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October 10, 1929 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1929-10-10

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

".C'HMSI)AY, OCTO EP 10, 13M

PAGET'OT?~ I-I MTCTGA flTLY HURDAY.OCTBE..0._..9

Published every morning except Mon(ay
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
in this paper and the local news published
herein.
"Entered at the posto..ce at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
waster General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail, $4.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May.
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.

'

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
ELLIS B. MERRY

Editor. ..................George C. Tilley
City Editor............ Pierce Rosenberg
News Editor ..............Ge E. Simons
Sports Editor ........Edward B. Warner, Jr.
Women's Editor............Marjorie Follmer
Telegraph Editor........... George Stauter
Music and Drama ........William J. Gorman
Literary Editor.........Lawrence R. Klein
Assistant City Editor....-Robert J. Feldman
Night Editors
Frank E. Cooper Robert L. Sloss
William C. Gentry Gurney Williams, Jr
Henry J. Merry Walter Wilds
Charles R. Kaufman
't Reporters

Charles A. Askren
Heln Barct
Louise Behymer
Thomas M. Cooley
W. H. CraneJ
Ledru E. Davis
Helen Domine
Margaret Eckels
Katherine Ferrin
Carl Forsythe
Sheldon C. Fullerton
Ruth Geddes
Ginevra Gin
?admund Glavin
ack Goldsmith
M, B. Hempstead, Jr.
James C. Hendley
Rlichard T. Hurley
Jean H. Levy
Russell E. McCracken
Lester M. May

William Page
Gustav R. Reich
John D. Reindel
Jeannie Roberts
Joe Russell
oseph F. Ruwitch
Villiam P. Salzarulo
George Stauter
Cadwell Swanson
Janie Thayer
Margaret Thompson
Richard L. Tobin
Beth Valentine
Harold 0. Warren
CharlesS. White
G. Lionel Willens
Lionel G. Willens
J. E: Willoughby
Barbara Wright
iVivian Zimit

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
A. J. JORDAN, JR.

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Assistant Manager
ALEX K. SCHERER

THE PENALTY OF TACT
When any individual is elevated
to a capacity of trust and large re-
sponsibility by rote and in accotd-
ance with the expectations of his I
colleagues, there is bound to be!
more prediction and less specula-I
tion regarding his future actions!
than in the case of one who has-
come above the horizon very sud-
denly. This is particularly true in
the academic world, in which
Ideas, policies and even criteria arel
quite often nebulous.i
It was, therefore, in no degree
astounding that a battery of pre-
dictions should have followed in
the wake of President iuthven's
appointment. These consisted
chiefly in high praise and wide ap-
proval of Dr. Ruthven's intentions
toward the presidency, particular-
ly as he expressed them in a state-
ment issued shortly after his se-
lection. The contents of this mes-
sage have been fine-combed, ad-
judged, and plumbed for their de-
finite meanings, if any. In the
meantime, the statement is old
enough to objectify completely
President Ruthven's aims without
their being confounded by personal
feelings toward his success over
other competitors for the presi-
dency.
Viewed soberly, the gleanings
from President Ruthven's first
publication of his educational con-
cepts have value only insofar as
they are indicative of the tremen-
dous scope of his interest in the
University's affairs. As for its
other values, one would do well to
permit Dr. Ruthven ampledtime for
sawing the academic wood; it is
only through a study of his actual
accomplishments that an accurate
dissociation can be made between
the portions of his initial tract on
educational affairs which were in-
tended for more or less immediate
action, and those which were de-
vised for tactful equivocation.
HOOVER'S TARIFF STAND
Mourning President Hoover's loss
on the flexible tariff measure be-
fore the Democratic-Insurgent bloc
in the Senate, the Ann Arbor Daily
News editorially fears the collapse
of the principle of government by
the majority.
When the administration suffers
a legislative defeat after the elec-
tors have approved the adminis-
tration's campaign platform, they
say, it *may be logical to ask
whether the will of the majority
is allowed to prevail. If the House
also defeats Hoover's views on the
tariff measure, as the Senate has
will not sectional interests and not
national interest be dictating ad-
ministration policies? their editor-
ial concludes.
Now, when Mr. Hoover went into
office last November, he was sup-
ported by the majority of the Re-
presentatives and Senators, who of
course, represent the national le-
gislative will. He has now lost the
backing of one of these bodies, the
Senate..
National views change from time
to time, and the only way they can
be formally expressed is through
the members of Congress who are
constantly and closely in touch
with the electorate. An expres-
sion, in this manner now, is surely
far more representative of the na-
tional will, than an expression
taken nearly a year ago, and which
was largely the expression of that
section which controlled the mar-
ginal votes.

