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December 14, 1928 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-12-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TH E

MICHIGAN "DAILY

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1928

-. _ _ _ -- , u

I I EA PII[ TO DEIrScien

tists And Publishers View Machine NE [TSUNDWALL SAYS THERE IS NO NEED
Which Sets Type By Telegraphic Control U BIN NEN DOPEDHAOB.UFOR ALARM IN INFLUENZA EPIDEMIC OD SCOLARSHP
W hchy f* i r ramun r * I _e._ . _-.

~~ NiH MI. VANS OAL
With the receiving o, a long ra-
diogram from Mt. Evans, the sta-
tion of the University Greenland
expedition, Prof. William Herbert
Hobbs of the geology, department,
director of the expeditions, at last
feels assured that communciation
with the winter staff of the expedi-
tion, Schneider and Carlson, will
be maintained through the new
radio operator, Carl Hansen, who'
arrived last Wednesday.
Hansen ,an operator of twelvej
years experience, was procured to
replace Baer who had become ill
with throat trouble and could not
remain at the station for the se-1
vere Greenland winter. Professor
Hobbs believed at first that
Schneider would be able to handle
the radio, but it was decided that
no chances of getting out of touch
with the station should be taken.
Schneider's messages during the
last few weeks have been failing
and much anxiety concerning thef
arrival of Hansen was felt.
The message from Hansen was
very satisfactory.. It told of his
arrival by dog-sled after a trip to
Holsentensborg from |Copenhagen
on the last voyage of the Disko
until spring. Information was re-
Scientists and publishers view the new device for setting type by quested concerning, a proposed trip
telegraph which will enable a -single typist to put into automatic and of Carlson to the wrecked Greater
simultaneous operation, in a thousand widely scattered newspaper Rockford, the plane of Hassell and
plants, as many linotype machines which, it is said, will set type as Cramer which was left in Green-
land after their mishap.
perfectly as if operated by human hands. Photo, in a newspaper office Pressure figures in the radio
at Rochester, N. Y., shows Frank E. Gannett, chain newspaper pub- message seem to indicate most un-
lisher; Sterling Morton, president of the company which developed the usually low pressure conditions but,
machine, and Dr. L. M..Potts, research engineer. the figures came in indistinctly'
and have not as yet been con-
IF -. %raT. . . Ifirmed.

Following many inquiries re- chances of getting Influenza, the
garding the seriousness of the epi- following procedures should be in-
demic of influenza and the possi- stituted:
bility of school being closed, Dr. 1. See to it that you are in the
John Sundwall, director of the di- very best physical condition, suf-
vision of Public Health, issued the ficient sleep, a balanced diet, and
following statement late yesterday: some outdoor exercise daily.
"The Influenza situation at the Avoid acute chilling of the
University of Michigan, today, does body, such as drafts and exposure
not warrant the closing of the to cold weather particularly if the
University. The Health Service toRbod we "heate u t
dat iscopng iththeepidemic, body has been "heated up" 'just
date is coping with the eiei before this acute exposure.
in a satisfactory manner. Whilebp
we have many students that are 3 Avoid, in so far as it is possi-
acutely ill with the disease, there ble, crowds and so on where con-
is no occasion for alarm. During tact infection is most likely to oc-
the past two weeks, more than 500 cur.
students have been the victims of Now a word or two relative to
acute respiratory disease. The epi- the treatment. Remember there is
demic of Influenza appears to have no specific treatment for Influ.-
struck Ann Arbor during the past enza. Should you feel some of the
48 hours. It is, therefore, impossi- "on coming symptoms,"-head-
ble to predict its seriousness. Sev- ache, bodily aches, chills, fever and
eral days must pass before one can so on, go to bed immediately. Call
"size up" the situation relative to the Health Service or your physi-
its seriousness. cian. It is this going to bed early,
Students should take an intelhi- in the course of the disease that
gent attitude towards the disease. offers most to the avoidance of the
Notwithstanding that the epidemic seriousness of it."

