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November 06, 1929 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-11-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TH-E MTeHIG

-~I LY

NEW CAMP DAVIS HAS PICTURESQUE SITE IN WY(

)MING

UIVRSITY AATS NEW SURVEYING CAMP SITUATED
IN HEART OF MOUNTAIN REGION MGH '
12[CE OAION'- TO 0151
TOEE A
-IN G i r -I N

Climate and Scenery Considered3
Among Best to be Found
in the Country.
NEAR NATIONAL PARKS
Camp Open to Limited Number'
of Students from Other
Universities.

Ann Arbor
Spons
Ye,
EXHIBITSI
Exhibition to
Gallery
Men

O'T|T BLOODY BATTLES FEATURED GAMES T O TrTl
O RTT es OF GENERATION AGO, SAYS ALUMNUSdl] TO 1111
With activities between the class- the Student council and he shall
PL9 W R ies of 1932 and 1933 very near at! have complete charge of the rush. - f1 0 g T [
hand, reminiscent thoughts of the The importance of the latter rule
fall games of years gone by are was hardly over-emphasized. In
AL tvE Tcreeping out on Michigan's campus. previous years a student was cho- Iowa Congressman Will Appear
An old grad mentioned the fact, sen, and sometimes his opinion and
the other day. that back in 1908 and decisions were rather biased. in Grand Jury Inquiry
there was the necessity of rule- The result was a good free-for-all in Washington.
Art Association Will making following one of the blood- with much spilt blood. The addi-
sor Seventh ier inter-class battles. The new tional ten minutes and the added jWET' DINNER DISCUSSED
arl Show. rules adopted were as follows: height of the pole were also con-
1. The rush shall be against a de- sidered great assets toward attain-
fended flag pole, thirty feet in ing a more heated, and yet a clean-
DUE SATURDAY height and greased, with the fresh- er contest in the days of 1908. WASHINGTON, Nov. .5.-An
men defending. If anyone remembers "Dad" elaboration of his previously recit-
) be Held in West 2. The use of ladders, sharp in- Skinner and his contributions to ed tale of a "wet" dinner attended
. struments of any kind, or climbing the class day rushes in the way of I by numerous members of congress,
of Alumni paraphenalia is prohibited.- supplying the official flag, the fo- some observations on "Washing-
norial Hall. 3. The rush will begin prompt- lowing excerpt will be of interest: ton's social lobby," and a discussion
ly at 7:30 o'clock in the evening. I "Dad" Skinner has agreed to make of "prohibition enforcement 'in

The new location of Camp Davis, where the civil engineers will,

Camp Davis which is sponsore
by the College of Engineering of
the University as a camp for fiel
work in surveying was move(
last summer to Jackson's Hole
Wyoming. The old site in north-
ern Michigan had not met the re-
quirements due to the exorbitant
undergrowth, and infringing right:
of the Biology camp located nea
there.
The new location is in the val-
ley of the' Hoback river, twenty
miles south of Jackson, and seven-
ty-five miles"south of Yellowston(
Park. The camp includes one hun-'
dred twenty acres of land, and an
almost unlimited area of federa?
forest reserves is available foi
field. work in surveying. The eleva-
tion of the camp site is 6113 feet
above sea level, according tc
Pyof. Clarence T. Johnston of the
lngineering college, whq had
charge of the camp last summer