The question at issue in the le-
gislative-administratIve battle over
the tariff, is not one of whether na-
tional or sectional interests will
dictate administrative policies, as
the Daily News suggests, but
whether year old or present day
interests will be the deciding fac-
tor0

TAED ROLL
ADDITIONAL
APOLOGIES TO
RIPLEY
Due to the tremendous success
of last week's Believe It or Else
Don't column it seems advisable to
follow it up with another before
the enthusiasm of the readers goes
on the wane; so the Rolls Glean-
ing Department sent out several
representatives to glean a few cam-
pus facts to be added to those al-I
ready on file with the Rolls Oddity
Bureau. They are published here
for the first-and probably the last
-time.
A*
Last Tuesday morning at 9:48 in
front of Angell hall Frank Snitch,
'32, met Joe Hokum, '32, for the
firsttime since last June. They
talked for nine and one-half min-
utes and not once during the
course of the conversation did one
say to the other, "Didja havva a
good summer?"
* * *
(Well, you don't have to be-
lieve it)
* * *

DETROIT THIS WEEK:
Wilson: The New York Theatrej
Guild presents "Wings Over Eur-
ope," a brilliant play of ideas by'
Robert Nichols and M a u r i ce
Browne.
Cass: Irene Bordoni, delectable
European comedienne, with Irving{
Aaronson and his "Commanders" I
in the musi-comedy "Paris."
Civic Theatre: "Meet the Prince,"
one of A. A. Milne's delightfuly in-
significant comedies.
Shubert-Lafayette: "My Girl
Friday," a play of loud merriment
about show-girls and business men.-
Olympia: "The Miracle," the Gest-
Reinhardt mediaeval circus with
everything on the grand scale. j
* * I

4--

Billiards for Exercise
Dawn Donuts
The Partner
your Coffee
at Breakfast
Our Bismarks and Raised Donuts at
all the Stores and Restaurants
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Speaks for
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HEAR BOB
MREET CARSON'S MUSIC
Aternoons and venings:
< tic-. o~ c~ o sc~ c « o c .toc-- st

Musi cAnd Drama I Today
HUSTON BROS

MERRILL, LYNCH & CO.
Members
New York Stock Exchange
Chicago Stock Exchange
Cleveland Stock Exchange
Detroit Stock Exchange
New York Curb Market
Accounts Carried on Conservative Margin
201 First Nat'l Bank Phone 4294

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Department Managers
Advertising ............HollisteraMabl :y
Advertising ......Kasper 11. Halverson
Advertising..........."..,...herwood Upton
Service.....................George Spater
Circulation.................J. Vernor Davis
Accounts............ ..... ....Jack Rose
Publications.................George Hamilton
Assistants

Howard W. Baldock
Raymond Campbell
James E. Cartwright
Robert Crawford
Harry B. Culver
Thomas M. Davis
James Hoffer
Norris Johnson
Cullen Kennedy
Charles Kline
Marvin Kobacker
Lawrence Lucey
George Patterson
Norman Eliezer
Anson Hoex

I

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Robert Williamson
Thomas Muir
Charles Sanford
Lee Slayton'
Roger C. Thorpe
William R. Worboys
Jeanette Dale
Bessie V. Egeland
Bernice Glaser wt
Helen E. Musselwhite
lHortense Gooding
Eleanor Walkinshaw
Alice McCully
Dorothy Stonehouse
Dorothea Waterman.
Marie Wellstead

Night Editor-FRANK E. COOPER
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1929

