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December 21, 1928 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-12-21

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21', 1928'

PAL ORFIA, EEBR2,12

014t atr4toatt antig

I

Published every morning except Monday
Suring the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-'
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or.not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
Ished herein.
Entered at the pnstoffice at Ann Arbor,,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post.
waster General.
Subscription by carrier, S4.oo; by mail,
'sffices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
hard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925 ; Buine, .2121,.;
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
KENNETH G. PATRICK
Editor.........................Paul J. Kern
City Editor...............Nelson J. Smith
News Editor.............Richard C. Kurvink
Sports Editor...............Morris Quinn
Women'sEditor............Sylvia S. Stone
-Editor Michigan Weekly... .J. Stewart Hooker
Music and Drama............R. L. Askren
Assistant City Editor...Lawrence R. Klein
Night Editors
Clarence N. Edelson Charles S. Monroe
Joseph E. Ho well Pierce Ro-berg
Donald J. Klinc George E. Simons
George C. Tilley
Reporters
Paul L. Adams C. A. Lewis
Morris Alexander Marian MacDonald
Esther Anderson Henry Merry
C. A. Askren N. S. Pickard
Bertram Askwith Victor Rabinowitz
ouise Behynmer Anne Schell
Arthur Bernstein Rachel Shearer
Seton C. Bovee Robert Silbar
Isabel Charles Howard Simon
L. R. Chubb Robert L. Sloss
Frank E. Cooper Arthur R. Strubel
Helen Domine Edith Thomas
Douglas Edwards Beth Valentine
Valborg Egeland Gurney Williams
Robert J. Feldman Walter Wilds
Marjorie Folmer George E. Wohlgemuth
William Gentry Robert Woodroofe
Lawrence Hartwig Joseph A. Russell
Richard Jung Cadwell Swanson
Charles R Kaufman A. Stewart
Ruth Kelsey Edward L. Warner Jr.
Donald E. Layman Cleland Wyllie
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
EDWARD L. HULSE
AMsistant Manager-RAYMOND WACHTER
AdvertisngDepartment Managerx
Aderisng............... Alex K. Scherer
Advertising..............A. James Jordan
Advertising ............ . Carl W. Hammer
Service...............Herbert E. Varnum
Circulation..............George S. Bradley
Accounts.............Lawrence E. Walkley
Publications...............Ray M. Hofelich
Assistants

Irving Binzer
Donald Blackstone
.Mary Chase'
Jeanette Dale
Vernor Davis
BessierEgeland
Helen Geer
Ann Goldberg
Kasper Halverson
George Hamilton
Agnes Herwig
Walter'

Jack Horwich
Dix Humphrey
Marion Kerr
Lillian Kovinsky
Bernard Larson
Leonard Littlejohn
Hollister Mabley
Jack Rose
Carl F. Schelmm
Sherwood Upton
Marie Wellstead
Yeagley

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1928
Night Editor-GEORGE C. TILLEY
MERRY CHRISTMAS
To those members of the student
body who haves not caught tho
flu, to those, if possible, who have
caught it, to the Health Service that
now gets a hard-earned vacation,
to our landladies-may they sell
out with a profit-, to Sphinx and
their petition for reinstatement, to
the administration, deans, and
faculty of this University, to Pro-
fessor VanTyne and the student
investigation, to Professor Yost
and the Michigan football team,
to the federal liquor men, to the
state auto ban officers, to Gerald
Hoag and the vaudeville profes-
sion, and last but not least, to
those twin butts of our conflicting
predilections, Herbert Hoover and
Alfred Smith, The Daily wishes a
Merry Christmas and a Happy New
Year.
0
HONOR THE GLIDERS j
It should be with a considerablel
measure of pride that the Univer-
sity notes among its manifold
activities an entirely student-sup-
ported endeavor. that is setting the
pace for similar endeavors at New
York University, Dartmouth, Cor-
nell, Texas, Kansas, Utah, and De-
troit University. Reference here is,
made to gliding, the new science
of amateur aviation, that is about
to be introduced on this campus
through the efforts of the Aero-
nautical society and its energetic
glider section committee.
It is peculiarly fitting that glid-
ing should attain its first measure
of nation-wide popular enthusiasm
coincident with the celebration of
Wilbur and Orville Wright's first
flight at Kitty Hawk, the success
of which was (in large measure)
founded on preliminary gliding ex-
periments.
Much as the Wright brothers'
crude but fundamental gliding ex-
periments pointed the way to avia-
tion's future, the present enthusi-
asm that is being accorded gliding
points the way to a stil more useful
future for the airplane as a vehicle
of commerce in both passengers
and freight, an important wing of
the government mail service, a
necessary arm of military and
naval defense, a sport for true
sportsmen, and eventually a fam-
ily conveyance for Sunday rides
and camping tours.
The technical advances that;

