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December 12, 1928 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-12-12

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THE MICGHIGA N

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SOPHOMORE PROM COMMITTEE MAKES FINAL
PREPARATIONS FOR ANNUAL FPORMIL PARTY

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Advertising Head
To Address Group

PROFESSOR VIBBERT DISCUSSES
TECHNICALITY OF FRENCH STUDY
"In the French universities, the' war, Professor Vibbert stated, the

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E. St. EImo Lewis, advertising Is
authority and lecturer, will ad-

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Favors Consisting Of Small Leather
Purses To Be Distributed
.At Union Today
REOORAMS TO BE TAKEN
Featuring a well-known night
club band with a leader of unusual-
ly wide experience in this field,
the Sophomore Prom, the annual
formal party of the second year
class, and the first big event in
the campus social calendar of the
year, will be held Friday evening
in the Union ballroom.
Favors for the party, to be a
small leather purse in the Michi-I
gan colors-maize and blue, will be
distributed ostarting 1 o'clock to-
morrow afternoon at the side desk
in the lobby of the Union. They
will be securable from 1 to 5 o'clock
each' afternoon at this desk. To
receive the favor, a ticket must be
presented. The regular favor cou-
pon will not be taken at this time,
but the card will be punched to
signify that the holder has received
the favor. Tickets are sold each
afternoon at the Union desk and
in the main corridor of Angell hall.
Arrangements for the party have
practically been completed by the
prom'committee, which is headed
by Walter Yeagley, '31. Christmas
decorations, including several trees,
red and green wreathes, and mis-_
tltoe will be used to give a moe
artistic appearance to the Union
ballroom.
Dancing at the Prom will be
from 9 until 1 o'clock it was an-
nounced yesterday by the commit-
tee. At 11 o'clock a grand march,
lead by Yeagley and his partner
will be held. A block "M" will then
be formed, and the official flash-
light picture will be taken. "Reo-
gram" moving pictures will be
taken of the march, the formation
Cost Of Education
Doubled Since 1900
The cost of a higher education
is twice the price of the same edu-
cation in 1900, and the average
yearly cost of attending college is
$581.00; these two facts are part of
a number of figures collected by
the United States bureau of edu-
cation, after a survey of 1,100 col-
leges throughout the country.
The $581.00 includes everything
spint, tuition fees, books, board
and room, clothing, and entertain-
ment. Of course this figure means
sticiking very close to an establish-
ed budget, and a minimum of the
last item,-entertainment.
Other parts of the investigation
of the bureau include the follow-
ing:
Tuition in public controlled
schools for arts and science courses
average $137.00 for a nine-months
term. Law courses cost about $50.-
00 a year more than the above fig-
ure
The average cost of board and
room amounts to $276.00 for the
college year. The. yearly average
for books and stationary is ap-
proximately $20.00. $36.00 is the
laundry average.The average min-
imum for entertainment is $12.00.
With the above figures it is cer-
tainly hard to discover where all
the money goes to.
Included in the report of the bu-
reau was the following remark,
"Travel should not necessarily add
much to the students expenses.
For with good roads and the varied
means of transportation now avail-
able, an energetic student will find
a way to keep dfown the costs of
travel." This sounds very much
like an advocation of the past time
of hitch-hiking.

