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January 20, 1929 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-01-20

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- - .. ... .- .. . _ _ . ' - - - .' - - - - r...

THE MICHIGAN

LIAIEY

UNDAY, JANUARY 20, 1929

Students Scheduled To Attempt First Solo GlidesNext S

unday

,. --

)MBkYO PILOTS WILL TAKE
OVER CONTROLS UNDER
GERMAN GUIDANCE
SAFETY FACTOR IS HIGH
Possibility Of Serious Accident
Piaetically Piecluded tiy
- 4Dsign Of Plane
Gliding by students of the Uni-
versity will b inaugurated at 11
o'clock next Sunday, Jan. 27, when
offieils of the Aro society and its
Glidbr sectisn will essay their first
solo flights in the recently pur-
chased schooling glider, according
to an annourcement last night by
Robert B. Evans, '30, chairman of
the lider section.
These first flights ill be made
under the guidance of expert glider
pilots from Germany loaned to the
section by Gliders, Inc., manufac-
turers of the plane that will be
used. The only instruction, how-
ever, that the student soloists will
have had, will have been gained by
watching the German experts take
the plane aloft, for dual controls
and actual instruction in the air
are rendered impossible by the
plane's limited lifting capacity.
None of the embryo pilots who wil
fly next Sunday have ever handled
airplane controls before.
The plane to be used is the
schooling glider that has been on
exhibition the past wee in the
lobby of the East Engineering
building. In general design it is a
conventional high-wing monoplane
with a wingspread of 34 feet and a
lattice work fuselage. The total
weight of the plane without pilot is
approximately 200 pounds, giving it
a useful load capacity varying up
to 250 pounds depending on the
strength of the wind. The con-
trols consist of a rudder bar andi
"stick," precisely as inmotored
planes.
Ship Will Fly
That the ship Will fly, which
seems to be the chief concern of
the thousand or more students who
inslected it last week, is proven by
the accompanying p h o t o g a p h
which, was snapped during a public
exhibition in December of a sister-
shiplof the glider purchased by the
Aero society. on this occasion,
with a Geiman expert at the con-i
trols' the glider established a flight
duration of several minutes.
The safety factor of the machine
is such, according to the manufac-
turers, that no injury can result to
the pilot no matter how he mis-
handles the controls. The ship is
so designed that should an ama-
teur pilot become confused, it will
come to earth on an even keel if
he simply freez es the controls in
neutral. The worst accident ps-
sible would be a nose-dive into the
ground, in Which case the machine
might turn end over end, but the
pilot would be protected by the
triangular xtension of the f use-
lage above the wingthat would
break the force of the roll, and
probably prevent damage to the
ship itself.
Great. Vlying Stability
Stability in flight is assured by
the high aspect ratio of the wings
-that is, the ratio of the length of
the wings to their breadth. Stabil-
ity increases directly as the aspect
ratio.
WARFARE IS FAILURE
DE[ LANNX DECLARES
Paris Office Director Of League
Says France First To See
Futility Of War
COOPERATION NECESSARY

That France was the first to re-
alize that war does not pay, and
that it took Germany over a hun-
dred years to come to this realiza-
tioh, was the statement made re-
cently by Pierre de Lannux, promi-
nent author and director of the
Paris office of the League of Na-
tions in an ,interview secured
through the courtesy of the Inter-
national Relations club.
In this statement Mr. de Lannux
said that, whereas it took the Ger-
man nation until after 1918 to
understand that warfare does not
pay, the French had come to realize
this fact in 1815 after the end of
Napoleon's failure to absorb Ger-
many. It is, therefore, to the best
interests of Germany that she en-
tered the League of Nations some
time ago.
It is also to the advantage of Eu-
rope to maintain peace throughout
Europe through the machinery of
the League of Nations, he contin-
ued, and this is only to be accom-
plished by the complete elimination
of all selfish interests. "Salvation
of the most- precious European
values cannot be obtained without
France nor without Germany," said
de Lannux. "If, without losing
FranonEnvlish collbhoration. we

DUPLICATE OF AERO CLUB'S GLIDER
IS PHOTOGRAPHED IN FULL FLIGHT
j]
T }K
Schooling or primary Lype glider, a sister-ship of the glider owned
by the Glider section of the Aero society, snapped in flight during a
public demonstration, near Pontiac. "Oscar," test pilot for Gliders, Inc.,
manufacturers of the plane, is at the controls.
Insert: Edward S. Evans, organizer and president of the National
Glider association, who is largely responsible for the popular interest
in gliding that is now sweeping the United States .
In landing the ship is levelled off under side of the fuselage and
by the pilot near the ground and skids to a stop, falling over on one
allowed to skim along until it 'wing when all momentum is lost.
gradually loses flying speed and The flights next Sunday will be
settles down. The stick may be made over a terrain selected by the
pulled back slightly, causing the Glider section to the north of the
plane to stall, when, instead of pan- Huron river at the intersection of
caking, it automatically noses down Geddes road and the River road.
and resumes its glide earthward, The terrain consists of several bare
The ship loses flying speed at ap- knolls from 50 to 75 feet in height
proximately 13 miles an hour. It surrounded by a soft turf that will
then makes contact with the earth cushion landing falls. The glider
on an iron runner fastened to the will be launched with a rubber

cable over the brows of these knolls I V
and allowed. to glide down their s
dopes. t

