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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 10, 1929 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, OCTOBERI 10, ,1920

T HE MICHIGAN

DAILY

PAGE

DAILY

PAGIE FIVE

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INTEACLASS

HOCKEY

ENTRANTS IN NATIONAL AIR TOUR Athena Literary and

TEAM OPEN SEASON
WITH GOODPROSPECT
GERTRUDE SIMTH, '30, MANAGER
ANNOUNCES SCHEDULE
} OF PRACTICES
TOURNAMENT ARRANGED
Demand for More Volunteers;
Veterans Fill Many
Positions
By Barbara Wright
The interclass hockey prospect
looked unusually promising Tues-
day afternoon when 80 players
turned out for the first practice.
Old players who have proved their
abilities and new recruits to whom
the possibility of stardom is open
jined in the throng who will com-
pete for positions on their class
teams.
Last year the senior eleven won
the hockey trophy, while the sopho-
mores were runners-up. The lat-
ter now comprising the junior
team seem confident of victory this
year- and promise through the
competitive spirit they have already
aroused to provide an exciting and
closely contested tournament. How-
ever, both the junior and senior
teams need more volunteers and
the two managers send out a plea
for anore women, whether they
have, played hockey or not, to ap-
pear :af the next practice.
Gertrude Smith is general man-
ager: of inter-class hockey and
took charge of the Tuesday prac-
tice. A manager has been appoint-
ed for each team except the fresh-
men'group, which elected Annette
Cummings to this office Tuesday.
Team managers hold their posi-
tions during several practice ses-
sions, then captains are elected in
their, place to pilot their teams
through the remainder of the sea-
son.,
'New Plan Is Used
A pew plan for the inter-class
tourz'ament is being instituted this
year. Each class will have its first
and second teams with separate
tournamerits for the A and B elev-
ens, in order to further interest in
sports among those who are not
unusually proficient but enjoy play-
ing for the sake of the game.
Seven practices will be held be-
fore the opening contest of the
tournament, October 31. Practice
games are scheduled every Tues-
day. and Thursday afternoons at
4:00; upperclass women who attend
all of these sessions will receive
credit in required physical educa-
tion-.
All four teams showed good ma-
terial, with many of last year's vet-
erans back and many who seem to
have latent possibilities. Of course,
the teams have been viewed in ac-
tion in a better organized practice
no prediction can be definite until
than that of Tuesday.
Dorothy Bloom, senior manager,1
and Herma Grabowski will probably
hold down their last year's inside
positions. Last season's entire back-'
field reported for practice. This.
trio, made up of Margaret Ohlson,
Peg Bush, and Dorothy Marshick,
bids fair to take its place intact on
the senior team. Mildred Cassidy
of former fame is back at wing po-
sition; Frances Sackett and Mar-
ion Geib will probably again make
up the backfield. This line up
leaves room for three novices andj
may include more, depending on
their play in the next few practice
sessions.
Juniors 'Look Good
Helen Wilson is managing the
junior team and back at her half-
back station with Helen Moore and
Elizabeth Whitney. Frances Whip-

ple and Margaret Eaman who
showed up unusually well last sea-
-~I
Furs and Fur Coats
Makeup, Repaired, Re-
modelled and Relined
Prices Reasonable
E. L. Greenbaum
448 Spring Street
Phone 9625
SPECIA L!
Shampoo and Finger Wave
.or long 'Bobs.
$1.25

Debating Society Has{
Sixteen New Membersf
ISixteen women (Iualified for
membership in Athena, national,
literary and debating society, at the
tryouts, which were held at 8
o'clock Tuesday night in the
IAthena room in Angell Hall. This
number is larger than that which
the organization had originally
planned to accept, but because of a
large number of tryouts and the re-
sultant competition, the following
women were elected:
Pearl Beutler '33 Belle Bolotin
'33, Madeline Cole '33, Maxine,
Fisher '33, Lucille Georg '33, Eva
Hesling '31, Dorothy Holliday '31,
Olimpia La Marca '31, Alice Mann
'30, Donna McCaughna '31, Char-
lotte Munch '30, Ruth Penty-,
Gale Saunders '31, Florence Seys
'31, Elizabeth Shull '33, Lois Van
Dusen '30.+
OUT-OF-TOWN GAMES i.
As in years past, the University
is unwilling to take full respon-
sibility for permitting women to
travel to out-of-town football
games. The advisers are there-
fore asking that letters from
parents should be filled with
them giving such permission and
stating their approval of'the ar-
rangements made for transpor-
tation to and from the games.
For the game at Urbana there
Swill be a special train with a car
for the women who plan to go.
No ticket will be sold by the
Michigan Central agents with-
out a permit card issued by the
advisers' office. This card will be
given as soon as the parent's let-
ter is filed. We wish to ask es-
pecially that the women avoid
waiting until the last minute to
make their arrangements. Con-
fusion both for the students and
the office can thus be averted.
Alice C. Lloyd, f
Adviser to Women.
Alpha Omicron Pi announces the
pledging of Grace Swartz, '31, of f
Detroit.I

