well, that's a load off your mind,
isn't it, Graham? Now, regardless
of Daily policy, might I suggest
that you try sonmc Posts' Bran
Flakes? They'll remove that
grumpy disposition.
* * *.
Note to the gent who calls hin-

self AK-SAR-BEN: I'd have print-
ed your letter about a dating bu-
reau but I couldn't afford to spend
the necessary time reconstructing
your unique spelling. The dating
bureau idea has been suggested
several times but I cain see poten-
tial complications that destroy my
enthusiasm for such an organiza-
tion.
Never mind what.
Lonesome Coed hasn't written
for several days, now. I'll bet that
last poem of mine made her sore.
Don't forget to have tea this af-
ternoon in the Russian tea room
at the League. The girls wear
smocks and everything but men
are for some reason lacking among
the regular clientele. It's no dis-
grace to drink tea. Most fellas will
drink anything, so why stop at
tea?1

Music AndUrana
"THE LOVE DUEL"
A Review
Lili Hatvany, the Hungarian au-
thoress, insults-at least disappoints
-the intelligence quite thoroughly.
Ethel Barrymore, eminent actress
in the title role, gives the emotions
an exhilarating, thoroughly satis-
factory workout. So the advice is
to consult one's mental predisposi-
tions before going to Detroit.
The play starts briskly enough.
He and She, as the program calls
the protagonists, are triumphant
middle-aged survivors of , many
love-conflicts. They are wounded
and bitter, not because they ever
lost, but because the irresistible
urge of both sexes to be conquered
called upon their felling talents
too frequently. The result is they
are bored. Wit is their weapon of
defense against the ready to-be-
conquered world. Mutual admira-
Lion for their individual prowess
brings a challenge to a love duel.
All that first act is smart enough
writing. The sophistication, because
it conceals such a wealth of real
feeling, is highly suggestive. But
after the stage has been set for
this supernaturalhpassion based on
a pyrotechnic display of love's
tricks, the author resorts to the
continued-story technique, which
is nothing more than an evasion
on her part of the more diflicult
implications of her situation. The
first four months of the duel (cer-
tainly the most interesting period)
are skipped between the first and
second acts. By the end of the sec-
ond act, the duel has left the bat-
tlefield of wit, the clash of intel-
lects, for the somewhat more
serious, but less interesting, realm
of maternity. Lydia, the woman,
has a baby by her rival-which is
a technical error in the science of
duelling. Realizing hr essential:
defeat, she goes to Switzerland to
hide with the little stranger.
The writing in the third act is
nothing short of maudlin. He finds
Her out in 11er little cabin in the
mountains, demands to see the
man that has won her affections.
She shows him the little man on
onth old and they clinch as the
curtain goes clow .
Ethel Barrymore makes her part
something more creditable thia I
the writing of it. Thre is a curious
sort of tremor, a shiiinlnerinig i in
tensity so to speak, about her every
move; the real reaso, in terms of
technique, never becomes quite ap-
parent. Then her versatile voice
helps; she uses it like she would
use a gesture, the pointed lines be-
ing growled harshly aid clearly,
and the somewhat empty oes be-
ing sung so pleasingly tatw
didn't care about their content.,
THE MORGAN TRIO.
A Review.
It was so exclusively a romantic
evening (with all energies seem-
ingly so concentrated on that ro-
mantic quality charm) that it
seems dishonorable or impure to
be uncharming about it. Melody,
that friend of the romantic com-
poser and performer, was the thing.
Most of the other aspects of te
f musical problem were quite frank-
ly avoided by the Morgan Trio. The
result was disconcerting in the case
of the eighteenth century composi-
tions and they offered. The sim-
plicity and purity of the architec-
ture was quite destroyed by over--

concern with romantic phrasing of
the melodies. One would hazard the
judgment that the Morgan Sisters
are not quite musicians enough to
play in the eighteenth century,
eminently a musical period with
none of the impurities of romanti-
cism.
With the moderns, Debussy Dc-_
.Walla, and Ravel, structure was
quite less important, consistent im-
mediacy of effect (perhaps the
definition of musical charm) be-
ing the main intention. The Sisters
were more successful here especial-
ly as the modern colorists used the
color possibilities of the peculiar
combination more knowingly.
Though granting it a certain ap-
peal because of comparative novel-
ty, the harp appears quite unsatis-
factory as a solo instrument. The
very method of its tone production
is disconcerting. It builds up a
tonal mass very carefully with in-
dividual ephemeral units; the re-
sult of the process is a very vague
and confused whole, that is almost
its units in dissipation. It is a fault
inherent in the instrument, not due
to the performer, who seemed quite!
capable.
Miss Frances Morgan's violin wvas
merely cautious and generally cor-
rect. Outside of that.itws n ,in-

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State and William St.

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Scranton, Pocaho otas
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This business has been growing eaer
since it was established. The secret-
"giving absolute satisfaction to wur
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CORNWELL COAL - COKE
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Phw-inea. Office :4M51-4552 Ysrd Office: 652

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When you desire food
and quality and a quiet
place to chat with a
friend Choose

Night Editor- WALTER WILDS
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 1930
THE FOOTBALL TICKETS.
After three seasons of bittgr criti-
cism, the Board of Control of Ath-
letics has finally taken a definite
step in the direction of providing
students with seats between the
goal lines at football games. A com-
mittee of the athletic board has
been appointed to confer on the
matter with a committee of the
Student council.
This action, though delayed, is
welcome. It means that the secrets
of the ticket distribution system
will at last be dragged in their en-
tirety from the corner in which
they have long been guarded, and
exposed to the gaze of a puzzled
student body that has repeatedly
been disappointed in its hopes of
seeing a whole game from goal
line to goal line. The mystery of
who get the good seats has always
been a potent source of speculation,
and of late a considerable source
of anger to the students who pro-
vide 'the team, whose interest in the
game makes it what it is, whose'
loyalty to the team is nearest and
greatest, and whose interest in the
play is the most homogeneous and
vital.
The biggest factor in the stu-
dents' anger are the occupants of
the seats between the 30-yard lines
on the west tide (the Main street
side) of the bowl. Of these seats
1200, of course, are reserved for the
chering section, ond nobody will
carp at that arrangement, But
this still leaves several thousand
of the best seats, the privilege of
sitting on which is not even ac-
corded.,he faculty, but goes to the
"University's guests" and to cer-
tain -persons who have a prior lien
on them by virtue of having lent
their money to finance the stadi-
um's construction. Regrettable as
this is, the unfortunate fact re-
mains that this prior lien of theI

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