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October 29, 1929 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-10-29

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TH} I &iH I GAN DAIL

mi

ANTHROPOLOGY

HEAD

TELLS

OF MUSEUM PROGRESS

DR GUTHE P KS FORMER FLORIDA GOVERNOR ON TRIAL) H GE WK CHNSMUSICIAN SPEAKS RHPIPRA EUCTIN
* iii Lfl FOR HELPING COUNTERFEITING RING ON BACH'S WORK
TS r ES HOQINCGf~fi k£ in a lecture combining musicME F6HH '
ON RACIAL [I81 [[NIL GAIN MrEetF
graduate of the Royal College of
pYMusic at London, discussed "Bach
Us273 Groups Which Involve 1850 and His Contribution to Music Dr. Moehiman Addresses Group Delegat
Institutions are Formed yesterday in Hill Auditorium. Spe- on Public Educational Ac

ASSOCIA9TF[OI
IL CNETO
es Form Special Meetings
cording to Particular

C

Collection is Most Scientific
Display of Anthropology
in Middle West.
STARTED 60 YEARS AGO
Dr. Steere Was First to Collect
Specimens from Foreign {
Civilization.

in Various States. cial interest in the University lec Possibilities. Interests.
ture was caused by the fact that
SMALL BANKS ABSORBED Mr. Fowles illustrated all his points
SMAL BNKS ABORBD ,in connection with the harmony of SCHOOL I5) RESPONSIBLE PLAN LUNCHEON TODAY
- - Bach's music by playing the fug-
^ 'a OAsociated P-s1 ues and etudes himself. The pro- "Public education in our govern- The ninth district of the Michi-
NEW YORK, Oct. 28.-The gram was concluded by his rendi- mental concept rests on the will of gan Educational association con-
American Bankers' association de- tion of several Bach inventions. si.vened for its opening at Hill Audi-
L...a., -- -1Q~ %1-I",--- -the pole." said Dr. A.B. Moehl- vne_ fr tsopnig-t.il Ad-

Nearly sixty years ago a Dr. J.
P. Steere, of the University ofE
Michigan, started on a trip around!

3

dlared Sunday that 1,850 banks in i
39 states, with resources of $13,-
275,000,000, had been swept into-
various chain groups by the force
of the "seismic revolution" against!
individualism.
The associa:-on issued its first;
countrywide survey of chain andf
ygroup banking. .Two hundred. and

,; .