SOUNDER DIPLOMACY
As the time approaches again
for the selection of thirty-two
Ahodes scholars who will study
three years at Oxford and travel
between times in Europe, it is dif-
ficult not to reflect on the rela-
tive superficiality of naval parity,
peace pacts, and leagues of na-
tions. These latter inventions of
suave, suk-hatted, very formal and
coldly calculating diplomats leave
one rather unimpressed with the
true warmth and friendliness of
the signatory nations of people.
Today in the enlightened coun-
tries it is, finally, the feelings of
the people that dictate war or
peace, and hatred we can hardly
imagine springing up between two
peoples who have learned to love
each other's culture, play each
other's games, and know each
other through several centuries of
close association.
History records that boundaries
of hate have vitiated the most sol-
emn treaties concluded by diplo-
matic representatives of the high
contracting powers. The United
States, we are thankful, has not
as yet separated herself from any
part of the world by a wall of mu-
tual hatred, but we are handicap-'
ped by boundaries of water in our
friendships with other great na-
tions, except Canada. Our tour-
ists, of course cross the water by
thousands annually, but they see
Europe as a huge amusement park
and learn to know the people as
one learns to know the ticket-taker
at the ferris wheel.
It must have been with thoughts
like these that Cecil Rhodes con-
ceived his great idea of Oxford
scholarships for American stu-
dents. The opportunity he has
given the elect of young America
to live for a while an English life
and learn at first hand the ways of
continental people must be regard-
ed as a most fundamental and en-
during step toward world peace.
It has gone beneath the glossy shell
of diplomacy and taken root in the

This is what a conscientious sen-
ior did with his car yesterday when
he realized that he had used it for
other than business purposes, thus
violating the permit given him by
the University. "Just as I realized
that I was violating my driving
privilege," he stated, "my steering
wheel broke, I crashed into a pole,;
and the car bounced into the
tree."
- N
Last week Professor Chris An-
themum, of the Botany depart-
ment, discovered that by placing
an ordinary potted plant (Axix
mugfgerg) directly beneath the
Continent of Africa on an artificial
globe the plant will grow tropical
leaves and attract monkeys. Two
days after this announcement the
professor admitted that when he
made this discoveryehe, not the
plant, had been potted. The mon-
keys, he added, were pink.
A large rat recently found a set
of unidentified false teeth near the
Library and has formed the habit
of wearing them when prowling at
night. Yesterday the rat bit a dog,
and reporters, gazing upon the hu-
man teeth marks, remarked that
that was news.
* * *
{ 1?
I
These two co-eds (names un-
known) held an animated conver-
sation in U. hall last Monday after-
noon for twenty-one minutes and
during the entire time not one sin-
gle hurrying student found it nec-
essary to walk around or push
them over. "The secret," smiled
the prettier of the two (although
there wasn't much choice), "is that
we stood off to one side and let'
the people by." Carnegie medals
have been shipped and are expect-
ed any minute now.
* * *
THIS YOU CAN BELIEVE
Just to substantiate the informa-
tion contained in today's feature
story on the University heating
tunnel, below is a photograph
which was taken last night.
.t~ ~ 'r

MACBETH-ON TOUR
We are told that the Mantell-
Hamper company is the only
Shakespearian repertory organiza-
tion touring the country at the i
present time, and that it consists
of players drawn from the Sothern-
Hampden and other defunct com-
panies. Tuesday night's perform-
ante illustrates the sort of produc-
tion one may expect from this type'
of company. The entire burden of
the presentation rested upon the I
none too frail shoulders of Miss
Hamper who will be remembered
as the supporting star of the vet-
eran Mantell_. Miss Hamper hasI
an excellent voice, flexible if not
youthful, which she uses to good
effect, especially in the sleep-walk-j
ing scene. This scene is probably
the high point of the play as it
was presented Tuesday night. Miss
Hamper seems wellnadapted, both
vocally and histronically, to the '
role of Lady Macbeth.
Mr. Alexander, who is listed as
Miss Hamper's co-star, is much less
satisfactory. His performance ofj
the title role was bombastic and
oratorical; his Macbeth, a stage
figure entirely except during the
latter part of the banquet scene.
One misses the Mantell voice and
gesture.
The whole production was un-
even. The action was exceedingly
slow, and there was no illusion of
reality until well into the court-
yard scene. The supporting cast
was mediocre, with the possible ex-
ception of -LeRoi Operti as the
Porter.
The scenery had simplicity to
commend it. The elaborately de-
tailed back-drops and cheese cloth
foliage of past productions were
happily missing. The lighting ef-
fects were somewhat more elabo-
rate than is usual in traveling re-
pertory. Noisy and demonstrative,
the juvenile element of the audi-
ence was boisterous in their appre-
ciation ofthe offering which was
adequate but not inspired.
D. W. S.
ROMEO AND JULIET
A Review, by Robert L. Sloss
"Romeo and Juliet" is ever pop-
ular, but' its production on the
stage today falls short of the peak
it once reached. The Mantell-
Hamper Company, while making
no claims to the heights of Shake-
spearian drama, has presented a
fairly accurate reproduction of the
bard's work without missing all of
the fine points of his art.
One of the main objections, how-
ever, is the fact that Miss Hamper,
in portraying Juliet, a maid of less
than sixteen years, is rather plump
and matronly for the part. The
youthful Romeo, on the other hand,
might easily be her son rather than
her ardent lover, and acts as if
he views the situation in much the
same way. His dramatic out-
bursts were received by the audi-
ence in stoical silence for the most
part, but occasional snickers from
different parts of the theatre at
critical moments were not at all
conducive to increased efforts on
the part of the players.
The .part of Mercutio, taken by
John Alexander, was well acted if
Shakespeare's idea was to impress
the audience with this character's
utter absurdity. His puns -are not,
of course, his own fault, but even
without them, he reminds us of
the average college freshman, "a
gentleman who loves to hear him-
self talk."

