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January 15, 1929 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-01-15

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tTESDAY, JANTJARY 15, 1929

1 E MiTCHICAN

UNERSTY LETURE
SERIES -WILL PRESE'NT
TVVO SPE[AKERS TODAY
HEREDITY IS SUBJECT OF PRO-
FESSOR BRACHET OF
FRUSSELS
BOTH ARE EXPERTS
IN SPECIAL FIELDS
Samuel M. Kintner To Talk Tonight
On "Research Requirements of
Electrical Companies"
Offering a double bill for today,
the University Lecture series pre-
sents as first speaker, Prof. Albert
Brachet of the University of Brus-
sels, who will speak at 4:15 o'clock
in Natural Science auditorium on
"Heredity. as an Embryological
Process"; while as the second fea-
ture, Mr. Samuel M. Kintner, man-
ager of the research department of
the Westinghouse Electric and,
Manufacturing company, will talk
on "Research Requiremhients of Elec-
trical Companies" at 8 o'clock to-
night in the auditorium of the Nat-
ural Science building.
The first speaker, M. Albert
Brachet of Belgium, an interna-
tional authority on zoology and
professor of anatomy and embryo-
logy at the university of Brussels,
is a visiting professor for the year,
1928-29. He has been brought here
for a lecture tour by the educationi
Foundation of the Commission forI
Relief in Belguim.
As builder of the Arlington radio
station and present vice-president
of the International Radio Tele-
phone company since 1920, Mr.'
Samuel Kintner, also an official of
the Westinghouse electrical con-
cerns, has had as prominent a ca-
reer as any man in his field. Re-
ceiving his degree of electrical en-
gineer from Purdue University in
1894, he was professor-elect of en-
gineering at Western University of
Pa., 1896-1903.
For the next nine years he was
investigator and designer for the
Westinghouse company and general
manager and vice-president of the
National Electric association. Mr.
Kintner is a member of the Amer-
ican Institute of Electrical engi-
neers and of the American Physical
society, being also a fellow in the
Institute of Radio Engineers. I
Mr. Kintner has been brought
here under the joint auspices of the
University and the Detroit-Ann
Arbor section of the A. I. E. E. He
will be entertained at dinner in the
Union at 6:15 o'clock before his
lecture. Faculty members may at-
tend by making reservations with
Prof. A H. Lovell.

A {
r
P
R

SON OF HOOVER
GETS RADIO JOB

Study Italian And Save Money When You

i!

Take That Trip To Europe, Says Napoli

-'if you couf elinpl:tl e a summer Neither the boy nor his father were
ip 0to Europe, study Italia n !" is able to speak Italian, and they
(i1 :,dviae give Uzzivrsity nd were frequently in difficulty when
S h advie givey niversypuner- customers who could not speak
English ent ered the store. Napoli
department of Ronance languages also cited the case of a University
"A good meal costs only a quarter student who studied Italian in
in Italy, and a fine shirt can be connection with selling insurance.
bought for sixty cents, provided one He found that after a year's study
knows enough Italian to deal with he was able to write up a great
rative merchants," he said. !many Italians whom before could
"A trip taken through a tourist's not be approached
agency is very expensive, but by "Since Italian, with the possible
traveling on one's lonesome one exception of German, is the most
may spend x very long vacatMion in largly-spoken foreign language in
Italy for $400. even if he dirinzksthe United States, it is easy to see
why above the average amount of the great, value of a knowledge of3
wine" Napoli continued. "A year the Italian language in modern
of college Italian is sufficient to business,' Napoli explained.
s.r' give one good foundation on which Students who expect to teach
to build up easily a spearing knowl- French or Spanish in college later
edge of Italian," he asserted. on are required to take advanced
There are. in general five groups Italian courses in their graduate
of students among those taking work. The course in Dante includes
Italian, Napoli estimates. One of many of this class, as well as those
t.hese is made of those students who1 who seek through Italian an in-
Herbert Hoover, Jr. have lived in Italy or intend to sight on one of the world's great-
Who will join the services of the visit' there. Another consists of est pieces of literature, lie asserted.
rWestern Air Express, of Los Ai,- those interested in the study of Enrollment in Italian classes has
geles, in the capacity of radio and music; a third, of students ma- approximately doubled in the Uni-;
communication expert. The youth- joring in Romance languages; a versity over last semester, accord-
ful son of the president-elect is ex- fourth, future business men who ing to Napoli. There has been a
pected to assume charge of his new expect to come in contact with greater increase in advanced
duties in the near future. Italians in their life work; and a courses than in beginning courses,
fifth, those who take the subject which indicates an increasing real-
Lai G Sfor its purely cultural value. ization on the part of students of
Latin, kireeK cript"A knowledge of Italian is indis- the importance of Italian, he re-
pelnsable to mfusicians," said Napoli porte
On library Display yesterday. "While Germany claims
some great composers, there is no
question but what all musical
Manuscripts, originals and facsi~ foundations are based on the Ital- A T ty
miles, is the title of the displayi ation ore hn thIsa
plaed n te lbray min orrdoiain language. More than this, a!
placed the library main corridor m knowledge of Italian allows sing- for Desserts
by Ella M. Hymans, curator of thek
rare book room of the main library, lyrics to the innumerable Italian Fresh and Delicious
The choice selections of the dis- !ompositions they sing, and this
play are the original Latin andomo n makes for mre intelli- D a w n u o n u s
Greek manuscripts written on e 7ee
parchment. The library owns about t One of chnicals best Italian ng." Order by Phone
two hundred of these, mostly of aN l dents, he said, is a boy whose
Biblical or ecclesiastical nature. One father runs a hardware store in
of the manuscripts is a thirteenth tie Italian section of Cincinnati.
century edition of the Vulgate in
the Old and New testam ent. ..An.-......_ ....._...... _ ................. ._...............,.
other, of the eleventh century, is
the Acts of Epistles, which is
written on parchment of unusual1 EBE R BA C HI & N C
quality and in large minuscules; it 1 E Df1'A H & SO N i
has illustrations at the beginnings
of the books, the initial letters be-
ing in gold and marginal comments ESTABLISHED 1843
in red.
The notable of the facsimiles is
of the Grimani Breviary, written{
in Flemish style. SCIENTIFIC
The library owns 4,846 pieces of
papyri, which are chiefly Greek LABORATORY SUPPLIES
and of the first century A. D. Many
are fragments of the New Testa-
ment. Two papyri are letters found
wrapped together in a house in 200-202 E. LiBERTY S'I
course of excavation by a Univer
sity of Michigan expedition at
Karanis, in the Fayum, in Novem- __
ber, 1926.

Another "Wow"
DANE
Y doomU

Karl Dane an(d
G;erge K4. Arthur
score a touchdow n
of laughs as prison
football gladiators.
A rip-r 0 a r in g
satire on modern
prison life-purely
a laughing matter!
A bowl in every
foot with the two
Comedy Stars
breaking f o o t ball
records instead of
rocks in a collegi-
ate penitentiary.

"NO SALE"
Pathe Comedy

Shows Daily

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