" _ ___ - dress students of the school of'
of the M". , Characteristic pic- Business Administration and alle
tures of the function in general others who may be interested, ind
will also be photographed. a speech to be delivered at 4:15
. Refreshments for the party will o'clock tomorrow afternoon inn
be punch, it was also announced room 101 of the Economics build-
yesterday. ing.
Jimmie Green, the director of "Changing Conditions in the t
the night club band that will play Field of Advertising" is the an-
for the Prom, has had a varied nounced subject of Lewis' speech.f
p experience in this field. He start- He will probably dwell on the grow-
ed after a career as pianist and ing tendency toward the use of re-s
saxaphonist on one of the leading search methods as a basis in ad- u
vaudeville circuits of the country, vertising campaigns, according to
in which he played at the Balaban Professor Griffin.
, and katz theaters in Chicago. He Lewis was associated for manyt
then became director of the Blos- years with the 'ampbell Ewaldo
som Heath Entertainers, originally company, a Detroit advertising
of the Blossom Heath Inn, on Long agency. At various times he has
I Island, but which travelled about been a lecturer at Harvard uni-i
the country considerably, gaining versity, the University of Pennsyl- n
nation-wide fame. The band vania, and .Northwestern univer-t
which he is bringing here Friday sity.
night is noted for its performances At present Lewis is a free lance
at the Garden of Allah night club advertising and marketing con-
in Chicago.: It has been called sultant, Professor Griffin said. In it
back four times to the Garden aft- this capacity, he is called into con-s
er its contract had expired. ference by advertising agencies
and even more by companies con-
Campbell Will Not templating extensive advertising
C m l campaigns to advise as to methods
Remain At Harvard of ;marketing and advertising a
given product, or series of products.
Prof. 0. J. Campbell of the Ln> I,"The School of Business Admin-
lish department has been granted istration is very glad to be able
leave by the University to fill a to bring Mr. Lewis to town," said
visiting professorship chair. at Professor Griffin yesterday. "He is
Harvard during the second seme- a nationally known authority in
ster of the present school year. his field and has a reputation as
His work will be in comparative a very able lecturer."
I literature, teaching a course to1 The general public is invited to
graduates in European comedy attend the lecture. There will be
since the Renaissance and a course no admission charge.
to juniors and seniors in the Euro-
I pean novel since Balzac. WASHINGTON, Dec. 11-The
As visiting professor in English, Jones-Dill bill, authorizing the
Professor Campbell will follow secretary of interior to make a sur-
Prof. Charles J. Sisson of the Uni- vey of the Columbia river basin ir-
versity of London, editor of the rigation project was passed with-
"Year Book of English Studies," out a dissenting vote today by the
who has been at Harvard this Senate.
semester.
Spiking rumors to the effect that
he was considering a call to accept
a permanent chair at Harvard, D A N C I N G
Professor Campbell said yesterday
that he had not considered accept- at the
ing such an offer. He will return Ar or
to the University next September. i
Every
WASHINGTON, D.. C.-Funds
totaling nearly $4,000,000 are lent Wednesday and
annually by 282 colleges and uni-
versities to students of character Saturday N ite
and ability to enable them to finish
their college education.
In addition more than 100 agen- Park Plan
cies and foundations maintain in-
dependent loan funds, Walter J.
Greenleaf, associate specialist in Everybody
higher education, Bureau of Edu- Welcome
cation, found in a study of student
loan funds just .completed.
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SFRATERNITIES --SORORITIES
GIVE US A TRIAL ON ALL
YOUR PRINTING NEEDS
Printing That Pleases'
>S
-Th jn l. fbr 6etter impresson
711 N. Univ Ave. Phone 8805 (Over Geo. Moe's)_I
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students' work is regarded as pri- 'licence' (or diploma, which gives to
m.arify technical," said Prof. Clar- its holder the privilege of teach-
ying) could only be obtained in
ence B. Vibbert, of the philosophy specialized subjects. With the ad-
department, speaking on the Uni- vent of the war and many Ameri-
versity of Paris at the bi-monthly can soldiers in France, several new
meeting of the Men's Educational courses in more general subjects
club last night. "Those working were added. It -was found that
there are considered as technicians these were such of an advantage
to be, or future teachers. to the university that they were re-
"The University of Paris," Pro- tamed, so now a 'licence' in an
e UnVibbersweton,"ParsPro-Iacademic curricula may be had, but
fessor Vibbert went on, "knows no wtottepiieeo ecig
such think as a general 'college ed- itout the privilege of teaching.
ucation' in the sense in which that Today, the University of Paris is
term is used in this country, since one of the most international in-
the students' general cultural stitutions in the world. Eleven na-
training is completed in the lisee' d tions have, at present, dormitory
or secondary school." buildings in the "University City"
Professor Vibbert proceeded to among which are numbered the
sketch briefly the history of the United States, Great Britain,
University of Paris from its begin- China, Belgium and other world
ning in the twelfth century A. D. powers.
to its present form and administra- It is expected by the authorities
tion. The university is one of the of the university that 33 nations
oldest in the western world and will be represented there within the
its history is inseparable from the next decade.
intellectual history of France and
scholasticism. Subscribe to The Michigan Daily,
Up until the close of the World 1$4.00 a year.

Wieman, Tapping
Return From Tour
-C
Coach Tad Wieman and T.
Hawley Tapping, field secretary of
the Alumni association returned
this morning from a four-day trip
to meetings of alumni clubs in the
vicinity of the Great Lakes.
They were in Escanaba, Friday
EPORK Sj
I-leaping plates of ju
Sausage sizzling hot a

NEW YORK UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF RETAILING
Service Fellowships
Retailing is an attractive field for college graduates.
Experience in department stores is linked with instruction.
Master of Science in Retailing degree granted upon comple-
tion of one year of graduate work.
Illustrated booklet on request. For further information
write Dr. Norris A. Brisco, Dean, New York University School of
Retailing, Washington Square East, New York City.

r.

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J.3J. MELLON.
Ceneral hEngineer,
Rensselaer. '24

J M.CUNNINGHAM.
Po-werrEutineer,
Colorado School of
-Mines, 22
J. F. KOVALSKY,
Contract A drnstration
w. T. N. S., '24

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CLARENCE LAYNN.
YOU NG ER C O L L E G E M E N CL~EC N
Designing E-naneer
┬░University of
Kansas, .,9
ON RE CE NT W ESTING HOUS E JO BRS

The Largest Hot Strip Mill in the World

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The Michigan Daily,

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op
/┬▒ . Wool
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Where doyoung college menget in a large
industrial. organization? Have they
opportunity to exercise creative talent?
Is individual work recognized?
S QUEEZED between giant
rolls, heated steel bars flatten
to form steel sheets for the bodies
of the automobile┬ž that our mod-
ern hurrying America demands.
So rapidly has this demand

of Middletown, Ohio, recently
found it necessary to install a "hot
strip" mill larger than any before.
Such record-breaking capacity
brought with it a train of new
problems. Electric control had to
be devised to keep the big 3,000
and 4,ooo hp. D. C. motors "in
step" and prevent irregularities
in thickness or quality of the fin-
ished sheets. Huge generators and

grown within the
past few years that
the American Roll-
ing Mill Company,

E A EBUSERS
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