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October 29, 1929 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-10-29

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THE MICHIGAN

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COOKE IS ELECTED1
LEAGUE1DELEGATE
TO ANN VAL MEETING
Will Go to Palo Alto, California,
for Four Day Convention
in December.
COOPERATION IS MOTIVE
Students From All Schools Will
Attend Meeting To
Hear Noted Men.
Eleanor Cooke, '31, has been
elected by the Board of Directors
of the League to represent the Uni-
versity of Michigan at the annual
convention of the National Student'
Federation of America, to be held
in December at Palo Alto, Cali-
fornia. The convention lasts for
four days And has representatives
from almost every college and uni-
versity in the United States.
The purpose of the convention is
to achieve a spirit of cooperation
among the students of the United
States; to give consideration to
questions affecting student inter-
ests; to develop intelligent student
opinions on questions of national
and international importance; and
to foster understanding among the
students of the world in the fur-
therance of enduring peace.
Outstanding men from all over
the United States attend the con-
ventiony'to speak to the students.
Disseussions include subjects which'
are of major interest to all colleges
at the present time. The honor sys-
tem and student government were
questions which were stressed at
the convention last year, at which
Helen Fellows, '30, represented the
Michigan League, together with
fraternity and sorority problems.
The question of world peace, as1
concerned with the education of1
American students on world prob-
lems, is a vital concern of the as-
sociation.
The representative every year
brings back to the university ol1the,
suggestions and new ideas which
she has derived from the conven-
tion, as well as carrying to the con-
vention the knowledge which ex-
perience in the League has given
her. The position is, therefore, a;
responsible one. The convention,
in general, tends to unite moreI
closely the colleges and universi-
ties which otherwise would not have
frequent contact, in the different
sections of the country.
There is an organization in Eu-
rope which corresponds to the Na- I
tional Student Federation of
America and which keeps in con-
tact with American schools. Last
rear it was this organization which'
sponsored the visit of the African
jtudent to the various universities
Un America, including a trip to the
University of Michigan.
INVITE ALL WOMEN
TO HOCKEY SPREAD
Not only members of the class
hockey squads and students of phy-
aical education, but all women on
the campus who are interested in
the sport, are invited to the annual
f ockey spread which will take place
ft 6 o'clock tonight in the lounge
of the Women's Field House.
The spread will be informal, the
players being permitted to come
directly from the field in their
Hockey clothes, if they so desire.

Each class will put on a stunt sim-1
1iar to the ones put on at the an- I
nual hockey banquet, which comes
at the end of the hockey season.
There will be a charge of fifty cents
which may be paid at the door.
anet Michael, '31, is in charge of
the spread.
THE EXCHANGES
Word comes from London that
little princess Eliabeth, grand-
daughter of King George and
Queen Mary, will begin- her educa-
tion next April, soon after her
fourth birthday. Her first lessons,
to be given by her mother and her
governess, will be the study of
reading, writing, French, dancing
and piano. _ The princess has al-
ready shown marked interest in
books and dancing.