pend their summers surveying, is shown above. The scenery and Featuring the work of local art- 4. The sophomores will have 30 the banner and will donate it to general and Wall Street booze par-
climate of this part of Wyomg is considered among the best of the ists, the seventh annual exhibition minutes in which to gain posses- the Freshman class. He promises ties in particular were promised
country.___of the Ann Arbor Art association sion of the flag, or the freshmen to make a better flag with more an expectant senate today by
n--a-un 'uwill be held from Nov. 14 to 29 in will be declared the winners harmonious colors than ever be- Smith W. Brookheart, Republican
piled by Professor Johnston the new west galleryofAlumnifreof I .
Wild Animals in Locality. r rMemorial hall, says an announce- Another side-light on the rushes Wednesday, the Iowan will go be-
ment recently sent out to more of 20 years ago is an account in an fore a grand jury which is inves-
tending the campma stueetsto',S rM 8 Srt
tendingItheIcampmarsuenesGatithan 400 members of the society. UIIf 11issue of The Daily for October 8, tigating liquor conditions in Wash-
ani-e e ampoaysild -The exhibition, which is open to U1908, in which the massed sopho- ington to lay before it muchlAhe
ampleUhnd ln k r oall local artists, whether or not they Ifmore class ducked all freshmen dis- same information, particularly with
bear, and buffalo. They may climb are members of the association, covered about the streets on "Black respect to the dinner, with an'ac-
he nearby mutains ad lar Problems of Countries on Pacific aims to represent the best original F e rafnighthe "Habubarres in cae neary twooh he srtled then-
h' td -.work in the graphic plastic, ana ! the rarofte"amugrsop Iaena w otsao
sotething of the wonders of the Ocean to be Discussed p and on State street Several gang fights Meanwhile members of the sen-
great Teton Range. They are able decorative arts produced in the German Will Extent Tests Aim Sensent.eSeveray gatts
to inspect many fine examples of by Delegates. community. AtT ti sensued and thte bloody battles last-i ate were still talking of a stae-
engineering design and construc- -- The announcement stipulates ing to Treat Ailments by ed until late Saturday morning. menat from Senator Gillet, Repb-
ion, and then can travel over roads HELD AT KYOTO, JAPAN that all exhibits must be submit- Direct Injection. Several small parties of freshmen lican, Massachusetts, who ser eas
that illustrate the necessity for _ted to the office of Prof. B. M. Don- were 'g cky to dodge the class of speaker of the house forpireee
careful location su'veys. The camp The third conference of the In- aldson, first vice-president of the BERLIN, Nov. 5--Dr. Werner 19'ee doznenposters, put u two orwas terms, that he had tostheeirdree
mae oaition salurry.Tefor ;Te hrdnfrnen-osituthe In-.'soiti omBo lmiM-e oe otrbtti aitatives attending toherd e
maintains a small library for gen stitute of Pacific Relations is in society, in room B of Alumni Me- Forssmann, a 25-year-old surge.-. about the extent of retaliation from while "under the influen ,of
era reading, and during the past esmorial hall between 9 and 5 on has succeeded in propelling a rub- I the yearlings. liquor." This remark came in the
summer students laid out a ball session now at Kyoto, Japan. The Friday, Nov. 8, and between 9 and ber catheter through a vein in his of the debate on the Bing-
diamond and horseshoe court. confererge is made up of delegates 12 on Saturday, Nov. 9. Here a com- left arm to the right auricle of his The clas of 1912, however, Won m course of ete th Bhg
One of the remarkable features from each of the countries on the mittee will consider and select heart. found the new 30 feet of greased statement that if congress attempt-
about the camp is the scarcity of Pacific ocean including Great Brit- "only such works as are present- Applying a local anesthetic only, pole much too high to scale within ed to condemn all the indiscretions
insect pests, with the exception of ain. Material and data of exhaus- able for exhibition purposes." Dr. Forssmann inserted a highly the thirty minutes allowed them, of its members, it would have little
horse flies which are active dur- tive researches have been submit- Realizing the need for an organi- I sterilized and well lubricated rub- The Daily says there was much time to devote to its regular duties.
during the warm hours of the day ted to the conference and are un- zation of artists and others inter- i ber catheter, 65 centimeters (about "unnecessary roughness" at the He said the intoxication of the
for about four weeks. There are no der discussion at the present time: ested in the art field with the puT-- 2 feet 1 1-2 inches) long, into the tilt, which halted the battle several house members to which he had re-
mosqitos or house flies and no these researches are concerned pose of conducting exhibitions and vein directly above the left elbow. times to permit those injured to be ferred was obvious to those present,
poisonous snakes. A well-equipped with the problems and inter-rela- of bringing men prominent in the Carefully manipulating it upward carried to shelter. They meant although unknown "to the g at
hospital at Jackson is ready to tionships of the countries border- world of art to lecture in Ann Ar- and under the collarbone he suc- what they said in 1908. American public."
care for those who may require ing the Pacific Ocean bor, Emil Lorch, professor of archi- ceeded in locating the stump artery -
trea.tment however. accidents and-I tecture, Prof. H. P. Thieme, of the through which he passed the cath- *

