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October 01, 1929 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-10-01

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TUESrLEATr '- AMi~J

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PTblished every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis-
Stches credited to it or not otherwise credited
in this paper and the local news published
herein.
Entered at the posto..ce at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post
mtaster General.
Sibscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail, $4.50.
Offices: Anti Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street,
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.

point untainted by association with
recent Michigan history; greater
acquaintance w i t h outstanding
men who might be added to the
faculty; and a personality fresh
to the academic mind which might
be predjudiced against one more
intimately known.
Such presumption, of courseJ
should not be taken to mean that
the burden cannot be swung in
the favor of one already known to
the faculty and students. In the
final analysis, Michigan now needs
an acknowledged leader who can
vigorously step. off the way of pro-
gress in a material and an aca-
demic sense. That much remains
to be done in both directions, no
one can deny. In hope for such a'
selection whether from the local
field or the lists outside, our eyes
are turned with more than passing
interest upon the Regents' meet-
ing next Friday. It may be that
at such an early date the prospect
for improvement in the sunny side
of the University's future existence
will be greatly improved.

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EDITORIAL STAFF

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Telephone 4925

MANAGING EDITOR
ELLIS B. MERRY
Edior .....................George C. Tilley
News Editor .. . .... .......George E. Simons
City Editor.......... Pierce Rosenberg
Sports Editor ........Edward B. Warner, Jr.
Women's Editor ...........Marjorie Fohmer
Telegraph Editor.......GeargeStauter
Music and Drama ........ William Gorman
Literary Editor..........Lawrence R. Klein
Assistant City Editor....-Robert J. Feldman
Night Editors
Frank E. Cooper Robert L. Sloss
William C. Gentry Gurney Williams, Jr.
Heriry J. Merry Walter Wilds
Charles R. Kaufman
Reporters

OASTE RLL
FROSH uI1L
FROM THE
PRESS
Rolls' Own Newsreel Service (Thee
Lies and Leers of the World) with
its all-seeing and all-knowing
lenses has caught a few choice
csenes from the just-past fresh-
man week.
GRAPHIC ILLUSTRATION
OF FRESHMEN.- SENSATION
amea
J. Fillinham McGoogle, impres-
sionistic: painter from Oscaloosa,
Wis., submitted the above picture
purporting to represent the feel-
ing of the average freshman his
first day in a large university.
HOW MORALS ARE RUINED
IN A BIG UNIVERSITY
~ -

Music And Drama
DETROIT THIS WEEK: At the
Wilson Theater New York Theater
Guild presentation of George Ber-
nard Shaw's "'Pygmalion."
At the Cass, Katharine Cornell
in "The Age of Innocence," a dra-
matization of Edith Wharton's
novel of the 'mauve decade.'
Detroit Civic Theater: Jessie
Bonstelle " presents an entire new
company in A. A. Mine's charming
comedy "Meet the Prince."
Lafayette: William A. Grew's
farce-comedy, "My Girl Friday."

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Charles A. Askren
Helen Barc
Louise Behymer
Thomas M. Cooley
W. ' H. Crant
Leda u E. Davis
Helen Domine
Magaret Eckels
Katherine Ferrin
Car) Forsythe'
Sh" don C. Fullerton
Ruth Geddes
Ginevra Ginn
J. Ednmund Glavin
Tack Goldsmith
D. B. Henpstead, Jr.
Ja es'.C,Hendley
Richard T. Hurley

Jean H. Levy'
Russell E. McCracken
Lester M. May
William Page
Gustav R.. Reich
John D. Reindel
Jeannie Roberts
Joe Russell
Joseph F. Ruwitch
William P. Salzarulo
George Stauter
Cadwell Swanson
Jane Thayer
Margaret Thompson
Richard L. Tobin
Beth Valentine
Harold 0. Warren
Charles S. White
G. Lionel Willens
Lionel G. Willens
J. E. Willoughby
Barbara Wright
Vivian Zimit

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
A. J. JORDAN, JR.
Assistant Manager
ALEX K. SCHERER

F'