THEATRE SIGNIFIES "RED PLUSH AND
GILT CUPIDS" TO CORNELIA SKINNER!
1 (0is kinner, one learns, does not ,
( By Helen Bare) ' knei n cin ~o o
(think too highly of dramatic,
"The type of theatre I like means schools. "The wgay to learn to act,"
to me red plush and gilt cupids," Miss Skinner said, "is to act. Onei
said Cornelia Otis Skinner in a fire- year, let us say, in a stock company,j
side chat with the girls of Martha is very good for doing away with
inhibitions an~d self-consciousness.
Cook building Sunday night. Miss Too much, is, of course, bad.
Skinner, who is Mrs. A. S. Blodget But the theatre must have illu-
in private life, spent the week end sion," she said. "It must be gala,
as the guest of that dormitory, and and the performances in the eve-
*is a friend of Mr. William Cook, the ning-not afternoon .or morning.
donor. Somehow, the old type actor wasj
"I never forget that Otis Skinner distinguishable from other people;
that is, one could pick him out inj
is my father, when he plays," she a group.nNot so, today."mi
continued. "I may be moved, I Miss Skinner was honored, at sup-r
may cry my eyes out, but I always per on -Sunday at Martha Cook.
remember that it is all a play. President and Mrs. Ruthven, and!
"A real artist is a very simple representative members of the fac-'
person- not temperamental. Fits j ulty came to meet her. She came
of so-called temperament are mat- to Ann Arbor to give a reading yes-
ters of disposition. You know, El- terday before the Michigan Educa-
eonora Duse and Edwin Booth were tors' association. She left the city
both very simple people." yesterday afternoon to go to New
Miss Skinner has studied drama- York.
tic art both here and abroad, and
has spent a year in Paris at the
"Comedie Francaise." She also has!
studied for two years at Bryn Mawr T1 M H [ 0
college. At the "Comedie Fran- ,
caise," the requisite was to learn a
role, entirely in French, each week. lUlS
"Then there was the school in
the Latin quarter, the class meet-:
ing above the theatre. It was in Coach Halsey reports that the
winter, and the weather was freez- hockey teams are showing the re-
ing cold; each time we had a half sults of practice, and will be in the
hour of French gymnastics and best of condition by the time of!
breathing exercises. We had to the inter-class tournament, which
take our shoes and stockings offsk
and stand there, breathing deeply is set for the week after Play Day.
while the instructor ordered, in his '(The class teams will be chosenj
native tongue, 'Inspiration!' and (ultimately by the coaching staff,
'Expiration!' Later Monsieur would but each girl who is out for hockey
come, swathed in furs, and tell us is asked to turn in her choice for
about acting. ." .r the teams, and these preferences
"Concerning audiences-thehard- will be considered in making the
est audience is one of elderly club-i
women bent on uplift. A mixed final selections.
audience is easiest. High school This does not mean that other!
audiences are much too hilarious girls who are not on the first team
"Acoustics-whatever the wordwin not be allowed to
really means-are so important! At we play. It is
the Philadelphia Academy, they say the policy of the athletic depart-
the attendants are afraid to dust ment that everyone be given an
the hall because the acoustics there equal opportunity. Hence, all the
are so excellent." girls who are out for the sport willj
LEAGUE PLANS TO be on a team, whether it be first,
HOLD RECEPTION second or third class team, or a
HOLDR ECEPTO E motley team, made up of mem-
FOR ALL WOMEN bers from several classes.
Since the quality of the game as
In connection with the annual a whole depends on the skill and
fall open meeting, the League will fitness of the individual players,
also hold an informal reception one half of the practice time is al-

Coming Events
October 29-November 2:
Tuesday-
2:30-Play reading Section,
Faculty Women's Club, Feld
House.

3:30-Music Section,
Women's Club.

Faculty

4:15-Illustrated Lecture, "Fra
Angelico," by Dr. WV. R. Val-
entiner.
4:15-Interclass Hockey Prac-
tice, Palmer Field.
5:30-AlphavGamma Sigma,
League Cave.
6:00-Hockey Spread, Field
House.
6:30-Music Section, Faculty
Women's Club, Pot-luck
supper at the home of Mrs.
W. F. Hunt, 1030 Baldwin.
7:15-University Girls' Glee
Club, League C6mmittee
Room.
7:30-Portia, fourth floor, An-
gell Hall.
7:30-Athena, fourth floor,
Angell Hall.
7:30-Chi Upsilon, Atusseli
Seminar, Natural Science.
Wednesday-
4:00-Hockey: Tri. Delt vs.
Alpha Gamma Delta; Al-
pha Epsilon Phi vs. Betsy
Barbour.
4:15-Lecture on "Celtic Folk
Tale and French Romance",
by Mr. Ernest Rhys, Natural
Science Auditorium.
5:00-Hockey: Pi Phi vs. Alpha
Xi Delta; Alpha Phi vs. Al-
pha Omicron Pi.
Thursday-
3:00-New-Comer's Section,
Faculty Women's Club,
home of Mrs. John F. Effin-
ger, Martin Place.
4:15-Lecture by President
Alexnder G. Ruthven, Room
D., Alumni Memorial Hall.
4:15-Last Interclass Hockey
Practice, Palmer Field.
5:00-Board of Representa-
tives, League Committee
Room.
5:30-Student Press Club,
League Tea Room.
Friday-
4:15-Lecture on "Four Years
at the Court of the Sultans
of Java, by Mr. Tassito
Adam, Natural Science Au-
ditorium.
7:30-Cabaret Dinner, Field
House.
Saturday-
9:00-W. A. A. Play Day, Field
House.
7:00-Michigan Author's As,
sociation, Private Dining
Room, League.

