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September 30, 1928 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1928-09-30

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E

THF MTCRICIAN nATT V

.QTTXTna'%r !C+i7+1rtrrvi1A :21WD 42ft 16410

hed every morning except Monday,
the University year by the Board in
of Student ublications.
)e of Western Conference Editorial
ion.
Associated Press is exclusively' en-
the use for republication of all news
es credited to it or not otherwise
in this paper and the local news pub-
erein.
ed at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
n, as second class matter. Special rate
ge granted by Third Assistant Post-
G~eneral.
ription by carrier, $4.o0; by mail,
s: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
reet.
s: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
KENNETH G. PATRICK

or.......................Paul J. Kern
Editor...............Nelson J. Smith
s Editor ... ......Richard C. Kurvink
ts Editor...,.........Morris Quinn
nen's Editor........Sylvia S. Stone
r Michigan Weekly..J.. Stewart Hooker
sic and Drama............R. L. Askren
stant City Editor......Lawrence R. Klein
Night Editors
ence N. Edelson Charles S. Monroe
ph E. Howell Pierce Rosenberg
ald I. Kline George E. Simons
George C. Tilley
Reporters

I,. Adams
i Alexander
r Anderson
Askren
amn Askwith
on Boesche
e Behymer
ir Bernstein
ICharles
Z.Chubb
aCodling
t E. Cooper
Domine
ird Efroymnson
las Edwards
rg Egeland
t J. Feldman
rie Follmer
Fuss
m Gentry
Gillett
ence Hartwig
Jones
rd Jung
es R. Kaufman

Ruth Kelsey
Donald E . Layman
C. A. Lewis
Leon Lyle
Marian MacDonald
Henry Merry
N. .Pickard
William Post
Victor Rabinowitz
John T: Russ
arold Saperstein
Rachel Shearer
Howard Simon
Robert L. Sloss
Arthur R. Strubel
Beth Valentine
Gurney Williams
Walter Wilds
Edward Weinman
Robert Woodroofe
Toseph A. Russell
Cadwell Swanson
A. Stewart
Edward L. Warner
Cleland Wyllie

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
EDWARD L. HULSE
it Manager--RAYMOND WACHTER
Department Managers
sing...........Alex K. Scherer
sing............A. James Jordan
sing...........Carl W. Hammer
.. Herbert E.. Varnum
on........'..'...George S. Bradley
s.Lawrence E. Walkley
t:ons............Ray M. Hofelich

te Vale
r Davis.
iGeer
r Halverson
Herrtew
Hlorwitch

Assistants
George R. Hamilton
Dix'Humphrey
Bernard Larson
Leonard Littlejohn
T. Hollister Mabley
Carl Schemm
Robert Scoville

JNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1928
at Editor-DONALD J. KLINE
1,200 CHEERS AND MORE,
ghty students are all that are
Jed to fill the largest cheering
ion the University has ever had.
'eturn for the vocal efforts and
r support to the football team
is games, the Athletic associa-
offers the best seats in the
ium: those between the forty-
I lines. There will be 1,200
in the 1928 section, making
ar the largest section ever to
nd the games here.
mple subtraction will show
already 1,120 men have taken
ntage of this unusual offer
ein they receive the best
on the field in exchange for
more than the support they
d ordinarily lend. Under-
men, especially freshmen,l
Id realize that during ,their
two years on campus, they
expect hardly more than the
er seats, but that with( the
rng section, they have a.
ce to see the games from thet
est section.
hty seats remain. ,. As soon
ese arefilled, which undoubt-1
they soon will be, the Uni-
ty will have the largest cheer-t
ection in its history. Not only
who have not yet sent forf
but those who have alreadyr
ved their seats, are equally in-v
When the last seat is taken,
Athletic association and thet
nt council committee may
take great pride in the way in :
i they have helped to advanceb
ier innovation toward a Uni-
y tradition.
I
OMEN AND THE LEAGUE p
anization of women's League v
s will begin tomorrow, whenn
>ers of the house organization V.
ittee of the Women's League t
begin visiting each League t
to take charge of house p
ngs, at which will be elected n
ouse officers for the coming h
f
the members of each house s
quired to be present at such ]
:igs, but more than their d,
presence is desired. The p:
n's League, as a self-govern-
association,,gives representa-. o
o every woman on campus R
;h the Board of Representa- s

