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November 23, 1929 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-11-23

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PAGE TWO

TH1E MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY. NOVEMBER. 23, 1:x20

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V B ICOD~I N Victor Clarence Vaughan, 1851-1929 Profec
FAMOUS SCIENTIST. y Wpogrds
DIESINRICHMOND9'
Received First Ph. D. Degree,',t ;"y 4?sxr lie is di
Given by Universty ~~ excavati
in1876.' 'ootu
PIONEERED IN HYGIENE ( =' y eg
Was Dean of University Medical -,
School Until Retirement.i LA
in 1921.;
(Continued from Page ,1)
after he entered upon this service.,
hiss attention was given to the in- 1..
vestigation of the cause~ of foodr
poisoning, especially that of cheese; y
and1 milk. At this time, though bac- t"
terlology was in its infancy, heI
soon realized that the poisonous
products were due to' bacterial!
action. He was among the first to
teach that cholera infantum was ! wit
due to contamination of milk by jba
harmful bacteria.. }ea
Recognizing the need of an insti-
tution in Which problems pertain-I
ing to health and disease, could be
studied, with the co-operation of -
the state board of health, hie pre--.----- -___ __-_-
vailed upon the state legislature o £ Ihonor. logical chemistry and associate
1887 to establish the hygienic lab-j As a member of the National Pie-; professor of therapeutics and ma- i
oratory, the first of its kind in this I search council, which came into be-~ teria medica. He was director of the the
country. As stated at the time, te(nga h eus fPeietWl
abject of, this laboratory was first; g a h eus fPeietWl hygienic laboratory from 1887 to Screen
totsud hecauaton f dseaeson, Dr. Vaughan participated in 1909. In 1891, Dr. Vaughan became
second, to make analyses of food he work of that body by his wise ;dean of the Department of MVedi-1
and of water supplies, and third, council and his vast experience. cine and Surgery, now -the medical
teaching the causes of disease. The Dr. Vaughan's academic duties, school, which position he held until
laboratory was opened for work in other than those connected with his retirement in 1921. At the time Ili
January, 1889, and for 20 years Dr.I the hygienic laboratory, began in of his death, he was professor em-!Fis
Vaughan was active as its director. 1883 with his appointmenit as pro-; eritus of hygiene and physiological' Ail-
In 1903 on the occasion of the first .Iessor of physiologica and patho- chemistry. Talki
serious outbreak of rabies; in Mich- Pictur-~.. ..
igan. Dr. Vaughan asked for, and
pbtained, the establishment of a
Pasteur institute as part of thel -
hygienic laboratory. At that time I
the anti-rabic treatment was not IthsTheI
given except in two or three places J0hs__________________
in this country. Pro gram famou
No mention of Dr. Vaughan's tne world fmosLI
Activities would be complete with.- doesn't radio and record MWS
out reference to his services in theMO
AtV otra fteS-Star E L
army. ntte otra o h pa please CL
ish <American war, he volunteered ALL
his services and saw active service I 'ou- .dm
at Santiago wheret. he i con tte gfay4
yellow fever. The most c,eporaoie I somethingr
fact in connection with that w ar I nc
was the outbreak of serious diseasei is hay
among the troops in the dierent "S
cnetaincamps.Laboratory Iwiire lcsjack
methods were non-existent in the.ben
caliaps and the prevailinig diseaseben
was called malara, or typho-mal,- '.b
ria, rarely by its true name, typhoid m ill be e 'rJ
!Fever. IflAMAA-
At the close of the war, a com- sunday
mission, consisting of Majors Wal- 1 hear the crooning star of
ter Reed, V. C. Vaughan, and E. ® 0.ligr f rawy c esn
Shakespeare, was appointed to in- I dig+so roda"Ii esn
vestigate the outbreak. The' final 1 in his greatest its you'll
report of that commission was pre- I*rmme
pared by Dr. Vaughan as the only ' ! ' r t
surviving member. It showed the
astonishing fact that 86.24 per cent i
of the total deaths were due to ty- on the sceen the delightfultesaro
phoid fever. This report forcibly at- blondec
tracted :attention to tb~e necessity "olyood
of conducting military ca . paigns
under strict hygienic conditions.}
In the interval between this and a . i-iJ
the World war, improved diagnosis h ardtleg o
to avoid this scourge.
Upon the United States' en-i
trance into the war, Dr. Vaughan Iith altlkgro niccerunroies.
*As again called upon to give his f ntealtligrmni
services. As one of the board in cmd
ch rge of the commiunicable dis- Icmd
eases in our camps, he served withj "herprvt
;ability and distinction, receiving, private
the rank of colonel, the Distingu-
!,shed Service Medal, and the deco-}

ration of the French Legion of l ilt~

-,ssor Waterman Reports Progress in
1ork of Michigan Mesopotamia Expedition
has been received" from, nowV Practically finished andi was

