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December 14, 1928 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-12-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ESTABLISHEDa
1890

Jr

41v
4.11tr 11 4t an

4 aiA

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

Vol. XXXIX. No. 70. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1928

EIGHT PAGES

JUNIOR HOP TICKETS
AVAILABLE FOR LAST
TIEIN SALE TODAYi
PLANS FOR DECORATIONS ARE
COMPLETE AND WORK HAS
BEEN STARTED
WILL SELECT ORCHESTRA
Women To Receive Black Purses
As Favors, While Men Will
Receive Wallets
Tickets for the J-Hop of the class
of 1930, to be given Friday night,
Feb. 8, in the new Intramural
building, will be on sale probably
for the last time today, according
to an announcement made yester-
day by George Bradley, '30, chair-
man of the ticket committee for
the affair. From 2 until 5:30
o'clock this afternoon, tickets will
be available to all classes, junior
preference having been closed last
Friday when the general sale be-
gan.
Applications will be accepted at
the desk from the general student
body, and the programs and invi-
tations for the junior class formal
will be available at a date to be
announced later by the committee.
Receive Favors Samples J
Samples of the favors which will
be given out for 'the party have
arrived, according to Alan Bovard
'30, chairman of the favors com-
mittee. For women there will be
small black purses trimmed in
white, while the men will receive
black imitation trout skin combi-
nation wallets and letter cases.
Both articles will be embossed with
the Michigan seal.
Plans for the decorations have
been completed, and work has been
started on preparing the special
lighting effects, indirect in nature,
which will form a great part of the
modernistic decoratiol scheme.
Five Orchestras Apply
Bids to furnish the J-Hop music
have- been received by the com-
mittee from five well-known or-
chestras from which group it is
expected that two will be chosen
within the next few days. The
latest development was the receipt
of offers from Coon-Sanders or-
chestra, now playing at the Black-
hawk restaurant in Chicago, Abe
Lyman's orchestra, late of the
"Good News" musical comedy com-
pany, Chicago, and Ted Fiorito's
Edgewater Beach hotel orchestra,
also of Chicago.
Previous to this time bids from
Johnny Johnson's Statler Pennsyl-
vanians, of New York, and Don
bestor's orchestra, now playing at
the Hotel Pitt, in Pittsburgh, have
been entertained. The submission
of the additional offers has delay-
ed the final choice longer than was
expected, but the committee be-
lieves that the opportunity of
choosing from a greater number of
applicants will prove advantageous
to the success of the party.
Students Desiring
Auto Permits Must
Apply Before 1929
All students who expect to drive
automobiles during the next seme-
ster should apply for their 1929
permits immediately so that they
may be considered by the officials
before the holiday vacation begins,
according to an announcement

made yesterday by Walter B. Rea,
assistant to the dean of students,
:in charge of automobile adminis-
tration.1
Orders issued some time ago
by chief of Police, Thomas O'Brien,
to the effect that all student owned
and operated cars would be re-
quired to carry Michigan license
plates in 1929 and that a Michi-
gan operator's, license would also