bility for all house rules rests with
the women themselves, and thid
responsibility can best be'should-
ered by intelligent voting for hous
presidents at the meetings nex
week.
CAMPUS OPINION
Annonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names ofrommnuni-
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidetial upon request. Letter pub.
lished aould not be construed Tex-
pressing the editorial opinion oY The
Daily.
FOOD FOR HYSTERICAL CO-EDS
There appeared in the "Campu
Opinion" of the daily a letter sup.
posedly aimed to answer Presi-
dent Little's stand on the liquo
situation in the university and th(
possibility of calling to his aid the
Federal authorities to investigate
the drinking condition here. While
reading that article it seemed to
me as if the boys down at the Dail
office had put that article in the
wrong column. From all the idioti
and moronic arguments put up ir
that article it would have been just
an ideal column for Toasted Rolls
this morning.
I do not think that there is even
a necessity to answer this young
co-ed's. statements regarding the
prohibition because they are so
obviously false. Whilereading some
of her "wise cracks" one might be
almost assured that she needed
personal attention by her house-
mother.
But to review it briefly we find
first her wild exclamation about
how terrible the poor students are
treated. Just think, all their
RIGHTS are taken away. Now I
should like to ask just what kind
of rights students in this school
expect. When we come here and
pay our tuition we come here as
people who are perfectly willing to
obey any regulation placed upon us
and obey them in an intelligent
way and not like some four-year
old children, who are indignant be-
cause they cannot have their own
way about things. I say, students
have no rights. It is a sad fact
perhaps but nevertherless true. If
students do not want to be put
under restrictions like that of the
auto-ban for instance, all they need
to do is to transfer to some other
school where they can please all
their whims and not be interf erred
with from allasides. Those students
OUGHT TO GET .OUT.
Then Miss R. P. says in her ty-
pical Michigan co-ed manner that
those who drink are breaking the
law, but why enforce it among us
poor underdogs here in the Uni-
versity when there are so many
others to pick on in the outside
world. To think that we men here
in this school have so completely
warped our female-students' minds
that they cannot even see the fals-
ity of that. statement. Well, my
dear beloved "fellow-underdogina,"
do you think that just because our
fathers have the money to send
us to a university that we should
be priviliged to do as we please?
Are we not counted among the mil-
lions who are breaking the pro-
hibition law? Why do you not give
some reasons why we should be so
exempted from any interference on
the part of the law? You did not
and furthermore, you cannot. Some
time in the future we are going
to be part of that thing called so-
iety and by that time we should

have had enough training and
brains to realize that we have ob-
igations to meet and responsibility
to shoulder.
Moreover our friend and fellow-
student goes on to tell us in a per-
ectly dreamy and most unrealistic
nanner of how the prohibition law
was originated. Evidently she must
have a most poetic trend of mind
o be able to make such wonder-
ul fairy tale out of the origin of
ane of the best laws we have ever
had in this country. I do not want
to stop here and tell the origin of
'hat law but if she wants to know
should recommend her to any
rofessor on the campus and he
will have all the material she
seeds. And then she comes out
with that statement which says
;hat for "some unknown reason"
he Americans voted "yes" on the
rohibition law. I suppose she doesj
ot realize for what reason. Well,
ere I shall give her sex credit,
or in this instance her sex did put
omething across which, whether
ir no they knew what they were
oing, was the sanest law ever
assed. 4
All the way through her article,
r rather her tryout for the Toasted;
olls, I thought that there was still
ome inkling of good logic butI