Any attempt to secure for our
own aviation these benefits that
Germany has reaped must meet
with approval and support. The
country owes a debt of gratitude
to those whose interest has
brought gliding here, and it should
be an especial point of pride with
the University that her students
-are leading the movement, now
Well under way, to develop an in-
terest in gliding wide and enthusi-'
astic enough to secure substantial
results.
Campus Opinion
Contributors are asked to he brief,
confining themselves to less than 300
words it possible. Anonymous com-
munications will be disregarded. The
names of communicants will, however,
be regarded as confidential, upon re-
quest. Letters published should nt be
construed as expressing the editorial
opinion of the Daily.
POWER OF THE PRESS
To the Staff of The Daily:
.The "power of the press" to help
a community to face intelligently
and sanely conditions that may
arise, or to confuse the situation
and color it with personal feelings
and desires, was forcibly demon-
strated this week by The Michigan
Daily.
It may be that some members of
your staff were truly overconcerned
regarding the health of Michigan
students. However, many things
point definitely to the "playing up"
of "influenza" as an excuse for
adding an extra week to the six-
teen days of vacation scheduled to
begin Friday. Among other things,
facts regarding student health
conditions and general advice
given by members of the Health
Service Staff were printed in part
only. Statements given out by the
Health Service after a health sur-
vey by it of 153 student groups in-
cluding dormitories, fraternities,
sororities, and league houses, a
careful study of all student illness
being cared for through the
Health Service; checking up on the
attendance and proportionate ab-
sences of many of the larger class-
es; etc., were questionec by an
Editorial in your paper Tuesday,
the 18th, by an editorial writer
who seemed to set himself up as
an authority on campus health.
Headlines and editorials were un-
duly alarming.
"Lark" cleverly sized up the sit-
uation, it would seem, in Wednes-
day's Daily. Sone apparently, did
"work harder this week than ever
before to get out of school, also
"The number of lightening-rapid
recoveries from flu Friday night is
going to be something to marvel
at." There is an amusing side but
there is also a serious side to the
whole procedure.
We all like vacations in reason.
Members of the Health Service staff
would have welcomed one this
past week as much as if not more
than any one else concerned. But
recommending unwarranted vaca-
tions is not one of tthe jobs of
the Students' Health Service. One
of its duties, however, is to. protect
students from unnecessary loss of
time during important years given
over to opportunities for the en-
richment of an intensive prepara-
tion for life-years, every week of
which should be of tremendous im-
portance and value to each student,
years which are costing not only
parents, but also the tax payers of
the state a lot of money. How-
i ever, if the welfare of the students
demanded the closing of the Uni-
versity at any time the Students'

Health Service, naturally, because
of its special concern for student
physical welfare, should and would
be the first to recognize the situa-
tion and make such recommenda-
tion to the proper authorities.
The recent situation was care-
fully watched by the Health Serv-
ice. It has kept in touch with
health conditions from the first
indication that epidemics of a
mild form of "influenza" were oc-
curing elsewhere and would prob-
ably appear here as well.
It is true that there have been
many colds among Michigan stu-
dents during the past weeks-there
usually are at this time of the year,
for that matter. There were also
many cases of a mild form of in-
fluenza last week and early this
week. However, the mildness of
the illness (a very diferent mat-
ter from the type prevalent in the
1918 pandemic); the short dura-
tion of the illness when intelligent
precautions and care are taken;
and comparisons of the number ill
at any one time with the number
of students enrolled, did not at any'
time warrant recommending that
tha University be closed.
The highest type of service that
a newspaper can render a commu-
nity in times of epidemics is to co-
operate with the health depart-
ments of these communities in

A

ED LLQ II
11

o.

Music And Drama

v--- C

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ILarh
t fts des
the Teans,
DEter~
flflerr ?
Cbrtrstmas
llappI? 1w
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it