JOURNALISTIC SO
SURVEY OF W(
A cross section of the journalistic
situation for women in the United!
States, especially in the Middle
West and Chicago, is indicated in a
a survey made by the Women's Na-
tional Journalistic Register. This
organization is a vocational service
for women journalists conducted by
Theta Sigma Phi, national honor-
ary professional journalistic soror-
ity. Through this service several
hundred newspaper women find
employment each year, several
M M'an women being among
thmn.
The survey contains the results
of research made over a period of
nine years and the general conclu-
sions may be considered very ac-
curate. The best time for a woman
journalist to get a job is in the fall.
September, October, and November
are the most active months, al-
though the spring is also a good
season.
A wider variety of journalistic
work for women is offered in the
large cities, about 65 per cent of the
small town jobs being for reporters.
Over 50 per cent of the openings
filled by the Register last year were;
for editorial work, 25 per cent for
advertising and publicity combined,
the rest for routine work including
stenography.
Salaries for beginners range from
$18 to $25 a week. Of all women
placed last year 56 per cent re-
ceived $25 and under, 36 per cent
$25 to $35, and only 8 per cent over
$35. Women with journalistic train-J
ing in college usually get $25 a week
at the beginning, especially in
large cities. Salaries in publicity
and advertising are considerably
higher than in editorial work, but
the opportunities for women are
fewer.
A knowledge of stenography-
shorthand and typing-is a decided
asset in getting a journalistic posi-

RORITY MAKES NOCES
OMEN'S POSITIONS

tion. It is invariably a qualification.
for an editorial assistant. Contrary
to the popular belief, employers
favorhiring women who have had
some journalistic training in col-
lege,
The Women's National Journalis-
tic Register supplies employees for
some of the leading magazines and
newspapers of the country. Proof-I
readers, reporters, editors, editorial
assistants, copywriters, and special
writers are secured on a non-profit'
basis. The serice is designed to sup-
ply employers with university wom-1
en whose talent, experience, and
professional education fit them for
positions in the editorial, advertis-
ing, or any other allied field.
Acting on the advisory council of
the Register are Mary Roberts
Rinehart, Zone Gale, Fannie Hurst,
Dorothy Dix, Sophie Kerr, H. F.
Harrington, dean of the MedillC
School of Journalism; Walter Wil-
liams, dean of the School of Jour-
nalism at the University of Mis-
souri; W. G. Bleyer, dean of, the
School of Journalism at the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin; James Melvin,
Lee, dean of the School of Journal-
ism at New York University; Nelson
Antrim Crawford, publicity direc-
tor of the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture; M. L. Spencer,
president of the University of
Washington, and Lew Sarett, poet.

There will be a meeting of all
sophomore women at 3 o'clock to-
day in the Board of Representatives'
room on the second floor of the
League to hear the report of the
committee on a class activity, for
this year.
Comedy Club will hold a meting
at 4 o'clock today in 203 University
Hall. All members are urged to be
present since comprehensive plans
will be made for the year's pro-
gram.
Second semester freshmen and
upperclass women are eligible to try
out for the business staff of the
Michiganensian. Those desiring to
try out can come to the office in
the Press building at 4 o'clock today.
The intramural tennis tourna-
ment schedule has been posted in
the field house. All women who
have signed up should see their op-
ponents and arrange a match as
soon as possible.

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f

j Associated Press Photo
Three women are among the thirty pilots participating in the na-
tional air tour which started from the Ford airport in Detroit. They
are shown before the start of the 5,000-mile flight. Left to right:
Francess Harrell, May Haizlip, and Mrs. Keith Miller.