President Of Women's League Declares
Herself In Favor Of Girls' Dormitory,

ENGINEERING SCHOOL
AMMflIUMEQ QU~flIII G

Kreisler Can Sense Typ
Before Beginn

Editor's Note: This is the first of a series
of interviews with women students rgarding
the proposed women's dormitories.
I Mary Julian White, '29, president
of the Women's league, declared
herself definitely in favor of the
new dormitory for women now un-
der construction.
"I believe that dormitories make
for a better all 'round development
than League houses," said Miss
White. "Cliques are bound to form
in the houses, and while women in
dormitories naturally will pick girls
to be their especial friends, they
cannot avoid rubbing elbows with
many others."
Miss White went on to say that
dormitory life promoted interest in
extra-curricular activities which is
lacking in smaller groups. She
PRESENT TENTH RADIO,
PROGRAM OF SERIES
Dr. John Alexander Gives Initial
Talk On Surgical Treatment
Of Tubercular Diseases
,OLDEN'S BAND PLAYS
Stressing the possibility of a
method of treatment, involving
some risk, that is capable of curing
or improving a large percentage of
patients suffering from progressive
chronic tuberculosis of the lungs,
Dr. John Alexander, professor of
surgery and specialist in tuber-
cular diseases, last night delivered
the opening address of the tenth
Michigan Night radio program of
the current series. The program
was broadcast from the new Morris
hall studio through WJR, Detroit.
Dr. Alexander pointed out the
methods employed in the treat-
ment of the disease through sur-
gery and mentioned statistics to
support his statements concerning
its value.
"Exercising the Student Body"
was the title of the talk delivered
by Elmer D. Mitchell, director of
intramural athletics in which he
traced the growth of athletics in
the University and the facilities
which are now available to every
student at Michigan. Mitchell also
spoke of the value of the intra-
mural program and of the scope
which it now enjoys in the recrea-
tional life of the student.
Representing the School of Busi-
ness Administration, Francis E.
Ross, professor of accounting, told
of the oppotrunities open to the
student in this field in his talk en-
titled "The Education and Training
of an Accountant." Professor Ross
also told of the work in the school
to give the student of accounting
a wider view of the economic as
well as the cultural aspects of an
education.
The fourth and concluding talk
of the evening was given by Prof.
Ferdiand N. Menefee, of the engi-
neering, school. - Professor Mene-
fee spoke of the work in research
investigation into constructive ma-
terials, and of the value of this
work to industry today.
The musical portion of the pro-
gram was rendered by Bud Gold-
en's eleven Wolverines presenting
1 a popular program of dance selec-
tions. This orchestra is the reg-
ular orchestra of Granger's Danc-
ing academy, a campus institution
since its founding in 1883.
DOCTORS SAY KING ISM
IN BETTER CONDITION:

made the point that if one woman
in a dormitory were out for some
special activity, that activity inter-
ested all the others, whereas in a;
League house, only a comparative
few know about it.
"Moreover, there is an espirt de
corps in dormitories which cannotE
be fostered in smaller groups," said
Miss White. "The student self-
government which is carried on by
the dormitory womenfosters this.
When a dormitory woman grad-
uates she has many friends, which
will tend toward a much better
alumnae attitude than will be
found in the woman who has con-
fined herself to a few girls with,
whom she has lived in her League
house. Because of this esprit de
corps, dormitories give better sup-
port to the League in observance
of rules," Miss White declared.
Next she mentioned the facts of!
better diet and less expense which
.obtain in dormitories. She be-
lieves that there will be better
service to the residents with less
friction, at the same time that the
League house chaperones will beI
relieved of the impositions of the
women living in their houses.
Lastly, with the building of the
dormitory, the Board of Represen-'
tatives which makes the rules for!
women, will have its membership
cut down to reasonable propor-
tions. "At present, there are 1251
women on the board, which makes
it of unwieldly size."
TWENTY COMPETE FOR,
ANNUAL SPEE1CH PRIZE'
IV lals To Be Awarded To Winners
Is Incentive To Arouse
Further Activity

