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November 19, 1929 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-11-19

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THE MICHIGAN DILY

TUESDAY, NOVEMI;,-Vi 19, 1929

a

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"Published every morningexcept' Monday,
during the University year ,by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Mdember of Western Conference Editorial
Asbociation.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not. otherwise credited
in this payer and the local news published
herein.
Entered at the pasta. .ce at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate'
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
suaster General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail, $4.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
Oard Street.
Phones:j Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF

sits on the board.
The essential idea to be worked ~ A o k
out is the selection of the Union ! "A outBo k '
heads by a student-faculty board I________________
similar to the present Boar"d in 1,6-IGTE
Control of Student Publi IHGWL1OGIRANC
which names the managing editors'
and business managers of the vari- Tharoughi France With A Sketchi
ous publications.; Book!
The amendment might well not IbySamruel Chamnber'aiui
go into effect until the spring of Robert M. McBride & Company'
1931, thus avoiding too rapid tran- Ne Yr, 12
sition and opposition based on up- pp.I09
setting campaign plans for this If you arc contemplating an

MusicAd1
0- --

_.. O I ____ - - - -----
. W I u E

e 4tiri Fo" wr a 'Rent! . >1''g. ::S'

TONIGHT: Comedy ('hIb opens
their season in the Lydia Mendels-
sohin Theatre with a prc-went atiou1
of Sem Benelli's senitio al dram i
of mediaeval Florence.
The English Singers of Loudon
appear in hill Auditorium ini the
third concert of the Choral Union
Series, beginning promptly at 8:15.

! b 6 l . .4 f4

The c,cning of
a ncT ~branh
stoc at 1 1138S.
U 11versi t3T

are Ic ft in A-n I rbr
t.M

Telephone 492d5
MANAGING EDITOR
ELLIS B. MERRY

Editor.................... George C. til~cy
City Editor.........Pierce Rosenberg
N~ews Editor........... George E. Simnons
Sports Editor......... Idward L. Warner, Jr.
'Womens Editor.......... Marjorie Fuollmer
Telegraph EEditor ..........Cassami A. Wilson
AMusic and Dramia........ William J. Gorman
Literary Editor......Lawreace R. Klein
Assistant City Editor...... Robert J. Feldmian

Night
Frank E. Cooper
William C. (sentry
Charles R. Raufman
Gurney Williams

Editors
llei'ry J. Mferry
Robert l,, Sloss
Walter XW. Wilds

Reporters
Bertram Askwith Lester May
~'elen Barce itavid M1. Niehol
M~axwell Bauer Wvilliam P'age
Mary L. Behy nier lloward 11. Peckhamx
Beniamin 11. BercutsorilIugh lPierce
Allan Ii. Berkman Victor Rabiniowitz
S. Beach Conger bun 0 1. lteiiidel
Thomas 'M. Cooley Jeannie Roberts
J ohn 11. idener Joseph A. Russell
elen Domnec ioseph Rilwit cl
:Margaret Eckels WVill iamI'. .'Saliarulo
Katharine iFerrn Cha brles R. prowlI
Carl S. Forsythe s. Cadcl eli Swvanson
Sheldon C. Fullerton j ane. ''hay er
iRuth Geddes IMlargaretI 'Ibonpsou
Ginevra Ginni Ri''lai'd L. 'IPobin
~,ack Goldsmith Elizabeth' Vlenti'ie
Morris Grot'erniaii I ai old (). Warrent, Jr.
R~oss Gustiu Charles While
Margaret iBarris G3. Lionel XWilleits
D~avid B. Hlemp'stead John EK Willoughby
J.Cullen Kcnnedy, NathiauiWise
cean Levy Barbara Wright
Russell E. McCracken Vivian Ziniit
Dorothy Magce
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
A. J. JORD)AN, JR.
Assistant Manager
ALEX K. SCHERER
Department Managers1
Advertising .......... ,. ..Hllister Niabley
Advertising .... ........ sper 11. 1 lalvcrsou
~Advertising .. ............ lierv oud A. LUpit on
Service....................George A. Soater
Circulation ..................1. \'einor D av is
Accounts........... .jo uii1. Rose
Publications .. .............. Gergelilanilttn'
Asistants
B riie M. lBadenocht Marvin Kobacker
J~ames E. Cartwright L~a A recce Lw ey j
Robert Crawford 'Ilionias Muir
Harry B. Culver I eoige Patter son
Thomas M. Davis Charles Sanford
Norman Eliezer I .ee Slay ton
amnes Hoffer Ioseph Vaii Riper
orris Johnsoni Robert Willianmson
Charles kline Wtillium IIR. Win'boys I
Buisiiness Secretwa:Y--M~ ary Chase
Laura (Codlinog Afire I1 'u il ly
Agnes Davis ' lt is Miller
Bernice Glaser 17 tlr'n E.i'd uSSelwlite
ilortense Good ing ELcatnor XV ;lk i shaw I
t)uorotliea Watteriiaia
Night Editor-ROBERT L. SLOSS
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1929