To Exhibit Letters

Will Show Posters

r Leroy Waterman of the
sdepartment regarding the
3of the work of the Urrtiver-
Michigan-Toledo Museum
gical expedition which
recting and which is now,
ing on the site of the an-
4ucia on the Tigris in Mes-
epedition's house. which

able to withstand a rain storm of
unusual violence for that region
wh.;iy. c came about a month earlier
i han Cic normal winter rains.
One of the graves found in a
large tomb has yielded a. rich find
of ornaments. inc :,J ng pendants,'
,;f ais. fingerrings, gold foil, silver
earrings, bracelets, and many beads,
of stone, :gate, caf'nelan, amber.

Robert Brooks. prominent Amer- Another of the series of art dx-
iean airmail collector, will exhibit .hibitions being held by the archi-
6,000 airmail letters of his coilec- tectural school now features the-
tiar atthemeein f te An 'third floor exhibition room of tie
tiona te metin pftheAnnArc~iitectural building. This one is
Arbor Stamp club this evening in in the form of a Jisplay of adver-
rooms 319-321 of the Union. tusing posters collected in Europe.

9
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lour ° :',
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Hark To His Master's Voice! Saying
GO""To UNIVERSITY MUSIC HOUSE
For Everything Musical

~1

,un during the summer, is = i, aiz,-lazuli, eb)oiy and gold.

ST TIMES
TQDAY

W'UERTH

LAST TIMES
TODAY

Screens First Operetta
Denl
A PICTURE THAT WILL LIVE FOREVER
IN YOUR MEMORY!
[he sutpreme cad-iievement of the motion pictitre art presented

I...

Lowes~tt
TERMS
to suit.
Play while
yoti pay.

Radios:-
Majestic, Victor, Crosley
Pianros:-
Bld wini, Kohler & Campbell
Orchestral Instruments
Victor, Columbia, Brunswick
Records

P" fr hwrw
?h bWst muuc 5
Th6t inR d

ASK THOMAS HINSHAW, Mgr.
601 Gast WXilliami Street Phone 7516

't.

2

hboundless magnificence and un'aralleled ben
:essions of bewitching song extravaganza held ton
tutiful story ever told!
COMJINGSUNDAY-"FLI

it
ire< Th Gr
! Mystery - TI
LYAN Inil of Myste
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TAGUE airy of Myste
,OV -The Crooks
RUDEMytr-T
ASTER ' Siren of My
any other ____ ' tery - A Mat
,rites Storm of My
eery -- A N
Jy DRUMMOND.

.auty-a Staggering -----
)-ether by the most !;il 111111111111111111111 IIIllli1111111 IIH11111111111.1t 111WI1111 IIIH11IIJIIUIU1111( lII
I -
I H~h-
Tody-
Just nwOl Spaish Wil be -
C u t m t s o v = a d M ny T rll . -
U -
Jus AnfloSrnshw ll fedservedo th
DI -
ery IOWA GAM
els-
*Director of Musical Caetri
,rangement
With Songs" -
1111l1111111111111111111[iIIIll 11fIII 111111111111t1 U 111111111llll

if
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pwning Joy

Paray
'Bob Iowland.
Arr
Month-Al Jolson in "Say It

t1 V I l r rl "

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Abon the f loor,

Ate,
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r
ow~k NAP
cigrete is A

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SERVIC
Mellowed by the experience of sixty
years .. fi'red by the enthusiasm
which maintains constant leadership
. that is the truly helpf ul banking
connection.. t
ti

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.

"HIT THE NAIL on the head" ... cut out the
frills, give smokers the one thing they want
and sales will take care of themselves.
At least, that's the Chesterfield platform. The
one thing smokers want is good taste-and that's
the one thing we're interested in giving them-
"'TASTE ao ve e verythizy,.

fl A
Gp
\\2yr

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MILD ,.,.. and yet
THEY SATISFY

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