A1111U I VUL0O OUi!U U LLC "Immediately as I step out on
the platform of any auditorium'
or theater, I sense the type of au-
O E AM dence I have, the probable re-ac-
tions to my playing, and the gen-
eral tone of the gathering," de-
TESTS WILL BEGIN ON JAN. 28 clared Fritz Kreisler, noted violin-
AND CONTINE TWO WEEKS ist, who appeared last night in a
UNTIL .FEB. 7 concert in Hill auditorium, in an
interview.
MUST REPORT CONFLICTS "Somehow or other," hecon-
______tinued, "the audience makes its
Courses Having Lectures And Quiz- knowledge, its backgrounds, and
zes To Have Final At Lecture its sense of beauty known at once,
Hour; Others At First Quiz not only by its responses but also
Hr; hr AQby its general attitude during the
The Colleges of Engineering and concert. Through what senses
Architecture of the University of these qualities are made known to
Michigan announcednyesterday the artist it is hard to say; per-
their schedule of final examina- haps it is a combination of all his
tions for the current semester, the facilities giving him a general im-
first week from Jan. 28, to Feb. 2 pression of the nature of the par-
inclusive; and the second week ticular audience confronting him.j
Feb. 4 to Feb. 7 inclusive. For A musician needs a good listener
courses having both lectures and f just the same as a vibration needs
quizzes, the examination time is the proper receiving instrument in
that of the lecture, while for quizz order to result in the correct in-
courses only, the time is that of the ! terpretation of its nature. The
first quizz. situations are exactly parallel."
All cases of conflicts should be Duscussing the state of music in
reported to Professor J. E. Brier for America, Kreisler averred that,
adjustment, Room 3223 East En- "Music in America is unquestion-
gineering Building. No single ably on the up-grade. People are
course is permitted to give more taking an interest in concerts;
than a four hour examination; and they want to hear-*good music And
to avoid errors or misunderstand- many further their contributions to
ings all instructors should notify the work of good music and better
their students as to time and musical appreciation through ac-
place of the. written exercise. Th c e ue o x m n to s i
The scherule of examinations is i AU i
as follows: all Monday classes at
eight will be examined Wednesday, YIS
Jan. 30, 8-12; all nine o'clock
classes on Tuesday, Jan. 29, 8-12;
all ten o'clock classes on Tuesday, . CONVOCATION
Feb. 5, 8-12; all eleven o'clock
classes on Monday, Jan. 28, 8-12; A
all Monday at one classes on Sat- Speaker Is Professor At Union
urday, Feb. 2, 2-6; all Monday at Seminary And Known For His
two on Wednesday, Feb. 6, 8-12; all Modernistic Beliefs
Monday at three classes, Tuesday,
Feb. 5, 2-6; and all Monday at four HAS BEEN HERE BEFORE
classes on Thursday, Feb. 7, 8-12.
For all classes on Tuesday, those Henry Pitt Van Dusen, modern-
at eight will be examined on Sat- istic professor at Union theological
urday, Feb. 2, 8-12; those at nine seminary, will address the third
examined on Thursday, Jan. 31, and last convocation of the fall
8-12; those at ten on Monday, Jan. series at 11 o'clock Sunday in Hill
28, 2-6; those at eleven on Friday, auditorium.
Feb. 1, 2-6; all classes at one on ti Van Dusen has
Tuesday will be examined on Mon- For some nmeas ne ofsthe o
day, Feb. 4, 8-12; those at two on been known as one of the more
Friday, Feb. 1, 8-12; those at three radical and outspoken men in the
on Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2-6; and all American ministry, attaining at the,
Tuesday at four classes will be ex- time of his ordination several years
amined on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2-6. ago, considerable newspaper fame
The schedule of departmental for his alleged denial of the virgin
examinations is as follows: Draw- birth and other biblical fictions.
ing 2 on *Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2-6; Several of the old line clergymen
E. M. 1 and 2, and C. E. 2 on *Tues- in New York rose in opposition to
day, Jan. 29, 2-6; Shop 2,3 and 4 Van Dusen's ordination, and their
on *Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2-6; M. attempt to keep him out of orders
E. 3 on *Thursday, Jan. 31, 2-6; E. caused a ten-day religion-Hearst
E. 2a on *Monday, Feb. 4, 2-6; and sensation.
Surveying 1 and 4 on *Wednesday, While at Princeton, Van Dusen
Feb. 6, 2-6. refused several invitations to join
All examination days marked clubs, expressing the rather un-
with an asterisk indicates a day orthodox undergraduate opinion
that may be used as an irregular that they were rubbish, and left
examinng period. that institution rather strongly