year. ;Eighteen-day tour of France, if you "ANIMAL C11ACKERS 1{FOB
This system has functioned well buy a berth from Paris to Nice, 4TII'ANKSGIVTNG
in the publications. In fact, no if you crave Montmartre; neither Mr. Sam H. Harris presents the
other plan would be at all practical1 Sam Chamberlain's intinerant tale , four Marx brothers i4 "Anima<ll
in view of the nature of the organ-
ization, which we do not considerI nor this review arc meant for you. Crackers" the week of Thanksgiv-d
substantially different in structureI But if there is a lure of the back ing-which should be a pleasant
from that of the Union. streets of Paris and the byways of anoneety temn ek
Prvne hc cal ou o' ending students. This show ha,.
INOM AX-DUTOPdroenfocetwhtoh itainsyour kint, the usual expert staging of a large
INCMETA RDUTIN idae orettopackitiyork. I working chorus in the gorgeous en-'
Reduction of the federal income j For our vagabond sketcher has got- sembles for dazzling the eyes: bt
tax will b^ a matter proposed to1 ten~ his soul into moth his mrediums added to it the services of thowe
Congress a the cmn session, i n rmtetocmsasneo famous clowns of stage and screen,,
va er adm ntration. the taore- carefree joy of life. His etchingsi and an unusually expert comypar'.yf
ver dminstrtion Th taxre-of comedians, singers, anc dca n_, ;
liefwillconist f acut of one peri and pencil renderings alone make it The book is-by George Kaufxman,
cent from the present rates on all! a thing to covet; but with all the who has admirably suited the sit-
charm of line reels a spritely pat- atosothsylofteMr
incomes. hizst h syeo teMr
This proposal, administrationteofaieyHepcdupac -i Brothers' talent. Groucho appeasi
spoksme say isa futhe reiiterino' Fiat and draped himself inl as an African explorer, who is the
spokemenaltsayioafutherselefl a French shirt and corduroys. WhatE lion and guest of honor at the'
fomifedeataatdingcloeyCoo- more could an intinenant artist luncheon. Zeppo is his assistant;
loigtaiaedrn h o ask? Normandy, Brittany, Prov- Happpasa apoeso En
lidge regime. Astute students of 1 Harpotheppiviera, BurgundyorAl-
politics and economics who dote onl Chico as the leader of the orchestra
analyzing Republican acts'for their sae e , and :finially, when hie was } furnishing the music for tthe enter-'
influence on the prosperity of the !about to leave, an exhaustive tourf tainimemt.
of the ' almost sketch-exhausted :.:
country are of the opinion that the I pai'is. Whatever is different in ap-" ,
anoneeti's dsgnDOiel.; -NNA ESSELSTYN S PIANO
ano iuceen adeignedchsiessyproach or comparatively virgin in RECITALI
to~~~~~~~ stmltIh ato' u es the way of sketch angles findsI
conrervivnoessthtsw the lr-1Caberlain,"peering pencil-push- Reviewed by Herbert Sehw artzI
coneryvoteeel o thset thc~en," perchedl on his tottering stool Miss Esseistyn is a not too cxcii.-
marketycollapses.es fth okbefor e it. n ,able young lady who displays lh.r
Forrhis rtotherpiss. I poisie now and again by her sell'-
Ifth anoncmet asbeenIoFdoubist. Theeinly question Iindulged retards and acceleraztion~s.
made merely as a stimulant for fo rhtcuean.tue es For the most pant they are not~ of-
its immediate results, the action of i 1oc fdtildsrmnto fensive-so one lets them pass :~
i the administration should be cc ncoceo ealwol c imi front ranks wouldiplace Bhim one lets pass the harmless playful-
sured. There is, also, the possiil- ti(' Msemdiseeni teofi a child. If there are no,
ity that the Republican leaders are I lig.~~ofntbyu I profound revelations of nett ical
but choseuto make theoancourse impossi-
sincere. btchs omaetein 11c nro"ril la ,nnov o;lien meaning, neither are thter nyr