AMY JOOMIS TO RESUME POSITION
OF DIRECTING JUNIOR GIRLS' PLAY
S OOMIS T AR Sion in using more than twoNPenes,
RE URNPROMISES NEW AIR OF
COLLEGIATENESS IN the opportunities for lighting ef-
PRODUCTION. fects and stage pictures which arePL
greater this time than ever before. -
Amy Loomis, the first ex-member justify it.
AmyLooisthefirt e-mebe By their use of the League thea-; Zeta Tau Alpha, Sigma Kappa;
of a Junior Girls' play cast to di- tre for their annualgu pla Migs
rect production after it has become Loomis feels that the junior women Also Victorious in
atraditin hs reumd tt up are definitely putting their stamp Hockey Games.
sition which she held once beforeIo w ucsieyas ihte upon it with no limit set upon the ___
for two successive years. With the time at which they may begin using Kappa Kappa Gamma took
return of Miss Loomis, the spirit it for rehearsals they will be able to'
of the play promises to assume rehearse for as long a time before easy victory, 0-0, over Kappa Delta
that air of collegiateness that she the final staging of the production in one of yesterday's intramural
instilled intoher first production, as they desire. hockey contest. Zeta Taus Alpha
Miss Loomis hopes that the play At the time of the first Junior defeated Chi Omega 3-0, and Sig-
will be not onlyamusin but that Garls' play which Miss Loomis di-I ma Kappa eliminated Martha Cook
willev atac gf'h rected, it was said of the play that
it will leave a trace of the beautyi "caught the spirit of college 0.
and glamor which will always sur- idioms and used them to advan- Of the 9 scores made by Kappa
un c f rom~i+hie the t-tage." The wealth of local color Kappa Gamma Annette Cummins

November 13 in the League ball-I
room, to which every UniversityI
.woman is cordially invited. Presi-I
dent Alexander G. Ruthven and,
Mrs. Ruthven, and Mrs. Myra B.
Jordan, dean emeritus of women,
will be guests of honor at the re-
ception. Dr. Ruthven will be the
speaker of the evening.
Every year the League holds two
open meetings, one in the fall and
one in the spring, in addition to the
series of parties given by the
League. This year the open meet-
ing will be combined with a recep-
tion, and will have little of the for-
mality of a meeting withbthe ex-
ception of the opening by Mar-,
garet Bush, '30, president of the
League.
In the receiving line will Presi-
dent Ruthven, Mrs. Ruthven, Miss
Alice Lloyd, Miss Grace Richards,
Mrs. Byrl Foxbacher, Mrs. Jordan,
Margaret Bush, and Jean Wallace,
'30.
NOTICE.
All women archers are re-
quested to come out this week
for practices so that the best
marksman may be determined
for the Play Day competition
this week end.

ways devoted to a study of tech-
nique and tactics. Of the eight
teams which are out for practice at
the same time, four of them are
on the field actually playing, While
the other four are occupied in get-
ting the finer points of their form'
into shape.
Miss Halsey says that she finds
that the girls who play hockey us-
ually improve physically during the
season.

The Frock For You

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College Beauty
Shoppe
Shampoo and Finger
Wave $1.00
or
Shampoo and Marcel
$1.00
Beautiful Marcel Effect
Permanent Waves
$7.50
OPEN EVERY EVENING
Phone 22813
Corner State and Liberty

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Special Month-End Sale
TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY
10% DISCOUNT ON DRESSES
Beautiful quality materials in important
A I I Ia e- thr aUn nutsanrUine Dress

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