e Of Audience
ling To Present Concert
tual study of one of the instru-
ments.
"There are, of course, a number
of distractions noticeable in re-
cent years," he stated. "One of
these is radio. It encourages peo-
ple to be lazy about their interest,
in music. They get in the habit of
merely listening, turning on the!
radio, instead of learning the art of
playing some instrument them-
selves. In former days, for ex-
ample, if a rural family wanted
music regularly in the home, it
was necessary for one of the child-
ren to learn to play. On the other
hand, in recent years, numerous
inventions, among which radio is
the foremost, have alleviated that
necessity.
' i
TOLEDO U. BY 45-12'
Wolverines Outplay Visitors For
Entire Game To Pile Up
Large Score
SMALL CROWD PRESENT
Displaying an effective short
pass attack and erecting a close de-
fense, the Michigan Junior Varsity
buried the University of Toledo
basketball five, 45 to 12, last night
at the field house. About 250 spec-
tators were sprinkled through the
stands to watch the tilt.
Coach Courtwright started his
regular B lineup, Weinstein, Down-
ing, Dougal and Myron. Through-
out the first half, this combination
outplayed the visitors, 21 to 7, the
Toledo forwards being unable to
break through for a closeup shot.
Dougal and Weinstein were the
central figures in the Wolverines
offensive each slipping through
three baskets each, although
Dougal connected for a free throw
as well.
The floorwork of ,the invading
five was loose, some rather wild.
passing permitting the Michigan
Cubs to retain possession of the
ball for a considerable part of the
half. Stevens, dusky center, was
the big factor in the Toledo offense
during the first period of play.
At the half a number of the "A"
team reserves were thrust into;the
game. Featured by the basket
tossing of Joe Balsamo, diminua-
tive forward, the Wolverine Junior
quintet ran the score up to 45 to 12,
collecting a total of 24 markers to
but five for Toledo. Walker, To-
ledo guard, made two baskets in a
last minute spurt by Toledo. ,
MICHIGAN (45),-

i

ALLOW WOMEN TO ENTER
Eighteen men and two women
competed in the preliminary try-
outs of the extemporaneous speak-
ing contest which were held yes-
terday by the Oratorical associa-
tion. This number is the largest
which has ever spoken in an ex-
temporaneous contest, from which
seven were selected for the finals,
including six men and one woman.-
Those who will compete for the
prizes are: William Clay, '29D,
Richard Hewitt, '31, Miss Frances
Jennings, '31, Nathan Levy , '31,
Sidney Lochman, '29Ed, Leo Nor-
ville, '30, and Gerald Wright, '30D.
The judges for the contest were
Ormand Drake, '29, Paul Franseth,
'29, and Gerald Andeer, '29, all
members of the Delta Sigma Rho,
honorary forensic society.
As an incentive to further inter-
est in speaking, gold, silver, and
bronze medals are to be awarded
to those students placing first,
second, and third. The speeches
were limited to five minutes in
length and were delivered on thei
various phases of two subjects.+
The first was: Resolved, that the
dormitory system, including both

a
l
s
l
l
i
i
J
L
71

MICHIGAN TEAM LOS
DBTE TO OHIO T RIO
ON KELLOGGQUESTION
INDIANA, OHIO, MICHIGAN TIE;
AWARD EACH AFFIRMATIVE
JUDGE'S DECISION
C 0 N SIDER RESERVATIONS
Hartwig, Kern, Dimond Represent
Negative; All Active In Campus
Forensic Activities
(Special To The Daily)
COLUMBUS, Ohio., Dec. 13-Ohio
State's affirmative debaters de-
feated the Michigan negative team
nere tonight in a debate upon the
subject, Resolved, that the United
States should ratify the Paris Pact
without reservations.
As a result of the debate, Michi-
gan, Indiana, and Ohio State are
tied for the first semester, with
one victory and one defeat apiece
in their section of the Western
conference debating league. In
each debate, the affirmative team
was awarded the judge's decision.
The debate here centered around
the addition of reservations to the
pact, with the Michigan represen-
tatives advocating the desirability
of attaching a Monroe Doctrine
reservation to the pact.
Flays Reservations
The affirmative representatives,
contending for the ratification of
the pact . without reservations,
made their outstanding argument
upon the fact that reservations
would destroy the spirit of the pact
and delay action. The failure- of
their opponents to adequately
answer this argument proved the
chief advantage of the Ohio team.
Prof. R. J. Williams of the de-
partment of speech of DePauw
university, was the single expert
judge. The presiding officer of the
ening was Prof. J. B. Denny cf
Ohio State university.
Are Experienced Debaters
Joseph Nemec, Brooks McCrack-
en, Gail Dennis composed the win-
ning seam while Lawrence Hartwig,
'31, Paul J. Kern, '29, and Stanley
Dimond, Grad., were the members
of the. Michigan team. Both Di-
mond and Hartwig have had pre-
vious Varsity experience. Dimond
was the first affirmative speaker
in the 1927 debate with Ohio State
in Ann Arbor, while Hartwig dis-
tinguished himself as a freshman
by making the Michigan team
which debated Illinois at Ann Ar-
bor last spring.
Dimond is a member of Delta
Sigma Rho, honorary forensic so-
ciety. Both Dimond and Kern are
members of Alpha Nu, debating so-
ciety, while Hartwig is a member
of Adelphi. Kern was a member
of the 1927 Varsity squad and win-
ner of the all-campus extempor-
aneous speaking contest in 1926.
The Michigan team will not leave
Columbus until tomorrow morning,
arriving in Ann Arbor the same
afternoon. Carl G. Brandt, of the
Michigan speech department is
with the men.
Politics On Higher
Level Than In Past
Years, Says Pollock