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your

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shoerare made.
an ull M

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8 ux i 1(1r z2 set back
from the street, is beaul-
tifully landscaped and
there is Plenty of sun1-
shine and air oti all
;;sles. Elevator se-vice.
Rental mrasonzabke.

BROOKS~NW~r T"4

'F 1ort-st Avonue
tt13 S. Universiit y Ave ittc

Brooks ;kg

"41 F.Lbrt
I{v f ver, u i ii l C l
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nouncement at a time when
would have the greatest effect
the commercial psychology of t.
country. Such is a time-approv
practice of political parties. Ho,
ever, the good faith of the flooN
administration in proposing' the t
reduction is hardly subject to
tack. It is highly probable that
sincere effort, at least, will be ma
to have the proposal enacted.
i 0

it which is his characteristic. The' painful transgressions and on~e
lefeelitig of knowledge underlies ev- alystnkufo ht. Asi
tey ickehsbuligar too rarely the case with young laolyi
ve tuee;no aprfcae pianists) the music is allow ed to
ou)oidtwndteevsv1~il speak for itself--which is ,adequraka
veou dimenidn.ity enctl eeis the ,when the audience does not know.:
tax zexso Ipeclteeith! the music. Apparently that waIs
at ease shown which masks the tra- ;the case last night for there was iso r.a
.ail fat ep uesaeadmuch evidence, of enjoyment. Andc
1d play of light fcan onlysbe s hown s schpayngisi"ases, s_
thr~oughi a long period of prepara-j tifzed, andth fairly thooug
tory study. And silhouetting of tann of moderate talent bears
m xassed detail against sunlit plane ii futIt seems wasteful, thougxh,

"" {vii1C .
,i "EI Pi r. e"n4 A 4 ~"- M p
1"
F PtEI... :y: SQd BARMAN 579 w
$ CiE CAa '
:wx
%Olt A NAt 'I C4Tk$ERT KE}
SIC. 1101i Jll xu x

F lorMan
Nellie Carson
Lillian Berger

Cuthb l-Kelly
Nori-a i Nodeyr

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CO A UNONSERIES,
1-IIL .,AUJTRi, IJI :1I5

Campus Opinion
Contributors~ are ask~ed to tie brie.
confining themiselves to lcs.; tian 30o
".'ord? it possibile. Anonywoils comf-
mniicat;oiis will he disregarded, The
names of ceiniun jealt s will, however,
be regar'd ed as conidenitialI, iupon re-
(luest. iLeters published, sbouhl mt lhr
construed as expressing the editorial
opinion of the Daily.
MORE, ANENT SEA'TS

is also not the w ork of inspiration
but. of effort. That is the chief
fault of Chamberlain's wor'k, and
one for which only his training can
be blamed. Trhe rendering and the!
technique are excellent, the atmos-
phere easily distinguished; but de-'
spite the crispne;,s of line and form
there is a lack of emotion other
than lively interest.!
The text is a happy foil; there

that these people whose initontions
apapear so praiseworthy do not pci'-
form more extenasively the vLat
body of chamber music so appro-
Spriately available to their aboilities.
Surely this music might most use-'
fully be brought out of its modles;
hiding. Those who are not ac-
quaintedl with the more usually
played piano compositions will also
enoy the trios and quarte'ts when

A limlited number of seasonl
able at $6.00,1$8.00, $,10.00 and
dcrts at $1X.50, $ 2.00 and $2.50.
Mu!tsic,IMay,,a cl street.