Designed For Aeginners
The schooling type of plane that
the Glider section has purchased is+
primarily designed for simple glid l
ing by beginners. In this type of
gliding, which is all done with a
ceiling of about 50 :feet, the Embryo
pilot is taught the feel of wind 'cur-
rents and the principles of glider
! control. It is also possible with the
schooling plane Which the glider,
section will use to do simple soar-
ing or riding of upward currents
by which duration, distance, and
altitude records are established.'
Beginners, however, are advised
not to attempt this until they mas-
ter the meteorology of the upward
currents. i
Soaring will naturally follow in
the footsteps of gliding as.,soon as
the local pilots have sufficiently
mastered the idiosyncrasies of
schooling planes. A soarer or rec-
ord-machine is now being designed
for the Glider section by Milton
Stoughton, '29E, technical expert. of
the Glider section committee. The
German soarers, with which dura-
rion records of more than. 15 hours,
distance records of more than 40.
,miles, and altitude records of half
a mile have been established, are
huge bird-like machines with en-
closed fuselages and Wingspreads of
65 feet.
Soarers Use Upward Current
With these ships it is possible for
the pilot to take full advantage of
the rising currents created when a

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wind is deflected upward upon by the Versailles treaty as to power. strides were made on the scientific
striking the base of a hill. By using planes, Germany conceived the side, and incidentally the sporting
these upward currents off succes- idea of studying aeronantical element was discovered: Since then
sive hills a soarer pilot is able to problems through the medium of it has become an integral part of
remain aloft until the hills ;ive motorless gliders. Great forward Germany's aviation scheme.
out, or if he is able to jockey into, _
position above a storm cloud, he illrlfllllllllllll11lUUt11IIIN1I1Itii1l1111IIIrI11t1111iIirIIlII111UIHiIIIi11IlII1l111IlIIIIitIIIIt;.
can use the rising wind-current E
curling over the windward edge of E =
the cloud to stay up as long as he
wishes. Distance is established by C A S S
'the simple expedient of remaining
in close touch with the cloud,
wherever it goes. E
TI-ie wide popular interest that E _
the new sport of gliding is creating E
in this country is evidenced by the. E Lafayette id Wayne Cadillac 1100 :.
' activity of the National Glider as-
sociation in affiliating glider clubs
from coast to coast and in pre- E T-
riuniphani Return Beg: Sund .y, .: . .. 2(
paring manuals of information and E
i instruction to meet a wide demand. E The MESSRS. SCHUBERT present =.
The national association also an-
nounced recently the election of _ The l tiiiDrial Operetta E
S Prof. F. W. Pawlowski, lead of the -Direct from 8 Sensat oral Weeks in Chi'caajo,
Aeronautical engineering depart-
ment,, to the directorate which in- E E
eludes nearly all of the great fig-
ures in American aviation.
It is hoped by Edward S. Evans,. E
Detroit, who was largely instru-
mental in promoting American E E
gliding, that the new sport may at- B E
tain a popularity'
opularity in this country c
lossom, I e-
comparable to, that it enjoys in E
Germany. There it has even per- r Life and Music of Franz Shubert
1 meated the universities and been
adopted as an intercollegiate sport E Everytliirtg New" this Year but the Story and Music
rivalling American football. E
Part of the secret of gliding 's = Popnlax Vices--All 11Tites, $1:00 to X2.50', Sat. Mat., 75e to $2b0,
success in Germany can be attri- E Wed. Mat., Best Seats, i.50
bated to the important relation it E E
bears to motorized flight. Limited llflltl#t11111111f11#i1111411 1111#111111111iilfitlllil ll 11t1111tlltll{Ilt 11t11111t1[ltlliltllllltltl"I

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The Art of the Films

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a Look No Further -here's
the Show You're inNeed .
So Get the Wraps and. Comet'!
You'll See

Four Great Days Starting ithday

NOW
PLAYING

IS NO NAME FOR IT!

The Girl Who: Looked Hot-And Kept Cool!

Colleen as a good little bad
girl, looking for the wicked
way of the Great White
Way. She wanted to be an
actress in the worst way -
and almost succeeded. But
a well - known playwright
signed her to a contract for
life!
~3 r h lo in o lg I' ~ ~ u e

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Filmdom's latest
sensation
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says
[ don't know w h -e t It c r
ou're a Rear or-a Bull
own in Wall Street, but
ixie preferred is one stock
au ca=n't manipulate. The
ere faet that I may bite
au on the ear and think
w're somebody else must
at .00rifuse a sound busi-
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with ANTONIO MORENO
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and marry tht- synddi-
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with, Jack s t a y . at
home * i t h Jinijny;
t0l in* troubles to
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week-ends with
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ON THE STAG E-IN PERSON
The World Famous
F IL- Y
"Real Chips -Off' the Old Block"
IN A
"VARIETY OF FOYIS S"

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