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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 16, 1929 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-01-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

D16,_109 THEMiCHiQAN DET.Y
COMMITTEE FROM YALE PAYS VISIT TO N
en Main Museum Exhibition Room
Folowing on the heels of several tra k of enui rn new w ibrary atand t0

MAIN LIBRARY
kx meansurements of ev-

Uni
PALEONTOLOGY fUP reps
| P LIexi~
GVNPuB --IG xsL I CSHIJ'NINI3
pal(
will
Main Second Floor Room Is Used (fos
For Initial Time Since Build- ver
ing's Dedication hist
the
EXHIBIT IS OPEN DAILY the
life
will
For the first time since the dedi- roox
cation of the University Museum's
building at Washtenaw anid North t
University avenues, main exhibi-
tion room on the second floor of
the building containing paleonto-\
logy exhibits, is open to the public.
Starting this morning at eight
o'clock, and every day from eight
to five an yone may visit this ex-
hibition room, although the entir.,
exhibit is not yet comnpleted.
hExpeditions Bring Material
Most of the material which is on
exhibition on the s wcond floor is
the result of a nuinber of expedi-
tions undertaken by the paleonto-
logy museum under the direct-on
o9 Dr. Ermine C. Case during the
last five or six years. The spedi-
mens recovered are from theup-
per Triassic beds of Western
Texas. The staff has been pe-,
culiarly fortunate in recovering !
the remains of a number of great
Amphibians and Reptiles of this
particular geological region.
The first specimen of impor-
tance that was brought back was
a fairly complete skeleton of an
entirely unknown species of rep-
tile, which has been named by the
paleontology department, Desma-C
tosuchus. Another exhibit of rare
interest is the skull of a giant
Amphibian which is in the .most
perfect condition of any in the
world. The speciman hastbeen
named after Mr. W. H. Buettner,,
the preparateur of the specimens.
It is known as Buettneria.
Find Notable Specimen
In 1927 an expedition from the
paleontology museum to Howard
couny, Texas, discovered the skull
of 'a Phytosaur which is regarded
as the largest and most perfect
speciman of its kind ever found.
This unique exhibit weighs over
450 pounds and the skull is over
four feet long. This remarkable
specimen is on exhibition in a
case with two other very perfect
skulls of Phytosaurs. The exhibi-
tion contains a nearly complete
specimen of a smaller Dinosaur,
and a few bones and teeth of
some of the larger forms.
Professor Case when interview-4
ed about the exhibition said, "We
have here in the museum of the

versity of Michi ;an the. best iagrams with the idea that the vis- so that
resentation of the reptilion life itor may obtain a general idea ofj the foss
the Triassic fossil beds which the gradual evolution of life the ger
sts in any institution, through geologic time." tion."
The second floor of the Mu- "The collections," Professor Case,
m is to be largely occupied by continued, "are also so arranged Subsc
eontological specimens. There i in alcoves that the students in dif- $2.50 th
. also be included pleo-botany ferent courses may be referred to
ssil plants), vertebrate and in- different sections of the exhibition
tebrate fossils, including pre- I for illustrations of different
toric man. The intention of phases of their subject."
arrangement is to illustrate! Professor Case concluded, "The
progress in the evolution of exhibition is far from complete.
, including recent forms. There Much of the installation, labeling,
be placed in the exhibition and charting is yet to be done. But
rm abundant charts and di- enough of the work is completed

visitors may see many of
sils and obtain an idea of
neral plan of the exhibi-
ribe to The Michigan Daily.
e half year-It's worth it.

t vt Q t14.,)& UL C UqJ*&fll pp g * _V
other parties investigating what lYale. erything pertaining to the me-
is universally considered the acme The party was headed by Miss chanics of construction and
of library equipment., a group of Mary Withington, member of the equipping. It is interesting to note
three persons from Yale univer- Yale library staff. There were also that the party began its research
sity visited the main library Mon- in the party architects and engi- at the University library, which is
day. This group is representative neers. The party took photographs internationally known for its mod-
of a committee charged with the of the main features of the library ern equipment.

'i". "..rr. '"~J:,O. . °.1"J.IlJ~l.//.Jlltl~.lJ.,!"l11,./"J.l~./.l1. /+"I ".l~", rrl~./J~° /~ :

ROLAND

HAYES

IN CHORAL UNION SERIES

Friday Evening, Jan. 18th
A Limited Number of Tickets Are
Available at $1.50. $2.00, and $3.00
at
UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Maynard Street

o!
r
E
ii
t

': . * .y k
ther w y t "
to here

s
r

OPENING TODAY

Weeber'

S

German Inn

Always offering real healthsome
home-cooking. We specialize in all
kinds of German meals at reason-
able prices.
Wiener Schnitzel
Omelets and Hamburger
Pig Hocks, Sauerkraut and Spatzen
Steaks and Chops
i{
Weeber's German In
611 WILLIAM STREET
Close to State Street

78 o 000 Chesterfield cigarettes are now sailing
South-Polewards with the Byrd Antarc-
tic Expedition. We are officially informed that the selection
of Chesterfield resulted from the individually expressed
preferences of a majority of the expedition's members.
When it is recalled that these are-in superlative sense
- picked men ... selected not only for bravery, ability
and experience, but also by searching tests of physila1
fitness...we may be forgiven for our considerable pride
in their vote. And somethingof this pride, we believe,
will be shared by all Chesterfield smokers.
It is another of the many proofs piling up that the
surest way to earn popularity is to deserve it!

I

ENRF1E

)

MILD

enou~gh

for anybody. .

and yet.. THEY

SATISFY

LIGG4sET & myERtsi-oJsAcco co.

Mump=

s

H

DON'T FAIL TO ATTEND OUR JANUARY

L1

AR

SA

L

Books

Stationery

Leather Goods

nnawits

AND A GREAT MANY SUPPLIES

L

5060

Novels

AT
89c Each

Box Stationery
FROM
Scto98c

5000
MODERN LIBRARY TITLES
69c per volume 1111 w

No Charges

- No Goods Reserved

No Goods On Approval

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