WINNERS ANNUUNLLU

Results of the annual election of
American Rhodes scholars just
held in 32 states were recently an-
nounced by President Frank Ayde-
lotte of Swarthmore college, Amer-
ican secretary to the Rhodes trus-
tees.
Under the new regulations in-
stituted ,this year, Rhodes scholars
are appointed for two years with
the option of a third year at an
annual stipend of 400 pounds. In-
tellectual attainments, character,
leadership, and interest in sports
determine the choice.
Scholars just elected will begin
study in October, 1929. Three hun-
dred and ninety-eight candidates,
each selected to represent his col-
lege or university, contested the 32
scholarships this year. None were
elected from Michigan, this being
the year when Michigan is excepted.
PRINCETON-Varsity, the ?mov-
ing picture which has been tout-
ed all over the country as being
representative of Princeton life,
has been objected to so strenu-
ously by the student body here
that a contract to show it at a
local movie house has been can-
celled.

as a whole is relatively mild, it may
prove to be serious and even fatal
iIn some cases. Our only known
method of preventing Influenza is
complete isolation. This is mani-
festly impossible. The next best
possible procedure is to avoid, in
so far at it is possible, exposure
to the infection. Influenza is one
of the most communicable of di-
seases. While we do not know all
the facts as to how it is spread, we
assume that it is largely spread by
direct contact infection. By this
we mean that the disease is passed
from one person to another, direct-
ly by means of the mouth and nose
spray of secretions which is thrown
,out when sneezing, coughing, talk-

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTONf
-In an effort to promote more
friendliness and sociability on the
University of Washington campus
the first annual "Hello Week" was
held here last week.

C;Llections f New Paintngs By Living
Artists Are On Display In Alumni Hal

ing and so on.
In order to

WILL ATTEND MEETING

minimize one's

Showing of the thirty-six paint-
igs, by nineteen living artists of

showing is expected to run high During the Christmas vacationj
since neither time, effort, nor period, two Michigan scientists, Dr.
money has been spared in assem- Carl E. Guthe, associate director
bling this well-balanced collection. of the museum of anthropology,
Included among the artists rep- and Dr. Julian H. Steward, curator
resented is Charles Reiffel who has in the museum of anthropology,
exhibited widely and with great will attend the annual convention
success in this country and in Eu- of the American anthropological
rope, receiving many awards and club in New York, it was an-
the enthusiastic praise of Amer- nounced yesterday.

Detroit Theaters
CASS THEATRE
BEGINNING MONDAY, DEC. 10
Nights $1.00 to $2.50
HAL SKELLY
AND BARBARA STANWYCK
In the Comedy Success Entitled
"BURLESQUE"

ANN
ARBOR'S FINEST
DINING ROOM AND LUNCH
COUNTER 109 South Main St.
Psugar Bowl
FAMOUS FOR
Our Tasty Sandwiches, Salads, Excellent
Fountain Service,
Our Gift Boxes of Fine
HOME MADE CANDIES
Are Now on Sale
For the Holidays.
r

.

by thle owner, Harry C. Bentley, ice's best known critics.
president of the Bentley School of Among the outstanding works of Subscribe to The Michigan Daily,
Accounting and Finance of Boston, artists on display are "In the Hills" $400 a year.
so that the art lovers of this sec- by Reiffel, which won the Normanj
tion may see what the artists of Waite Harris silver medal at the
southern California have accom- Art Institute of Chicago, Edouard[ rRISTMAS GINS
plished. Vysekal's "Costume, Life, and stillP B
The exhibit which opened Wed- Life," Elliot Torrey's "Child on the urr, Patterson
nesday of this week has already Shore" and "Orvieto," and DeWitt ud Co.
attracted considerable attention. Parshall's "Zoraster Peak" and Church at South U
Interest for the balance of the "Marine Laguna."

I

SHUBERT
LAFAYETTE
WM. HODGE
In His Greatest Success
"STRAIGHT THRU THE DOOR"
Nights 50c to $2.50; Thursday
and Saturday Mats. 50c to $1.50

I

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