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October 01, 1929 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SDAY, OCTOBER 1, 192 -TH E MITCIH-IGIA N DAILY-

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CONmCERI'TS

MAINTAINED BY

THE UNIVERSITY

MUSICAL SOCIETY-

Charles A. Sink, President,

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Earl V. Moore, Musical Director

I

1929-Fifty-First Annual Series -1930

1929- Fifty-First Annual Series-1930

October
October
November

15-GIOVANNI MARTINELLI, Metro-
politan Opera Company Tenor,.in song
recital.
30-DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHES-
TRA, OSSIP GABRILOWITSCH,
Conductor.
7-IGNACE JAN PADEREWSKI,
World's most noted pianist, in recital.

December

3-LENER-BUDAPEST STRING _
QUARTET
Jeno Lener Jinre: Hartman
Joseph Smilovits Sandor Roth

December 10-CLAUDIA MUZIO, Prima Donna
Dramatic Soprano, Chicago Civic Op-
era Association, in recital.
January 16-JASCHA HEIFETZ in violin recital.
January 31-VLADIMIR HOROWITZ, in piano
recital.

November 19-THE ENGLISH SINGERS, of Lon-
don.
Flora Mann Cuthbert Kelly
Nellie Carson Norman: Stone
Lillian Berger Norman Notley
in a program of madrigals, folk songs,
ballets, canzonets and other music.
Fifty-First Annual
Choral Union Series
^ A

February
March

12-ELISABETH RETHBERG,
politan Opera Dramatic Prima
Soprano, in recital.

Metro-
Donna

10-DETROIT, SYMPHONY ORCHES-
TRA, OSSIP- GAPRILOWITSCH,
Conductor.

S

Michigan's Greatest
Concert Series

HILL AUDITORIUM

TEN

ALL

STAR

CONCERTS

General Announcement
The University Musical Society reviews with considerable satisfaction its
record of achievements during the past- century. With such a background, it
hopes to carry on in larger measure in coning years and to continue to offer
musical' opportunities to members of the, University and the public in general of
a nature which will justify the high ideals of those musical pioneers who half a ,
century ago were instrumental in organizing the Society.
For the first season of the second half century of Choral Union Concerts,
ten outstanding numbers have been scheduled involving the artistic services of
the most eminent artists and organizations of the day, as follows:
October 15 GIOVANNI MARTINELLI

December 10 CLAUDIA MUZIO

This distinguished prima donna of the Chi-
cago Civic Opera Association was heard at an
Ann Arbor Festival a number of years ago when
she had just made her debut at the Metropolitan.
Her success at that time was profound. Con-
flict of dates and absence from the country has
prevented until this time a return engagement.
She is one of the outstanding singers of the day,
both in opera and in recital. Possessing a glorious

voice of volume and of an unusually attractive.
quality, combined with a most pleasing and at-
tractive personalty, she has becofhe one of the
most popular musicians before the public,
The Pittsburgh Post said: "What'an impres-
sionable person Claudia Muzio is! We don't
know when we have seen or heard a singer who.
has appealed more. She is so gracious, and she.
sings so amazingly well."

ii

January 16 JASCHA HEIFETZ

Senior Martinelli, for years leading tenor of
the Metropolitan Opera Company was an Italian
boy of humble circumstances. While serving in
the army of his native land, his singing attracted
the attention of his Captain who arranged for
his musical education at Milan. In 1910 he

made his debut. Puccini cast him in his opera
"The Girl of the Golden West." Continental
appearances followed and in 1913 lie made his
sensational debut at the Metropolitan Opera
House where he has continued since that time
occupying a stellar position.

This remarkable virtuoso at the age of twenty-
eight has twenty-five years of playing behind him.
He first played.the violin when he was three years
old. From that time on through his childhood
he averaged six hours a day practicing. At five
he made his first public appearance and at seven
he became a self supporting citizen. He esti-
mates that he, has played the violin for thirty

thousand hours during his life time. This is
the equivalent of playing nearly four years stead-
ily without a break, with no time out for sleep
or meals. The figure includes both the time
he has spent giving concerts and in practicing.
On his two previous appearances in Ann Arbor
he made profound impressions, and the public
has continually demanded .return engagements.

I

October 30 DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
OSSIP GABRILOWITSCH, Conductor
Mr. Gabrilowitsch who returns this season, Distinguished in both fields, he has won enviable
after a year's leave of absence, to the conductor- recognition throughout the world of music, and
ship of Detroit's famous orchestra, will conduct because of his cultured character and attractive
two concerts in the Choral Union Series. He is personality is admired by musicians and laymen
entitled to musical immortality, on two counts: everywhere. He has brought his organization to
that of conductor and that. of piano virtuoso. a remarkable state of artistic perfection.
November 7 IGNACE JAN PADEREWSKI

January 3 VLAIDMIR HOROWITZ

His career has been the logical development
of an extraordinary gift and he has made his
name in Europe on. sheer ability. He was born
in Kieff, in 1904. He studied under Professor
Felix Blumenfeld, and graduated at the age of
seventeen with the, highest honors. In 1922-3 he
played twenty-three times in Petrograd to sold-out
houses. In 1924 he toured Europe for the first

time and last year he played forty-fide engage-
ments in eighty-one days on his American .tour.
He has appeared as soloist with all of the great
orchestras in America.and in Europe as well as in
recital under the most critical auspices. He is
generally acknowledged to be "the greatest pianist
of the rising generation and the Paderewski of the
future.