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Camp Davis is situated at the
nmouth of the beautiful and ro-
mantic Hoback Canyon of Wy-
oming, amidst towering moun-
tains. Three to four miles east
of the camp the rugged moun-
tains are to be seen with their
lower slopes decorated with
groves of aspen. Their summits
extend from 9400 to 9800 feet
above sea level, and looking
down from their peaks the Ho-
back River can be seen extend-
ing for miles like a tiny stream
of silver lace. Within a thou-
sand feet of the river are nu-
merous little while buildings
which mark the site of Camp
Davis.
The climate and scenery pis the best
to be found in the country.
Fourteen Buildings Erected.
During the summer fourteen res-
idence buildings were erected, and
others will be built next year. Alsc
a kitchen, keeper's house, dining
room, instrument room, shop, and
garage were built. The construc-'
tion program for the future will be
limited largely to residence build-
ings, 14 feet square.' All of the
buildings are of sheet steel with
concrete floors. The camp has a
gravity water supply, from a small
mountain stream south of the camp
site, and water is distributed
throughout the camp.
During the summer all of the
studentsvisited Yellowstone Na-
tional Park, the great slide on the
rors, Ventre River, and the beauti-
f lake country along the base of
the Teton mountains.
People in the United States
spend large sums of Moneyeach
year to live at the "due" ranches
which are operated in Jackson's
Hole, and the opportunity to live
for a summer in this country is
made possible for students for
$200, according to a report corm-

L 1 Z t 1 1 1 k , 1 u c c , a , I U . u T e p r o e o h n t t t f ;ca s e s o f i l l n e s s w e r e v e r y r a r e .P c f c R l t o s i oR m n e L n u a e d p r m n , e e n o h s h a t
case ofillesswer vey rre Th pupos oftheInsitue 0 Romance Language department, Ieter into his heart.
during the summer. Pacific Relations is to gather facts 'and Theodore W. Kochs, then li- The course and location of the
n i Pconcerning conditions prevalent in brarian of the university, organiz- robe were carefully registered by
University Pioneered Field Work. the Far East, for example, and in ed the he n rsAtyso i
I ted hev nArbrint s1908.on; ensedDf rsa nnpartouservcT
The University was the pioneer in round table procedure thrash out in 1908. ens of X-r a t which he Prof's voic
the establishment and mainten- the difficulties arising both pro and Tinalerorssosex-
ance of a camp for field work in con. Although no definite conclu- The first exhibition of that or-nminuately the progress of his exe
s The camp was first or- j sions are reached and no action is ganization, which numbered at periment. .It lasted less than a min-
ganizedin 1874 under the super- taken, nevertheless the cause is that time 600 members, was held ute and produced no ill effects on ( re
gaie1n17 ne h ue-tkn eeteestecuei that year in the auditorium of thej him. y our fortifiedr
vision of the late Prof. J. B. Davis. highly important in that it brings Ann Arbor High school, Alumni D.
The University does not proposc to light several of the bones of con- Mm or h thn Aing Dr. Forssmann is an assistant Of S H RED D E D W
to make the camp available only to 'tention that exist between the ehggusty Victoria
Michigan students. It is hoped 1 countries. In a previous conference. pleted. Hospital, where the experiment was that imparts pe
that the new camp wiay be cos-, for instance,, Japan showed openly?1 At the next exhibition, held the carried out in the presence of his
mopolitan,nand in order tocarry its resentment against the action 'next year in connection with the professional colleaguesand nurses.%mind focus on
this out the University is limiting of the United States barring Ori- opening of Alumni M1emorial hall, The young surgeon says he now
the number of students coming entals. At present there is much ill- the late Charles Frayer, of Detroit, proposes to investigate the prac- hand.
from each institution. feeling among the Chinese against displayed his collection of Chinese tical possibilities of treating heart
. othe "imperialism" of foreign na- screens. He also defrayed 'all other ailiments by injecting drugs
The basic purpos'e of the new tions in assuming extraterritorial expenses of the exhibition. through the medium of the cathe-
camp is to provide advanced in- rights in China. It is certain that Since that time the art associa- ter propelled through the veins di-
struction in surveying under the the United States would make ref- tion has conducted a number of rectly into the heart.
most favorable conditions and to erence to some of these discussions exhibitions each year where paint-
give the students who avail them- in the event that immediate infor- ings, both oil and water-color, SPAIN POSTPONES ASSEMBLY.
see of the ot arkable mation would be needed to settle etchings, and lithographs are
to see one of the most remarkable some such foreign dispute. shown. (By Associated Press)
regions in the world- MADRID, Nov. 4.-After a meet-
i P nn~ Cf Fin~ c MARDRo.4-fe e