Department Managers
Advertising......... ...Hollister Mabley
Advertising........... Kasper H. Halverson
Ad'ertisig ...... ......Sherwood Upton
Ser~Vice ....... ..........George Spater
Circulation.................J. Vernor Davis
Acouhts. ....... ...Jack Rose
PulAicationsn................George Hamilton
Assistants

COLLEGE CHILDREN
Until the present time at least,
officials of the University have
never seen fit to admit to Michigan
children from the grade schools.
This year, however, might seem to
be the exception. While sadly real-
izing the fact that freshmen are
expected to be infantile, we have
no difficulty in picturing members,
of the class of 1933 as small boys
who take childish delight in "show-
ing the world" just how good they
are. In fact, we saw them as such
last night.
.The gangs of freshmen who
gathered together with the evi-
dent intention of hazing their
mortal enemies, the sophomores,
(who acted not a bit more ma-
ture with a year of opportunity to
lose some of their childish inclina-
tions), made it quite evident to an.
impartial observer that Michigan is
not completely getting the type of.
men it wa2uts when incidents of
this nature occur.,
Hazing is. a thing of the past.
With six-shooters, the old gray
mare, bustles, and gas lights, went
hazing. Colleges are primarily in-
tellectual and cultural institutions,
but where is the place for intel-
ligence or culture when freshmen,
sophomores,- and perhaps a few
half-witted juniors and seniors at-
tempt to determine just how near-
ly. they, can imitate savages?
Class spirit is an excellent thing,
when turned into the proper-chan-
nels. Hence, areclass games held
twiaduring the school year, so
that any emotion brewed in the
intervening time may be vented.
But we are all primarily members
of the same University and as in-
dividuals and classes should co-
ordinate rather than disrupt. Haz-
ing. once had its place in univer-
sity life, but that place is gone.
The freshmen and sophomores
particularly woulct do well to let
sleping dogs lie.
FIRST IN GLIDING

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Howard W. Baldock
Raymond Camrpbell
James E. Cartw right
Robert Crawford
Harry B. Culver
Thomas M. Davis
Jamies Hoffer
No ris'Johnson
Cullen' Kennedy
Charles Kline
Marvin Kobacker
Lawrence Lucey
George Patterson
Norman Eliezer
Anson Hoex
Robert Williamson

Thomas Muir
Charles Sanford
Lee Slayton
Roger C.Thorpe
Jeanette Dale
Bessie V. Egeland
j3ernice Glaser
Helen E. Musselwhite
Hortense Gooding
Eleanor Walkinshaw
Alice McCully'
Dorothy Stonehouise
Dorothea Waterman
Marie Wellstead

Night Editor - HENRY MERRY
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1929
FOR A PROGRESSIVE MICHIGAN
The summer apparently has done
little enough to clear up the con-
fusion surrounding M i c h i g a n's
presidential chair. Outside of the
unfortunate airing by one Regent
of his personal prejudices, but one.
hesitating step-albeit a praise-
,worthy one-has been taken.. In
the elevation of Dean Ruthven to
the "acting presidency" the Re-
gents made a safe and logical move
in complete accord with the execu-
tive wisdom of former president
Little.
We can scarcely feel, however,
that the chair will long be left
filled as at present. The conflictsI
and dissentions of President Little's
four-year regime have left the Un-
iversity in a markedly anemic con-
dition which demands more lead-
ership that can be supplied by any
niere functionary with only the
powers of acting president. This
must not be construed as reflect-
ing discredit on the ability of Dean
RFuthven. Any actihg president is
barred by the pro tempore nature
of his office and a decent consid-
eration of his successor's wishes
from embarking on vigorous and
far reaching policies.
To any one with an eye for signs
ten minutes' perusal of the 1929-30
University catalogue should dem-
onstrate the anemia from which'
Michigan is suffering. An appall-
iig number of the old-line profes-
sors who were the backbone of the
faculty have retired, resigned, or
requested a leave of absence this
year. This is certainly not a co-
incidence. The ferment of recent
years has poisoned the local well-
springs of learning with a dissatis-
faction deep-seated enough to
drive away the men who really
made Michigan what it used to be.
But when it comes to picking a
permanent president there is a dif-
ference of opinion between the
merits respectively of a local man
and a foreigner. Some reaction-
aries hold a brief for the local man