the world to collect material for .. * M seventy-three bank chains have
the campus museum. Five years Assrciatcd Prss Por sprung into existence. Details of
later he returned with beginnings Showing Sidney Catts (center . former governor of Florida, who i their organization and the swift
of a group of oriental specimens in on trial in Tampa with the charge of aiding in financing a $10000( progress of the movement from
counterfeiting Ping. ;coast to coast suggest the rise of
wood, stone, cloth, and metal which something akin to a modern feuda-
formed the basis for a collection B. AND G. O YS QUIT TEA PARTIES listic regime in finance.
that has grown to a figure around$' T G O SQ I E A TE tLr etro ahgopi
10,000.hThis collection was placed' TO KEEP GROUNDS SPICK AND SPAN powe findividual.bainkor'hold-
on exhibit last week-end at the new -~~--t----- ing company. Small units, by the
University Museum building, "and 'Specialization of activity on the ing and disposing of waste mater- sate of exchange of shares, ally
for the first time in the history of part of the B. and G. boys in re- ial. a piece of scrap paper or a dis- themselves to these stronger inter-
the Ann Arbor institution, the pub-gd ests for mutual beneft and pro-
lic has access to the greater major- gard to the nmanner of collection of carded book or magazine goe, tetion.
ity of one of the best scintific It has increased the efficiency of through a rather complicated pro- The survey reveals that the
layouts in the middle west. disposal of .the waste material, cess after being tossed into one os movement has not been confined to
In an interview with Dr. Carl thereby augmenting the total in- the many waste baskets in the var- one 'part of the country. Chain
Guthe, head of the Anthropology come of the department, and, sec- ious campus buildings. The wast banking has made as rapid head-
museum, the history of this huge ondly, it has decreased the political . way in the west as in the east or
collection was made known. It has potency ad fraternal friendliness papei from these receptacles i: niddle-west. The banks of Minne-
been under Dr. Guthe that the lay- of the B. and G. janitors. dumped into a large container b ;ota have adopted the idea in
out has been organized, separated, !In the present system of collect- the janitor of that particular build- greater numbers than those of any
and installed with suchgreat effi-- ing in which the individual basket other state. Thirty-four separate
ciency that a child may understand out in search of new material and are located and these large con chains have been formed in Minne-
its purpose. came back to Michigan with over tainers are carted to baling ma- sota. They include 435 banks.
kIf visitors are ,ooking for an art 1,000 pieces of unbroken and a largeI New York's i7 chains include
exhibit, they had better go into the number of broken exhibits. He se- chines by another man who assort; 117 banks and represent aggregate
etroit, instit.They won't find cured most of his collection in China the paper and bales it in package assets of $4,206,790,000. Other
it here. We . have made this scien-. and the Philippines, touching other weighing 100 to 120 pounds. Thes states where chain systems repre-.
tific collection with a purpose," said oriental countries on the trip. baling offices are located in the sent more than a billion dollars in
Dr. Guthe. Although it is a "public" The last addition made was in basements of Angell hall, the Gen- assets are California, Illinois and
exhibit in one sense of -the word, it 1926 when Mr. and Mrs. Fred W. eral library, the new Museum build- Michigan.
will be necessary to secure the per- Stevens of Grand Rapids donated ing, and the West Engineering an- The economic policy commis-
mission from the Anthropology de-. 1,200 pieces to the growing assem- nex. sion, which prepared the report
partment or from Mr. Williams who blege. Mr. and Mrs. Stevens had After a sufficient number of found no evidence to support the
has charge of group tours about the lived in Pekin in 1920, and their bales accumulate, bids are opened assumption that the development
building. The collection is far too collection included furniture, cloth- and the paper is sold to the highest of chain banking was a "reaction
valuable to leave entirely open. ing, and miscellaneous trinkets of bidder. Most of the bales are sold against restrictions imposed on the
Delving into the history of the the Chinese people. to the paper mills in Monroe where multiple-office banking of the
"Oriental Room", as it is now called, During the last ten days work the waste products are made into branch banking form by anti-
Dr. Guthe continued his story of has been progressing on this ex- heavy cardboard lining or automo- branch banking laws."
the progress that has been made in hibit, which was completed over bile bodies, or to the Simplex Pa- The commission states that a
this direction. Following the Steere Sunday. It is situated in a special per Company at Adrian, where the sharp difference sof opinion exists
collection in 1875, a large group of room of the Anthropology depart- scrap is ground, bleached, and con- among various state bankingcom-
pieces were added eight years later ment, and will probably be per- erted into high grade writing paper.missiones. Some commissioners
through the courtesy of the Chin- mantly located there unt-il a larger Prior to the inception of the pres- who answered the cquestionaire
ese government and President An- space is found. Its present location ent system, each janitor carried.the favored the encouragement of
gell, who had once been minister to is directly across the corridor from paper accumulated on his floor to chain banking under certain condi
China_ and was on very friendly the office of Dr. Guthe, on the Uni- the baler nearest his building andions. Others cited abuses which
-relations with the far east. The versity Avenue wing. 1 arranged with janitors from other tihe Othe te sswhich-
exhibit thus acquired came directly Among the interesting exhibits floors and even from other build- they felt, made the system un-
to the old museum, which was lo- displayed one in particular will be ings that they would all arrive atworkable.
cated in what is now the-Romance of utmost interest to the casual the
Language building, from New: -Or- Ivisitor. It is a Chinese table cloth formal ti usually of a fBrummi Address
leans where the story of world made out of innumerable pieces hour's duration, would thene ensue,,I
cotton production had just been and fastened together with thread. and the problems of the day would Teachers Convention
shown in a nation-wide fair. These It is placed between two.glass plates be leisurely discussed. _naEd
two collections comprised, for nearly for sake of preserving it in its en- To spike these daily confabs, Ed-
hal a entry th wel knwn irty.Anohe ineretig dsply ward S. Warren, janitor foreman,! Prof. John Lewis Brumm of the
half a century, the well - known tirety. Another interesting display instituted the system now in use, department of Journalism will lec-
"Chinese Exhibit", more familiar to is the Stevens-Chinese governmen- hh
Michigan alumni than to coitem- tal layout of inlaid furniture, which thereby curtailing the group power I ture before the meeting of the-
porary students. includes hand carved ebony sets and of the B. and G. paper-picke Illinois State Teacher's Association
In 1925, Dr. Guthe himself went 'much teek and rose wood. in Joliet at their oneday conven-
The library of the University of tion November 1.
Texas contains twice as many vol- Professor Brumm treating upon
umes as any of the 16 other major the subject, "The Citizen and the
For those who dem anduniversities and colleges of the Press." will discuss the educational
South. Their total is 411,310 books, tendencies of the day and especial-
* m ly the newspaper as a means of
h b s Dce r e t s and the University of North Caro fostering interest in educational
the best D ance Ur~clestras lina is second with only 198,192. reforms.
The Victors
The Aristocrats The O NMic
ThehMhiganders EBERB AH &N
The Varsity SerenadersF
ESTABLISHED 143
WOOLNER ORCHESTRA SERVICE
515 Monroe SIDNEY H. WOOLNER Phone 21869 SCIENTIFIC