4

I

PRICE OF 'ENSIAN
TO BE INCREASED

i

.
.I
t1
.I

men and women, should be adopt-i Subscription prices for the 19291
ed by the .University; and, Re- Michiganensian will advance from1
solved, that the League of Nations 1 $4 to $5 after today, according to
has justified the entrance of the J. Franklin Miller, business man-
United States. ager.
The final contest will be held Representatives of the 'Ensian
next Tuesday evening as the fea- staff will be on campus, in front
ture of the annual program of the of the library, in University hallC
joint meeting of the four literary and in Angell hall lobby to re-
societies, Alpha Nu, Portia, Adelphi, ceive subscriptions between 8 and
and Athena. Subjects in the final 5 o'clock today. The 'Ensian busi-
Rad Athena. , ness office will also be open all aft-
--o ernoon for the taking of subscrip-
SENIORS Htions. -
All fraternities which wish to
Any seniors who have not yet secure a free copy of the yearbook
I made appointments with a pho- by securing 15 subscriptions among
I tographer for sittings for their t;heir members will have to turn
pictures must arrange for these those lists in today in order to be
appointiments sometime today. sure of getting their extra copy,
0- - _0according to Miller.
SOPH PROM, FIRST OF CAMPUS SOCIAL]

under the influence of Buchman,
whose short-lived but rather
famous "Buchmanism" movement
gained considerable headway at
Princeton shortly after the war.
"Buchmanism" Was an emotional
sect, opposed to the biblical "On-
anism," and seeking to end sexual
abuses.
After graduating from Princeton,
Van Dusen studied two years at
Edinborough, and then returned
to the Union theological seminary
where he took his D. D. degree.
He spends a good deal of time
traveling between universities and
speaking to student audiences.
Several previous attempts have
been made to .secure him as a con-
vocations speaker, but it has been
impossible to arrange a date. HeI
is, however, known, to Ann Arbor!
for a sermon last year in St. An-
drew's Episcopal church, after
which he met several students for
an informal dinner discussion.
FUNCTIONS,
LY AND MISTLETOE

Weinstein; f ..
Downing, f ...
Dougal, c ....
Lytle ,g......
Engleman, g
Balsamo, f ...
Slagle, f....
Wiener, f ....
Glocheski, c ..
Whittle, g ....
Myron, g ....
Montague, g

G
3
2
3
1
1
6
3
0
0
1
0
0

FT
0
0
1
0
0
2
0
0
0
2
0
0

M
2
0
3
1
1
2
0
0
0
0
1
0

PF
2
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
2
1
0

I

Totals .......20 5 10 8 451
TOLEDO (12)i
G FT M PF TP
Steinberg, f ... 0 0 1 3 0I

i
E
i
{

(By Associa
LONDON, Dec.
bulletins issued
palace today told
jects of King Gec
monarch had sat
stood the shock o
eration. Though
and exhausted, th