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With a considerable measure of
satisfaction The Daily reviews the
summer accomplishments of the
Michigan Glider section, not only
because they more than justify the
publicity given last year through
these columns, but because a group
of students has brought no incon-
siderable acclaim to Michigan
through their acknowledged lead-
ership of the gliding movement
now sweeping the United States.
The local glider section was thej
first club to affiliate with the Na-
tional Glider association, the sec-
ond to get in the air, the first to
qualify a member for a third class
glider pilot's license and the first
to qualify a member for a second
class license. The towing of glid-
ers behind automobiles was devel-.
oped in Ann Arbor, and members
of the local club have taken the
lead in flying behind aeroplanes.
At the recent Cleveland air show
one member won the award for the
most impressive glider performance
when he landed his ship in front
of the grandstand after ferrying it
200 miles from Detroit behind a
power plane, and another Michi-
gan trained man took a second
place with a training ship design-
ed and built here on the campus
by students.
These achievements, made possi-
ble by the generosity of several De-
troiters as well as the enthusiasm
of the students, have been further
recognized by the Exhcange Club of
Detroit which is donating a Gliders,
Inc., training ship. Our glow of'
pride in the Glider section is nat-
urally increased by such expres-
sions of interest and appreciation,
and we take this opportunity to
extend on our own behalf hearty

Oliver G. Gipsum, 'Pumpkint
Ridge, Okla., anti Abraham L.
Chudzinski, New York City, both ofI
the class of 1933, free at last from
the rigid bonds of parental care,
stay up 'till twelve midnight.-
CLASS OF' '33 ARE-
ALREADY UP IN ARMS
- 1
The Freshman ,class of 1933
(which, to be. sure, is .the biggest,1
and of course the best, Freshman1
class, ever to matriculate 'here) are1
reported to be besting the sopho-
mores at every turn. You can see
by tle 'photo that the frosh are
practically running away with the
sophomore class.
HUMANISM COMES TO A
GREAT UNIVERSITY
MICE
10 at
The dean of students poses in
the act of welcoming Chester Ho-
ratio Wheezedeedle, Flat Fish, Ariz.
Mr. Wheezedeedle wants to enter
the School of Education and will
be a Phi Beta Kappa student.
* * *
MAKE LOVE A PART OF
YOUR COLLEGE LIFE
Angus J. McNeedlepoint, '33, of
Eagle Mills, Mich. (L) has always
looked forward to the wonderful
companionships one is supposed to
form in college. Dolores Dupe, '30,
of Washington, D..C., (R) one of
the Phi Phi girls, has just been
asked by McNeedlepoint to lunch.
HOMESICK FRESHMEN
ERECT STATUETTE
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INTRODUCTION
Several types of bow would be
ppropriate to the occasion of an
ditor's introduction to his dear
ublic. One would certainly be the
pologetic greeting, pregnant with
lumility and self-deprecation, de-
igned to appease those inevitable
mes who whisper: "How dare one
o young'criticize Paderewski." An
expository one is 'perhaps needed
o satisfy those of critical conceit
who deny this column a right to
existence: with: "If I went to the
theater I know whether I liked the
play, or. not, etc." Then there are
those people who just love every-~
thing connected with the theater
and think all the actors are jolly
people because they are trying so
hard. A certain distrust of all crit-
ics in a part of the audience might
even justify a broad, sweeping bow
clearly revealing a bounding ego
capable of jumping all obstacles.
(The statement of the need of
these types of bow will have to
suffice for their conception)
But more important is the need
of remindingkall interested that
this column like its two neighbors1
is the expression of student opin
ion. For the very word student
has many implications quite rele-
vant to the matter of policy. There
are innumerable circumstances
connected with campus theatrical
productions which seriously miti-
gate against any fixed standard of
of excellence. (These limitations
are clear and all people interested
in campus dramatics are aware of
them. Therefore, underlying all
critical material in this column,
will be a knowledge and tempor-
ary acquiescence in these difficul-
ties. If at times the assumption
of them does not appear it will be
because the column intends to con-
tinue the way of ideals. To believe
that campus drama is soaring ra-
pidly to the heights is to give it 1
wings. If we somewhat consist-
ently set the star of perfection too
high it will not be because we do
not know why it is still compara-
tively--low= This should be under-
stood.
Being students, those who are
to write this column have not yet
discovered the exact location of
the aesthetic Heaven and Hell and
thus will make no pretense that
theirs are final judgments. They
have vowed to take their adventur-
ous souls the round of Detroit and
Ann Arbor dramas and concerts;
and to :honestly expose their im-
pressions to the public. Some very
disturbing confusion can arise,
though, from this innocent pro-
cess. Constructive criticism is pop-
ularly identified with praise; de-
structive criticism with unfavora-
ble reviews. This is, of course, de-
plorable. 'The writers are not par-
ticularly anxious to spill a trail of
humanity, by saccharine indul-
gence and gentle appreciation.
Neither do they wish to be men of
vitriol and extravagant spleen.
Contructive criticism lies some-
where between the two. It will be
the object of the column, then, to
present disciplined student opinion.
Again.'the word student.

