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November 03, 1929 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-11-03

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SUINDAY, 1NOVEM13ER 1,, 1929.

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AR MAI SERVIC
IN MICHIGAN BESTi
Overnight Out-of-State Flights
and Many Stops Are State
Air Service Features.
PACK APPROVES SERVICE
New Postal Service on Parcels
Will Speed Student Mail
to Outlying States.

Prominent Minister
of France Has Task

RUTHVEN LAUDS SELECTIVE ADMISSION SYSTEM

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Library Given Rare GRMAN PRIMARIES
Historical Volumes
More than 70 rare volumes ofAY

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Michigan has more air mail
"stops" than any other state in
the country, according to Mark E.
Nevils, division traffic manager of
the Thompson Aeronautical cor-
poration, operators of the Michigan
air mail system.
Under government contract the
company serves 13 cities in Mich-
igan alone; and the service extends
into Ohio, Indiana and Illinois.
Following the recent improvements
consideration of those about to be
made at the local airport, and in
made, the company has decided to
add Ann Arbor to the list of stops.j
This means that students with out-
of-state correspondence may de--1
pend on overnight delivery to New
York City, 24-hlour service to. the.
Pacific coast, and proportionate
speed to other cities of the coun-
try, whether they are on the air
mail lines or not.-i

not only exclude the stupid, the measure up to University ideals or
11 f teradi ote chlroai i tstfalxt i;yImmoral, and the phychopathic, leave college, the general standard
President Alexander Grant Ruthven over sta-! but also the indolent, the irre- of university work may be raised
tion WJR. __sponsibie, and the socially unad- to the great benefit of the proper-
"Earnest people have argued that justed youth. ly endowed students and to society.
since the University belgngs to the Two Methods Jpun. "In voicing tnis attitude on the
State every taxpayer may expect to "There are two methdds of select- desirability of and the justification
have his boy or girl admitted to the ing students fitted to profit by for selecting the youth who are to
University, particularly .if the youth higher education. Orne is to at- go to college one lays oneself open
is scholastically prepared This is tempt to admit only those quali- to the acccusation of advocating
one of those _halftruths, not rec- fled by innate endow:.-ents and a state institution for the favored
ognized as such and so frequently previous training to make the most few. In a sense the charge is jus-
discussed, which delights the of the opportunities provided by tified, but the fault is only an ap-
critics of our educational system. the University to develop their parent one. Since we admit differ-
SApparently logical, the argument is ability to make critical judgments ences in the natural and acquired
reduced to an absurdity when cre- andtheir competency to act upon mental qualificationsdof therace
deecisgientoth critiismtha their con 2 ;signs-in short, ony; ycraig schools and other in-
' :our graduates are untrained for those prepared to receive an edu- stitutions for the handicapped
life and in other ways fail to justi- cation. New methods are raising child, why should we not recognizeI
fy the cost of their education, the average of student performance .these variations by schools for the
'"Se lf ted by excluding many applicants for youth who has, added to an alert
our educational. . maladies usua admission who would otherwise be mind, the inspiratiqn and moral
attribute fancied or real failure to doomed to fail either to complete insight needed in the leaders in our
produce a properly trained student the undergraduate training or to society? If the University should
to our faculties, to the fact that the graduate as a worthwhile -product. adopt the alternative policy of at-
times are out of joint, and indeed I But no system of selecting pros- tempting to raise the general
usually to anything else but neglect pective studen},s that has been de- standard of culture. by admitting
Assctt a Pr I Photo to restrict admission and failure vised has been found to be infal- the maximum number of high
Etienne Clementel to eliminate the ill-equipped stu- ! lible. school students the result would be
Former finane inister who dent. That the end-product of any "The second method is to elimi- level of mediocrity and a sacrific-
manufacturing process depends to nate the unfit as t.aey appear after a lowering of standards to the dull