ticks s Ave still avail-
12.00. Sin le Con-
On safe ,it School of

I I ' 'I I I

MERIT OR POLITICS?
Party machinery, high pressure
salesmanship, and suavity always
have and always will be the key-l
note to success in the peanut pol-
itics which. now prevail on thel
Michigan campus. Any candidate,
regardless of his qualifications, can
mnanage to carry an election if he
but gain the backing of the party I"
in power. Comparative merit rare-s
ly if ever enters into the considera-j
tion of these candidates by' the
campus at large. Y
There are certain organizations--,
notably the Union-whichi we feel
should be removed from the polit-
ical vagaries of a student body in-=3
capable of judging the respective
worth of the candidates. 'Tie vot-
ers (particularly in an all-campus l
election) lack the knowledge which'
is requisite for selecting the man
who will 1111 his position efficiently
and creditably, because they knowE
none of the inner workings of theI
orga.nization in question.'
The only means of surmzounting ;'
this obstacle, we believe, is to place,
the election of Union officers in the
dands of persons well acquainted'.
with the existing conditions, men
who have been actively interested
in the welfare of the Union and
who are qualified to judge the stu-
dents handling its business.
Th'is proposal is not a new onle.'
The merit system was brought up
five years ago and defeated for po-
litical reasons; two years ago when,
lack of the necessary 600 voters pre-
vented its adoption; and last year;
when the presence of a heckler
moulded lack of conviction into op-
position.
The exact m~emibership of the I
election board; its faculty-student
proportion; its proximity to the
president of the Union and the
time o~f its inauguration furnish the
principal snags in p~ractical con-
sideration of the plan./ But at the
most, they are details 'upon which,
a reasonable agreement may be
reached. If we get a system which
encourages good men to try out fory

'To the editor: 1i tha .sntontaneitv """-; " ~ -.-;-
The recent statement of the Ath1- iaboutontasentenbo- I they hear them forthe fasI~Lit, n.
letic Management, released for pub- es, a vivid colorful manner of de- those (and they should be consid-
lication in defense of the board's j scription, and above all a sense of ered a little) who know these piano j
student seating policy was .such a humor. We are tired of ponderous works so that only the interpr'eta-
pitiful affair that it is doubtful if guide books, of solemn adventurers;! tions of a creative musician can
it nlihteed nyne n te cm-after all globe trotting is a young1 make their performan~e vwor Ch-
in. an's pastime. If he doesn't gun-{ while most assuredly appreciate
The satemnt scupulusly re-le occasionally he is deficient and the opportunity of hearing more
frained from a definition of the oft I shudnt rt.Chmelcnhsh-amber music, the nature of
used~~~~~~~ phae1uiest uss all that exuberance without being1 which is such that it more urgently
which enlightenment has been long ic edosntstanfr't i requires performance.
anticipated by the student body.{ thli.Eahewsefns This argument also hold'; ifor he
Thebelef hat"gust ofthepla- lzThe tgerse zadjective -laden sen- performance of new composit ins.
agement" oud be more approepos I 1 The silly tradition of incuding
of the pawould trthrwie- ences are at times poor rhetoric. B ach, Beethoven and Chopin -and;
prac oe te isa m'athe.XV id -Ic never loses the sketchy episodic iLiszt or its equivalent onl cve'Y
spreadone onthe capus. O ee limng of a disjointed chronicle ii o''mi hlyl~~s id
wonersinvai eacty hw lU~ V(which accounts for much of its P P
thousands thme universit , guests ag I Let those who feel that they('a
gregate per game. One wondeiti cones achasdvntureis ae s throw n-ew lights on these comprto'>
further why the students 8as peiiUIt-- tesadpssdb.Hi i-ers lperfornm their wor'ks, a i(! lSo)
aneint guests of the institution w~tit l daii'i of the Cook's tourist is open- those who thinK that thle Intl wi
seats all 1ad ortoinadane1? i traded, and the very deep ap- ifolo'i'I''t. be sufficiently fresh to therl)t'irl-
of the printing of the tickets should 1 cno ison xerec ticular audiences. But, as has br en
not be rated at least on even termzis throws it into relief. Despite the imnpliedl, we have a mixc d aitienre
with the mysterious thiousands , f journalistic tr'eatmnent it is good to consider here.
"universityry ruaot to beririud.(The trouble is that all per fori I'es
But what most gripes thme ,Au- i W aeeer esntob ru feel that they have a message
dentis te prfernce hich !f -i' our Sam Chamberlain. He is an
dentis he refrene whch en-I . . .or at any rate that, they want: to
eral applications rcieoe ~ artist and wrtes like an artist; too _ t ,ci i ?l
detapplicatio.ns. ~c1iI ooexplain imuptient to wait for smnoothlong deltriveronhe n he- snooe
dent ~~i utences to formn. He sketches in esrinthm
tion is vuchsafed.,Ththeeoszviis l ;
It will be noted that all credit fr the impressiomi ansd' leaves us with Thtteeoerain I''Ci
a etr,{efwsson1~ zha i ,wthe present location of studednt a ,etu'eIrectewas'shown last nighat. o'!,in tme