_ .._

"AMERICA"
It would certainly be presump-
tuous to attempt dogmatic criti-
cism of Ernest Bloch's new sym-
phony, "America," from the ver-
sion produced by the orchestra of
the School of Music. The musicians
labored heroically, undoubtedly,
and their efforts were tinged with
the inspiration that comes from
doing something historical in the
musical world, but it is equally cer-
tain that they were not of they
calibre to do justice to Bloch.
"America;" as it emerged, how-
ever, is an extraordinarily skillful
treatment, musically, of certain
phases of American life which it
tried to interpret. Bloch drew his
picture well. Without exception
every bit of it was freighted with
sentiment, and the whole work left
the impression of an emotional ap-
peal. But one hesitates to accept
the interpretation, given in the
third movement, for the phases
pictured. The first movement
pictures the Pilgrim landing, 1620;
the second deals with the Civil war,
closing with a well restrained
pathetic theme which translates
the sentimental philosophy of the
war tragedy. The third movement,
opening in fox-trot time, swings
through a turmoil of jazz rhythms
into aimless cacophony until the
moral sense comes to the rescue
with the hymnal chant of "Ameri-
ca" in which the audience and
chorus join to sing the verse.
The question is one of philoso-
phy. Europeans will enjoy "Ameri-
ca" immensely; Americans will
wonder if 'the eternal verities' of
morality are not more fundamen-
tal than Bloch thinks, and if jazz
is not more nearly an accessory
than a protagonist to Puritanism.
I. Leslie Askren
NEW YORK SHOWS
The, following culled, diagonal-
ly and transversely from theatri-
cal catalogues of one sort or an-
other, represent some of the best
business getters in the metropolis
and promise good entertainment.
COMEDIES AND FARCES
The Front Page, humdinging
melodrama already famous in the
sticks. Newspaper life brushed up
with occasional profanity.
* * *
Holiday, Phillip Barry in his
gayest and wittiest mood, intro-
ducing Stewart Edward White ac-
cording to Phillip Barry.
* * *
Paris, with a drawing popula-
tion of one, Irene Bordoni. Bright
stuff, sophisticated.
DRAMAS
The Age of Innocence, Edith
l Wharton's novel projected, show-
ing not so innocent an age. Kath-
erine Cornell, in shovel hat and
velvets, greets her public.
Congai, Helen Mencken playing
1 a half-caste on the back steps of
Indo-China.
Jarnegan, Jim Tully romanticis-
ing a la Jim Tully about movie
people. Joan Bennet opposite
Daddy-Richard.**

03
I

i

Special Saturday Only

p. "1

DRUGS KODAKS
*Before You
Leave
Come in and Order Your
Christmas Candy.
We will pack and mail it or
SAMPLER deliver for Christmas.
"The most famous box of candy"
$1.5a PundTAKE A BOX HO E
$1.50 a pound-
One Half to Five Pound Boxes
PRESTIGE
"The latest creation"
$2.00 a pound
SALMAGUNDI
"Exquisite assortment of Chocolates"
In a Beautiful Metal Box
Calkins-Fletcher Drug Co.
3 Dependable Stores
WVe have served Michigan and her students for 41 Nears
SODAS CANDY

Z5% on all Boudoir and
DISCOUNT Table Lamps
ERNST BROS. ELECTRIC SHOP
210S 4th Ave.

ill nor rsrem rrrrr _ l

i

I -

Jealousy; just that, between
Bainter and John Halliday.
two-character idea done g
pingly.

Fay
The
grip-

WATCH YOUR STEP!
OEx: "Has Goofus any modern ideas?"
TEx: "Nope; he still wears HARD heels."

* * 4

Macbeth, Gordon Craig expos-
ing the soul of the play on his
scenery. The rest seems unneces-
sary, including Florence Reed.
Mima, Belasco spending $300,000
rehearsal money to show Lenore
Ulric in Hell, according to Ferenc
Molnar.
Wings Over Europe, The The-
atre Guild rustling the wings of
death over a Europe threatened
by atomic energy newly released'
* * *
MUSICAL COMEDIES AND
REVUES
Animal Crackers, four brothers,
Marx; wowing them where they
sit.
* * *
Good Boy, novelty -ruisical stuff,
showing book and lyrics by Oscar
Hammerstein 2d, music by Stroth -;
art, Kalmar and Ruby. A hick
inventor is "it."

EVER notice that the men who horn
into the annuals as"the best dressed
men in college" don't clatter about
the campus with their heels making
a noise like a loose fender?
Smart dressers acknowledge the tend-
ency toward the easy dignity of
rubber heels. Do you wear 'em?
Watch your step!©

and detract from a otiherwise pleas-
ing personality.
Good year Hects wibstahsnd the jolts
of walkin . Good rubbey, they give
and lift and /p.
Bound into the c(.l gk cobbler's
tocla . Say ,Goodyear Wing-
foot Icels. By the time
50 your pipeIs filled and burn-
ur a difthey'renonc
Whm r a difference!

This Year of Crace, as usual.
containing everything but the coal
shovel, but that amusingly. Writ-
'ten and produced by Noel Coward;
also acted, with others. Beatrice
Lillie.
** *

I
f-
-I
a

Noisy heels may raise lob
with your academic standing

I

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