d a considerable extent upon the matriculation. Here again one can- ing of the best interests of the
new French cabinet. quality of the materials used is a not be sure of perfect results from gifted student.
truism succinctly summed up in the the procedures in vogue, but if it Should Set High Standard.
adage that 'One cannot make a is clearly kept on mind and rigidly "The best interests of education
S RE ENpurse out of a sow's ar' This ob adhered to in practice, that, since in Michigan will be served if the
vious conclusion applies 'to educa- it is not the business of the Uni- University is considered a detached
REFLECTIONS tonal rc as el as to in- versity to reform the refractory educational unit designed to admit
dustrial operations. I boy or girl the student must either and to train only those of our
youth who have the habitudes for
Melodrama Expe~rs Must Select Material. higher learning; its standards to*
"Madame X', the current fea- : "Only, as a.,group do the citizens OVerning Board for be set and carefully maintained by
ture at the Majestic, displays a of a. state own their institutions. Conference Proposed jthe faculty, without interference,
touch of dramatic keenness and The paying of taxes does not imply - - and its students selected by the
appreciation sorely needed by the individual ownership of state in- (By Associated .'ress) several schools and colleges and
talking screen. And it may be pro- stitutions,. but it is rather to be CHICAGO, Nov. 2.-A general solely on the basis of innate qual-
perly attributed to the unseen pres- compared with the payment of pre- governing body, designed to regu- fications nd training."
ence, curiously enough, of a Barry- miums in a mutual company to be late the conduct of college athletes
more behind the cameras rather operated under the direction of off the athletic field, was proposed
than before them. experts constituting the staff. The today by Major John L. Griffith, A. A. U. Will Consider'
Director Lionel Barrymore has claim that the University should ad- Athletic Commissioner of the West- 'Sm s n . Cla1m
lost none of the dramatic intensi- mit any but'well qualified students ern conference. ImpSOi RC;rC ill
ty. of Willard Mack's stage hit in is as unsound. as would be the Major Griffith said such a board-
transforming it to the Vitaphone opinion that the state-supported if given proper authority should. (B Assoiated Press>
medium. Further, he has so in- jail, hospital or asylum should in- be able to decide how much assis- NEW YORK, Nov. 2.-The claims
spired the cast that every role is carcerate any citizen upon his re- tance should be given the athlete! of George Simpson, Ohio State'
lyefaultlessly by an amazingly quest. If the people ofuMichigan in return for the time he spends in University
~ompeent roup f acors.wish their colleges to succeed in, athletics. Uiest prnet eonto
The story is one of a wife,_mom-rduc'ngt prdu rwh- as the "world's fastest human,"
~ntril unaitfu towif, mm-producing the product for which____________'ste"olsfaethu n
entarily unfaithful to her cold- they are designed, they must per-; The oldest microscope on record will be considered at the Amateur
blooded husband, who runs away mit thei experts,.to. select the raw i is a plano-convex lens of quartz Athletic Union's annual meeting in
ith another man and then pen- materials, and the selection should ound amid the ruins of Ninevah. St. Louis, November 17, 18 and 19.
itently returns on discovering her

economic history published dur-
ing the century 1660-1760 have rc-;
conLly been acquired by the Wil-
liam L. Clements library, it is an-
nounced
These books provide material
for studying the economic cause of
the American Revolution. The re-h
volt of the colonies is laid to the
continued picctice of Parliament
enforcing a protective tariff on the
British Empire. In speaking of the'
rooks ibrnrian fR. G. Adanami > rc-
marked, "They are of pecull""r in-
terest today because of the anzal-
ogy they bear to the present discas-
:cns of th, United States tariff."

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(1)y A sso \',,oa 1ed P lres"')
' BERLIN, Nov. 2.-'oung -plan
plebiscite registrations i distiricts
recorded up to today reach~ed - a
total of 10.16 per cent of the voting
strength, or .16 per pent in excess
of the number required to h ave,the
reichstag consider a bill to refer
the Young 'Plan and otler peace
* treaty matters to a vote ef the Ger-
man people. Some ret arns were
still oustanding.
The plebiscite has bseon sponsored
by the German Nati..nalists and the
Monarchist group, 'who have fought
bitterly the Ye ung and Dawes
plans and selections of the treaty
of Versailles.