tions is generiously ivell to Chei
student council which or'igiimai.iy
made the selection. By what re-
narkable combination of ci rcu n-
stance was this 'tudteimt counIcil per-!
numtted or forced to choose seiatig
blocks for the student, body for
ten years to coimie? And what man-
ner of men were the students who
comprised thiis student ooocii ancd
submitted to the plan in (b~e lest
place?
It is i ndeed a sorry IIIUss whena
the student body of a gi'e~at univvi'-
sity like Michigan nmt organizej
to secure a fundamental right, On
their owni campus. andve right a conl-I
dition of such w'etclle disc;Utht it
-may not be dupliesated oin aniother'
campus in the countr'y. But tap-
parenztly this very thing must be
done if the objective is to be sic-I
coniplislied and the students are toa
be permitted to sec their f'ootball
team next yearwaid in litct hevar-s to

w last group (with tHe extcelton o01
-lAi_ ER S AN'NOUNCE NEW i that lmeanlingless tgibbei'li H' Al-(
SEIE 'kan-McDow el]-Prpetual l (Moc
wvas infinitely more in'ttrestim lwhn
harpers & Comipany have niow i the Chopin Group anvd tim" 5,~ci'C ,
comleted platis for a flew senics! movenment of the Beethoven. iV mu
jt onmodlern European history for norn Sonata wlinch was all of, tic '
thec layinan a )d college student to!!lfist group thae write,' heardo. 'lilt'
})' entitled TI:he Rise of Modern mi usic was uafintlllar :'d
Euroepe. It will be published inIi fore self-suIilc int. It wasaI n1m
twenty illustr'ated1 volumes under experience alnotf0r thal i i o'a51o
lie editorship of Frofessor Williadm, td d-ot rcuire a3 finish b ,t ed l)orl~i
L. Langer o~f Harvard University. ! lice. All th e short coinlgs of tI he
i ice lm contribu tors will be Chopin* playing--absence of aany,
dlrawli exclusively from th e ranks ( compretiensive conciC) ion, t' I mimi-
of American hiistorians, the new cal insecurity, lacl, of convicuiol' -
:sre will, ini a sense, be a pioneer and rhlythmaiical lapses were' inai-
of efort, and it is hoped, a miolnument ; ticed (if they were pI'esent) boiircilatrelshlrhi.iiilepsr it o ecas
Par-ticuiar emphasis will be given than a respectable appoinaio Jlitl
to the influence of the Unitedl of ihe score; indeed mtore eon 11 I
States on the course of European hardly be grasped. 1-1cm-c is a mimmcre
histor'y antd to the effect of for- ' lucrative (to the perIfoi il') t' i-
I eigim Policies onl this country. centive for playing uls lets:'fl';nli;'1'r
I Amonig those who have so far works, both old anld ne. hel vil v

' o 'le co iquest ofthecuar
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j' %'c; sea' l ~nel. il cmj' radciho emaltiee
,\?-ti'5 h pilot of his actual dsance above
,; "unVJ or water by flashinig gree, yellow, and
n:I~ () lT; ntheistuetoa.

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