HILE Yale and Princeton were battling to a.
tie at Hoboken, New Jersey, a small group
of scientists, directed by Thomas A. Edison, was busy,
at Menlo Park, only a few miles away. On October
.21, their work resulted in the first practical
incandescent lamp.
Few realized what fifty years would mean to both
electric lighting and football. The handful who
watched Yale and Princeton then has grown to tens
of thousands to-day. And the lamp that glowed for
forty hours in Edison's little laboratory made
possible to-day's billions of candle power of elec-
tric light. In honor of the pioneer achievement, and
of lighting progress, the nation this year observes
Light's Golden Jubilee.
Much of this progress in lighting has been the achieve-
ment of college-trained men employed by General
Electric.
I
JOIN US IN THE GENERAL ELECTRIC
noUR, BROADCAST, EVERY SATUR-
DAY AT 9 P.M., E.S.T. ON A NATION-
WIDE N.B.C. NETWORK

Autumn

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GEERAL ELE CTRC ECT

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W. J. G.
"PYGMALION"
Among the most important dates
on the theatrical calendar this
year are the visits of the' several
Theater Guild companies to De-I
troit. Last week the first one came
to Detroit presenting "Major Bar-
bara," Shaw's 'discussion' in three
acts.
This week the same company is
presenting another comedy of
Shaw's, "Pygmalion." This one is
more sprightly and less discursive
than "Major Barbara." The theme
of - the play is the social ele-
vation .-of a woman of the
streets achieved through h e r
training in .speech with a philolo-
gist, who undertakes the conversion
to prove' that "dutchesses can be
manufactured." Shaw's keen witty
intelligence finds many possibilitiesI
in this whimsical motive, using the
speech of the girl as a sort of sym-
bol of the superficial methods by
which respectability is secured.
There are of course many of the
Shavian overtones, shrewd. ene-

For The Miss Who Is Back To School

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THE LIGHT WOOL FROCK is practical and
she will find it especially suitable for campus.
It won't be the 'case of just one, but several of
their decided chic.
ENSEMBLE are more important than ever this
season of short jackets,-and they take liberties
that belong only to- youth 'with their yoke skirts
and tuckin blouse.
AND WHEN SHE DANCES to low crooning
jazz-her frocks must be as swaying and graceful
as the music-but with just enough snap.

HER COATS too, are cut with a .difference
They may be swagger os slightly fitted-but they
must have luxurious fur trims.
GLOVES PURSES AND SCARFS that have
the chic of the modern miss at heart are here to
complete her outfit.
AND HER INTIMATE LIFE must not be
overlooked-the cut of her lingerie as well as her
pajamas rust conform to the dash and verve of
her campus days.

Atl ARE'' MOD1ERATELY PRICED FOR THE COLLEGE GIRL BUDGET

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