The character portrayal on the
whole is poor. The numerous op-
portunities Shakespeare has offer-
ed for contrasts and subtle charac-
terizations are almost completely
overlooked, except in the case of
Friar Laurence, who is undoubted-
ly the outstanding figure in this
romantic tragedy.

1
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Any

Circulating Library
Has been enlarged and
offers the Best Recent
Books.
Also see our New and
Complete Stock of
PLACE CARDS,
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SENIORS
EVERY SENIOR SHOULD KNOW
SHORTHAND AND TYPEWRITING
A knowledge of these subjects is of great personal
value and will open up to you many positions in busi-
ness. A mastery of bookkeeping is also useful.
One or two hours each day or two evenings a
week will enable you to obtain this practical training.
Our location at State and William Streets is close to
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Individual Instruction

Enter any Monday

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MICHIGAN vs PURDUE

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LAFAYETTE, IND.

OCTOBER 12

DAILY AT.
THE DAILY
OFFICE IN
THE PRESS
BUILDING,
OR PHONE

SPECIAL TRAIN
Will leave Ann Arbor 11:00 p. m. (CT)
October 11th, returning from LaFayette
9:15 p. m. October 12th.
PULLMAN SLEEPERS AND DAY COACHES
$8.37 Round Trip ?8.37
Round trip Pullman fares: Lower
$7.50, Upper $6.00, Drawing Room $27.00.
SEE AGENT FOR PARTICULARS
ANN ARBOR RAILROAD

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21214

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Campus Opinion
Contributors are asked to heabrief,
confining themselves to less than 300
words it possible. Anonymous com-
munications will be disregarded. The
names of communicants will, however,
be regardedras confidential, upon re-
quest. Letters published should not be
construed as expressing the editorial
opinion of the Daily.{
EINSTEIN AND RIPLEY CONCUR
To the editor:
How big is a big number? (See
Wednesday's book column). Well,
a number of 39 digits is as big as
the thirty-eighth power of 10, but
saying so doesn't help much. Take
it in two jumps. If the wave-
length of the shortest wave known
to the physicists were multiplied by
10 to the nineteenth, the result
would be a distance comparable
with the radius of the earth. If
the radius of the earth were mul-
tiplied by 10 to the nineteenth, we
would have something far greater
than the diameter which Silber-

Hallowe en
The Time for Parties
Our stock of Dennison's Mal-
lowe'en Party Goods is the best
yet.
Just drop in and let us show
you the delightful assortment
of Invitations, Table Covers,
Napkins, Grotesque Cut-outs,
Nut Cups, Tallies, Party Caps,
and Decorations of all kinds.
To see them will convince you
that your Hallowe'en Party will
be the easiest of all parties to
plan.

Churclis J3rifish Shoes4
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1EFLECTS all the nice-
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are typically English.
A sturdy hand-finished
"CHURCH" Shoe that sug-
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and goad form.

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Also, be sure to get a copy of
the Hallowe'en issue of "Parties"
-a magazine of decorations,
games and refreshments,-it is
now on sale.

F WXG~IIERCOMPANY
ior Then cz~ie S"'nce 164&8

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