Mr. Fowles has been a close stu-
dent of musical harmony for over
20 years, and has been awarded
sever l scholarships to universit-
ties at Oxford and London for work
in this field. His special interest in
Bach is responsible for his publi-
cation of "Studies in Bach Two-
Part Playing," which is accepted
as the standard work on this sub-
ject.
DELEGATES TALK
ON STUDENT ART
Art and its relations to public
schools and high schools was the
subject discussed by various speak-
ers at the meeting of the art sec-
tion of the Michigan Education as-
sociation yesterday in the auditor-
- ium of the School of Architecture.
The meeting was under the chair-
manship of Bertha Goodison, of
the art department of Ypsilanti
Normal college.
Prof. Emil Lorch of the College
of Architucture spoke on "Art in
the High School." Frank Hendry,
superintendent of schools in Royal
Oak, spoke on "The Relation of the
Art Department to the Other De-
partmeht of the Public School."
Oliver G. Frederick, assistant su-
perintend of schools in Detroit,
spoke on "Public School Art From
the Superintendent's Viewpoint."+
F-
-2?2

u °''N" . . torium at eight o'clock Monday
man, professor of administration morning. After the initial addresses
and supervision, in adressing the and announcements had been made
opening meeting of the ninth divi- the delegates split up into seperate
sion of the Michigan Educational I groups and attended the meetings
association here Monday morning. of their several callings. There were
In his discussion of the relation speeches at various parts of the
of schools and the teaching pro- campus and at the two high schools
fession to the public Dr. Moehlman on all subjects of interest to the
stated that the character of educa- teaching profession and amuse-
- ion would be determined by the ments were offered the delegates
feeling of the general public to- by high school groups from this
wards it, and that, in turn, the pub- part of the state.
lic sentiment in this regard was Luncheons are to be served at
based on the education and cultural the League building and the -Union
and religious background. Tuesday and there will be a general
"The natural tendency," he said, meeting again at Hill Auditorium
"was to look to the past for ideals.I at two o'clock, where the visitors
For this reason it is only through will be addressed by Dr. John Mur-
continuous education that under- ray, principal of the University
standing and support may be se- College, Exeter England. After the
cured by the teaching profession in business meeting, officers for the
their efforts". coming season will be elected.

Dr. Moehlman went on to state
that the greatest responsibility forj
creative leadership in the .matter
lies with the profession itself.. He;
showed that each teacher must have
a thorough understanding of the
problems of the day in the social
system, and must realize in full the
responsibilities as well as the privi-
leges of his calling.
"This means", said Dr. Moehlman
is closing, "that every professional
organization in every school com-
munity is definitely responsible to
the public for education with re-'
spect to worth, condition, and needs
of its public schools."

Butler Will Address
Journalist Meeting
Hackley Butler, who has just re-
turned from Asia, will speak of his
"Travels" before the Student's
Journalistic Club at a dinner to be
given in the tea room of the
Women's League building tonight.
Mr. Butler left Manchuria j ust
before the outbreak of the con-
flict between the Russians and Chi-
nese there recently. He will speak
on condition* leading to the clash.

'I
..
i
'
A
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