IGNACE JAN
PADEREWSKI

In 1922, after a lengthy- retirement from
pianistic activities, while he, served his native
Poland as p.remier, Paderewski, returned to the
concert stage. It was an event of outstanding
importance in the realm of music" arts. The.
terrors in the war, days had infinitely enriched:
the wealth of beauty in his soul, while his in-

terpretative powers had broadened and in his
pianistic touch there appeared a fresh quality
that lifted the great Paderewski to even loftier
height than he had hitherto experienced. This
"IKing: of Pianists" will be heard for the fifth
time in Ann Arbor, in one of his brilliant stu-
pendendous programs.

JASCHA
HEIFETZ

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February 12 ELISABETH RETHBERG

November 19 THE ENGLISH SINGERS

This group of six, Flora Mann, Nellie Carson,
Lillian Berger, Cuthbert Kelly, Norman Stone:
and Norman Notley, have for many years culti-
vated ensemble singing. Their programs include
beside the madrigals, ballets, canzonets,. etc., of
the Elizabethan period, Italian and Spanish
street cries, folk songs, modern English and
French part songs and certain other works with
piano accompaniment. Olin Downes, said

"Onc of the finest concerts"; while F. D. Perkins
in the New York Herald Tribune is quoted as
saying: "A fascinating demonstration." The New
York World said that "their perfection of tone
production was a revelation"; and the New York
Sun stated that "the pictorial effect of the singers
as they sang was suggestive of some rare painting
from an old master." Such are the glowing
tributes of the great critics.

Miss Rethberg is one of the shining lights of time Richard Strauss invited her to join the
the Metropolitan Opera House. Her home was in Vienna Opera. In 1920, Nikisch engaged her
the Schwarzenberg in theErz mountains. As a for the New Year's Concert at the Gewandhaus.
child she sang the songs which her mother sang She concertized in the large cities of Germany
and at seventeen entered the Dresden Conserva- ad theC
tory to study piano. She chose singing however an e ontinent and soon forged to the front.
and after a strenuous period of study and effort Her American successes have been equally bril-
made her debut in "Der Freischutz," followed liant before the most critical and discriminating
shortly by an appearance in. Carmen. At this audiences.
March 10 DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
OSSIP GABRILOWITSCH, Conductor

}

Decemb er

3

THE LENER-BUDAPEST QUARTET

vCLAUDIA
MUZIO

This. quartet composed of Jeno Lener, first
violin, Joseph Smilovits, second violin, Sandor
Roth, viola and Imre Hartman, violoncello, will
come to America for the first time this fall. All
are products of the Budapest Academy. three
being pupils of the great Huhay, while the fourth,
Mr. Hartman, studied with Poppers The London
Evening Standard says: "Their success has been
extraordinary and they have raised chamber music
to a pitch of popularity in this country it had

not achieved since the good old days of Joachim."
In 1919 they were members of the Grand
Opera Orchestra in Budapest. When the rev-
olution broke out they retired to a remote Hun-
garian village to devote their energies to chamber
music. Two years later the quartet made its first
appearance, in Vienna with Ravel ,the great
French composer to hear his own string quartet
played. Conquests of Paris, London, and all
Europe followed.,

The full and varied activity of the Detroit.
Symphony Orchestra is a romance of musical
achievement. In the short time of nine years,
while it has been under the baton of Ossip Ga-
brilowitsch, it has built for itself solidly among
the bestsorchestras of the world, Its distinguished
conductor, in addition to possessing international
musical renown, has sound judgment which has
evolved sound constructive policies. No effort
has been spared: in assembling the excellent per-
sonnel of players including many of international

fame, and today the orchestra is famous not only
for its technical mastery but for its exquisite
purity of tone.
Counted in years the Detroit Symphony Or-
chestra is one of the youngest organizations of
its kind in the United States but it has achieved
.so much and has reached such a high standard
of performance that it can easily stand compari-
son with the oldest orchestras, not only of the
United States but of Europe.

ELISABETH
RETHBERG

SCHEDULE OF PRICES
Season tickets, ten concerts (including $3.00 May Festival Coupon)
5$6,00, .8.00, $10.00, $12.00, may be ordered at the office of the School
of Music, Maynard Street.
Remittance should be made payable to the University Musical-Society.

,GIOVANNI
MARTINELLI

and mailed to
School of Music

t. 4' y V -., - y 1
CHARLES A. SINK, President,.
Ann Arbor, Michigan

-
VLADIMIR
HOROWITZ

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