e won't
nowhere when
with a breakfast
WHEAT, the food
p and lets your
the subject in

I

rro. . . .nemer or Economics
State College Oficial department of Michigan has al-4
.e d tready submitted to the conference:
I1jred in Auto CraSh the results of his study on the!
American financial investment in
(fly Associated Press China. In corroboration 'with himi
BUFFALO, N. Y., Nov. 4.-MissI and under his general supervision,
Ailda Yakely, 45 years old, registrar England, France, and Japan have
of Michigan State college, was also contributed similar studies;
struck by an automobile late today these studies will come under the
and critically injured. Her skull regular business of the conference.
is reported to be fractured and she
also has three fractured ribs and!
1111 South University
numerous bruises.
She came here to attend a conICHIGAN
ference 'of the officers of the Amer-.M C IA
ican Associated Collegiate Regis- Pennants, Jewelry,
trars at the University of Buffalo. as

SZECHOSLOVAKIA OBTAINS
LEASE FOR SEAS OUTLET
HAMBURG, Germany, Nov. 4.
Czechoslovakia land-locked state,
today secured an outlet to the sea
by' concluding an agreement with
the Hamburg senate for the lease
of certain sections of the harbor I
here for 99 years.

ing of the cabinet today it was an-
nounced that the meeting of the
national assembly had been post-
poned until January 15.

k TV LJLwV

All the bran of the whole wheat

I

a

s

One Half Block East of Campus
BANNERS
and Memory Books
1 Stationery

_________________________-______

r

__ ,i

Michigan ea

._4L
* ?' o

EBERBACH & SON CO.
ESTABLISHED 1843

;. , !!
. ''"'..
i :*." t
, y i S't'1Z:
:;?;;.
..3p.f;. i:: ." z

j%'

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SCIENTIFIC
LABORATORY SUPPLIES

I

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200.202 E. LIBERTY ST.

r .

..r--

I

A. REAU'S SERVICE CAR
$25.00 f o I1a y "FIXALt"
lost Key I Can'.I h same low ratepasr
Replace. Shop.. Open 7 A. M. to 9
P. M.
2!5 OO REWARD
For any article worth repairing that I can't repair and make as strong
or stronger than new.
Free repair for any item that I can't name its occupation.
I want the repair work that others turn down. One trial will win

CORNWELL COAL - COKE
m.
Scranton, Pocahontas
Kentucky and West Virginia Coal
Solvay and Gas Coke
This business has been growing ever,
since it was established. The secret-
giving absolute satisfaction to our
customers." We believe it pays to do
business in a friendly way. If you
think so too,1lets get together.

OF COURSE IT'S NO
FAIR PLAYING THE.
PROCTOR AND SPYING
OUT SUCH A DELICATE
SITUATION AS THIS.
BUT TH EN, WE'RE
NO PROCTOR.
A ND W E CA N
RESIST ANYTHING
BUT TEMPTATION. I

y S

cc
del
of r
a littl

All of which goes to prove (if
we maybe excused for saying so)
that the pause that refreshes is the
sanest temptation which millions
ever succumbed to. 'And to these
same millions :he pause that re-
reshes has come to mean an ice-
old Coca-Cola. Its tingling,
icious taste and cool after-sense

..... ..

eheshment have proved that
1e minute is long enough for

0

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