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Postmaster A. C. Pack states thatj
7,404 of Michigan's 11,490 students'
are from outside the state and it,
is believed that the resumption of
air mail service directly to and!
from Ann Arbor will prove popular.
The service is expected to be in
operation within a week or two, ac-
oording to Mr. Nevils. GovernmentI
officials inspected the airport last
week and fourd it satisfactory butl
approbation must be received from
Washington before actual service
can begin.
According to a folder issued by
the company any parcel up to 50
pounds in weight may be sent air
mail but it must not be more than
84 inches in size which includes
both length and girth. The closing
hours for despatch will be 10:30{
o'clock in the morning for Detroit'
and Pontiac and 4:15 o'clock in the
afternoon for all parts of the
United States, Canadarand Mexi-
co. This will be a daily servi'ce with
theexception of Sundays and holi-
days.
TEACHERS LEAVE
ON LECTURE TOUR
Two members of the Latin De-;
partment have been- absent from
the University for a few days in
order to fill various lecture en-!
gagements
Prof. Jame's E. Dunlap spoke in
Kalamazoo before the Michigan
Educational Association on the;
subject "'Around the Bay of Naples'
With Virgil." In this talk Professor
Dunlay attempted to study the
Bay as described in the works of
Virgil or as he must have known
it. The address was a combination
of travel talk and literary observa-
tion wherein the influence of these
surroundings on the great poet's
wark was traced.
Prof. Benjamin D. Meritt has
been lecturing for the Archeologi-
cal Institute of America in Akron,
Springfield, and Oberlin, Ohio, and
in Toronto, Ont.
The subject of Professor Meritt's
discourse has been "An Ancient
Crossword Puzzle," During the past
few days Professor Meritt has been
considering for his audiences the
Greek Inscriptions, the method for
studying them, their construction,
evaluation and interpretation as
historical documents.
Pollock Writes Paper
for Historyaggazine
Prof. James K. Pollock, Jr., of the
political science department, is the
author of an article entitled "A
Comparison of the American and
British Party Systems", which ap-
pears in the November issue of the
Journal of the Royal Institute of
International Affairs.
Professor Pollock has written a
number of other works, including a,
widely used "Readings in American
Government," and "Party Cam-
paign Funds."

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baby boy is ill. The husband re-
Juses her even a glimpse of the
child, driving the mother to a life
of sin. Rth Chatterton gives her
best screen performance to date as
the ill-fated Madame X, and Lewis
'Stone is convincing as the hus-
band. f
An unusual climax brought many
handkerchiefs into play yesterday
afternoon. You should enjoy this
all-talking film if the usual inane
minority of rude spectators remains
half-way polite. The photography
and lighting effects are unfortu-
nately poor in several spots.
Comedy
Generally amusing, but nothing
remarkable, best sums up Richard
Dix's latest talking comedy, "The
Love Doctor," which opens at the
Michigan today. Here the star has
the role of a young doctor, appar-
ently immune to love, who gets that
way over his new nurse, a leading
lady of considerable charm and
personality.
Both players have agreeable
voices, but Dix seems to be slipping
fast as a talking star, although he
is not badly suited to his current
role. Several humorous situations1
sustain interest in "The Love Doc-
tor," but the plot is not especially
plausible.
Farce
"Sonny Boy" is a decidedly mis-
leading title for the newest Vita-
phone picture at the Wuerth.j
There's none of the old hokum
which so thoroughly saturated Da-
vey Lee's previous picture with Al
Jolson, but instead a sprightly
clever farce of the most entertain-
ing nature..
Although we saw it several
months ago, the film and compagy
are quite clear. Edward Everett
Horton, one of the ablest of talking
screen comedians, and winsome
Betty Bronson support and even
outshine Master Lee in the part of
a small boy over whose custody his
estranged parents are fighting. If
you care for good comedy, don't
miss this one.
Comedy Drama
Among the new films in Detroit
is "Big Time" at the Fox, a com-
posite of the usual back-stage ep-
ics, but played and depicted .with
a simplicity that is pleasingly en-
tertaining. Lee Tracy of legitimate
fame and Mae Clarke fill the fea-
tured leads capably.
B. J. A.

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