TP
6
4
7
2
2
14
6
0
0
4
0
0

ted Press)I
13.-Two brief
at Buckingham
the loyal sub-I
orge that their
isfactorily with-

if
1

Pocotte, f ...... 0 0 0 1 0
Stevens, c ...... 1 0 2 3 2 "American politics are on a much
Rosenburg, g ... 0 1 1 0 1 higher level now than they were 40
Walker, g...... 3 0 1 1 6 and 50 years ago," said Prof.
Graves, f ....... 1 0 0 1 2 James K. Pollock, of the Political
Corson, f ...... 0 0. 0 2 0 Science department in a talk at
Smith, f .......0 1 0 0 1 a studbnt conference yesterday at
Lasley, g....... 0 0 2 1 0 Lane Hall. "What we need now
- - -- -- is more men of independent means
Totals ....... 5 2 6 9 12 and high principles to go into poli-
Score at half: Michigan 21,, tics and we probably will get more
Toledo 7. Referee: Bechtel, Wit- ( of them in the next few decades,"
tenberg. he continued.
Professor Pollock expressed re-
gret that politics are still regarded
by many as a "dirty game" and not
P MG MAK ifit for a self-respecting man: Poli-
tics is not any "rottener" than
business, Professor Pollock stated,
- and in order to make politics bet-
ter, we need better men in it.
(Py Associated Press) Galens Contributions
NEW YORK, Dec. 13.-Collier's -
weekly gave out today for publica- Drive Proves Success
tion its All-American fodtballa-
t:-u le ~tf d b e ul Ri-uwf-Ay

be required, make it necessary that lost ground and
applicants for permission to oper- night even record
ate automobiles secure their li- provement.
censes immediately and submit ap- It was also said
plications for renewal of permits to cial statement tha
the office of the dean of students dition remains so
within the next few days. This morning annoui
in order that University permit I that the pulse wa
plates may be secured by the time In view of the
school reopens in January. the strength of t

f yesterday's op- ! WIL L BE HELD
naturally weak
ie King has not As the first event of the all-
his position to- campus social calendar of the year,
the Sophomore Prom of the class
in the 8:15 offi- of '31 will be held this evening in,
At the local con- the ballroom of the Union. Ar-
atisfactory. The rangements for the formal party
acement stated which have been made by the com-
as steady. mittee during the past month will
extent to which I culminate tonight with the grand
he royal patient march led by Walter Yeagley, '31,
three weeks of general chairman, and Miss Doris
ese reports gave Densmore, '31.
n to the public. Dancing will begin at 9 o'clock
ay pass without and will continue until 1 o'clock. At
evelopment, the I 11 o'clock the grand march will

cago. It will be composed of ten placed in the purses. As refresh-
musicians in addition to the direc- ments, punch will be served
tor. throughout the party.
A limited number of tickets are Christmas decorations--Christ-
still available for the party. They mnas trees, red and green, and mis-
may be secured anytime today at tletoe-are being used to give the
the desk in the main corridor of Union ballroom a more spiritly
Angell Hall, or this afternoon at appearance for the occasion. The
the side desk in the Union lobby. corridor leading to the dance hall
The price is $5. will also be decorated in like man-
Favors are obtainable by ticket I ner.
holders this afternoon at the desk Patrons for the Prom were an-
o__ _- o nounced late yesterday by the com-

TONIGHT AMID HOL

,1

I

University Of
Cancels All

Chicago
Activities

has been tried by
severe illness, th
great gratification
Should another d
any untoward de

Leam , seec e y ran an a nce.
The team includes six players from'
the East, three from the Middle
West, and one each from the South
and Far-West, in addition to which
three utility men are named. j
End-Fesler ..........Ohio State'
Tackle-Getto .........Pittsburgh

At the close of their two-drag
campaign, the Galens yesterday
declared their drive this year to
have been a thorough success, ac-
cording to Bernard Watson, '29M,
chairman of the committee. The
total contributions totalled $1,350,
which amount is greater than

Tickets for the Sophomiore
Prom will be ' available at the
door tonight for all those wish-

mittee. They are: President C. C.
I Little and Mrs. Little, Dean J. A.

|

Bursley and Mrs. Bursley, Dr. R. C.

1!'

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