WOMEN'S STAFF TRYOUTS.
Second semester freshmen and'
upperclass women are eligible tof
try-out for the staff of the Wom-
en's page this semester. The work
will include news and feature
writing, offering a wide variety
of experiences in the journalis-
tic field.
A meeting at which time pre-
liminary instructions will be giv-
en to tryouts will be held in the
office of The Michigan Daily at
4 o'clock tomorrow. All those who
are interested will be given an
opportunity to do reportorial
work at once.

r
f
I

W. A. A. HAS FIRST
MEETING OF YEAR
The W A. A. board recently held
its first supper-meeting of the year
at the W. A. A. building. The
meeting opened with a supper
cooked by, members of the board.
After the traditional service of each
member walking around the table'
and introducing herself and her
position on the board had, been
held, regular business was conduct-
ed.

i
1

Investigations made by the Bu-
reau of Education show to what ex-
tent the women in the various col-
leges share in earning their ex-
penses, at least in part. The most
outstanding fact is that the small-
est percentage of employed women
college students are enrolled in the
women's colleges, where expenses
are the highest, and in the teach-
ers' colleges, where, on the other
hand, expenses are at a minimum.
More than three times as many
women who are employed gainfully
are enrolled in co-educational col-
leges than in all other institutions.
The greatest number of employed
college women are working in Illi-
nois, New York, California, Penn-
sylvania, Maryland, Minnesota,
Ohio, and Washington.

Many Women
College

Earn
Expenses

Co-education today means co-
occupation as well. Statistics show
that one college woman out of every
four assist financially in obtaininga
her education.

..

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M-.ft , ,

Attention!

Attention!

!I

son are on. hand again; Esther
Koch is a veteran goal keeper who
will undoubtedly handle that posi-
tion this season. The inner posts
were capably held last year by
Helen Domine and Albertina Mas-
len, who will try for the inside field
again. Elizabeth Wood who show-
ed unusual ability as a speedy wing
last year will probably play on the
outer field. With Margaret Seeley
the number of old players on this
team totals ten. The material all
looks good, for iadditionto almost
enough veterans to make a team,
a number of the new players show-
ed up well.
The sophomore group is man-
aged by Emily Bates, though she
has not played before on a class
team. Twenty-five reported for
practice Tuesday with the prospect
of more coming out next week. So
with 8 of their number back from
the freshman team there is a
chance that the sophomores may
develop a threat to the junior
team. Betty Healy, with Marjorie
Ellsworth and Doris Millar are at
their posts again in the backfield,
and Betty Louden and Dorothy
I Birdsell will contest again for full
back positions. Mary Lou Her-
shey will probably guard the goal
again, with Dorothy Felske on one
side of the inner field and Dorothy
Ellsworth on a wing post.

Elections were held to fill recent-
ly vacated board positions, and the
following girls were selected: Vice-
president, Janet Michael, '31; point
recorder, Ruth Marshall, '31; out-
door manager, Dorothy Ellsworth,
'32; and tennis manager, Arlene
Heilman, '30.
The committee heads gave their
reports, and Dr. Margaret Bell
opened discussion about plans for
a W. A. A. Play Day to be held the
week-end of the Ohio State game.
Meetings are to be held on Thurs-
day nights in the future instead of
on Tuesdays, and two girls were t
appointed to take charge of cook- 1
ing the supper for each meeting.
Since the informal hockey spread
comes Oct. 24, the last Tuesday
meeting before the new rule goes
into effect will be held Oct. 22.
Portia Holds Second1
Membership Tryouts
Twelve women were recalled for,
second tryouts by Portia, national I
literary society, after a meeting
Tuesday night, October 8, in the'
Portia room in Angell hall. Any
other women who may have been
unable to come then are invited to,
attend the second tryouts, which
will be held at 7:45 o'clock, Tuesday
night, October 15, in the Portia'
room on the fourth floor of Anigell
hall.

Hats Made to Order
New Models Each Week
McKinsey Hat Shop
227 South State Street

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Ki ey Shoes
POPULAR PRICED FOOTWEAR FOR
MEN AND WOMEN

Chubb House
209 So. State St.
FRITZ HAHN, Proprietor, (also of German American Restaurant East
William Street)
Announces to the public and to all students
of the University of Michigan in particular that
beginning this next week (Sunday, October 13th)
he will sell weekly tickets for $5.75 with a rebate of
25c for each meal missed.
Single Meals-
Luncheon 50c Dinner 65c
Sunday Dinner 75c
In his beautifully decorated dining roolm all
will enjoy the meals prepared by his new and
experienced chef.
- - --

Many
Styles
to
Select
From
AA
To
C
Wide

$3.98

House
Slippers
And
Mules
Dainty
Colors
In
Kid
And
Satins

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WOMEN'S Three-eyelet
Ta. Black Lizzard Vamp
with Patent or Black Kid
Quarter. Spike Heel.

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MEN'S
OXFORDS
And Hiking Shoes
Grain Leathers and Light
Calf
$2.98 to $5.98

GYM SHOES
For Men and Women
Various Styles and
Weight
79c to $2.98

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Contour Hair Cutting
Feattured by
MR. MAURICE
The kind of cut that make you appreciate a Bob

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Dial 3083

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Bein Jolie foundation garments are always indicators of the
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bring out the subtle rotundities of the current fashion. Sketched
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