a
S ABOUT BOOKS
e Contributors are asked to be brief,
t confining themselves- to less than 300
words i possible. Anonymous co-in
nunications will be disregarded. The
names of communicants will, however,
be rgearded as confidential, upon re-
quest. Letters published should not be
construed as expressing the editorial
opinion of the Daily.
AN INSTRUCTOR AND A COAL
DEALER
In this age of the alleged atrophy
of the collegiate mind it is particu-
larly significent to run on an opin-
ion or research made by a college
s student which is considered of
enough importance, and authentic
enough, to be quoted as authorita-
r tive in its field.'
e In the winter of 1925 Neil
Staebler, now a local coal vendor,
and Johns S. Diekoff, at present a
member of the rhetoric staff of the
University, conducted an investi-
gation on "Religion at Michigan,"
and published their findings in
The Michigan Chimes. When Prof.
Robert C. Angell of the University
Sociology department compiled his
book, "The Campus" he utilized
the Staebler-Diekoff findings as
material for his deductions. And
in the latest book on the subject of
college life, "Collegiate,"* we find
the figures of these two local men
cited once again, occupying almost
two pages of the book and being
used as an accurate basis for the
I conclusions reached. This utiliza-
tion of the Staebler-Diekhoff find-
ings by experts in the field is ade-
quate proof of their value.
"Collegiate" concerns itself with
a study of morale in twenty three
American colleges and Universities.
It represents the results of inter-
views, questionnaires and studies
by executive authorities. Almost
every phase of college life is
studied and the nature of the ma-
terial enables one to generalize on
the college situation without dan-
ger of being narrow or insufficient.
The authors, wisely enough, have
refrained from generalizations of
their own, and have left it to the
reader to select the subject or sub-
jects in which he is interested and
to inject into the facts a personal
interpretation and viewpoint. The
material, in general, is comprehen-
sive and complete.
*dwardsArtmaIn, Fisher. Published for
The Institute of Social and Religious Research
by Doubleday, Doran and Company, Inc. Al-
readyin print. $4.00.
"WHAT TO WRITE ABOUT?"
Following the excellent trend set
by an earlier book, the editors of
"Further Adventures in Essay
Reading"* have selected both wise-
ly and well-they have produced a
volume which comes as close to
the ideal of the perfect textbook
as anything that we have seen.
Something of the spirit that ani-
mated them in their selection is
apparnt in their foreword. Here
we find the delightful statement.
"This is not primarily a 'literary'
book." And they continue in the
same vein when they say, "The ex-
aggerated literary conventions
which in the past have prevailed
in composition courses have peen
death's-heads at the famine. The
student's aim should be to write
competently and sincerely. To pro-1
duce 'literature' is no part of his
business."
This book places a premium first
on expression, on language, and on
construction, and only latterly on
imaginative flights.
Yet there is nothing of dullness
about this book. Variety in sub-

ject and interest has been one of
the watchwords of the editors. A I
sports writer, a college president
and former president of the United
States, a celebrated humorist, a
college student, a famous preacher,
journalists, critics, scholars, natur-
alists-all have their excellent bits
to contribute to this work.
One has learned to be wary ofe
anthologies; so many of them aret
mere pot pourris of miscellaneousF
and unrelated material. But thist
book has an aim and it fullfills it

properly. It is designed to stimulate
an interest in writing throughh ac-
quainting ,the student with the
power that lies in the written word.
That it succeeds goes without say-
ing. The reputation and sagacity
of the editors is reflected in every
selection.
*Editors-Rankin Morris,Solve, Wells.
Harcourt, Brace and Company. This is al-
ready in print. $2.oo
AN UNINSPIRING MESSIAH
The psychological biography,
stressing the character and emo-
tional nature of a man, rather than
the events of his career, owes its
present popularity to the work of
Emil Ludwig almost more than to
any other writer. Holding forth
more possibilities than any
form of biography and- giving a
greater range for creative work,
this form is yet one which calls
for the greatest genius because,
unless the writer of it has as great
an understanding as the man he is
portraying, he cannot enter into
his subject or give more than a
cardboard portrait.
"The Son of Man"* which has
probably been carried to its pres-
ent sales by Ludwig's reputation,
rather than its own merit, is a!
disappointment, mainly because
the psychological explanation of
the character is unsatisfactory.
One could hardly conceive of Jesus
as ever having felt so completely
what Ludwig pictures him as feel-
ing, and yet make the immense im-
pression which Christ has upon
the world.
Opening the book with a survey
of the political and religious situa-
tion in Jerusalem before the birth
of Christ, Ludwig goes rather care-
fully into the early philosophies of
both the church and the heathen
world. This setting is to build up
his thesis that Christ obtained his
teachings from sources about him,
and popularized them for the sim-
ple folk to whom he preached. The
story of Jesus' childhood, his awak-
ening to the world, and the stirring
desire to become a simple teacher
of the truth without any thought
of a Messianic mission, is the most
splendid portion of the book, and
well worth reading.
It is .Ldwig's interpretation of
his character from this point that
is bew d g. Jesus is apparently
the victin 'of a series of illusions,
rather plosely connected with the
career of John the Baptist, which
graduially f~l him with an arrogant
idea that he is a Saviour of the
world. He performs miracles which
are nothing more than the results
of hypnotic power, knowledge of
medicine greater than the people
possess, or of the faith of those he
cures.
At first he is teacher whose
message is, "The kingdom of God
is within you." But gradually he
becomes embittered as he realizes
that even his disciples do not un-
derstand his teachings. He is
forced to flee from place to place
for fear of the Scribes and Phar-
risees. The people, who had gladly
listened to this preaching of glad
tidings, become frightened as he
grows more obsessed with his mis-
sion as the Son of God. The con-
flict between the Pharisees and
Jesus becomes the theme of the
book.
Christ, the great teacher, is ne-
glected. The trials of his life are
stressed. He is made a fugitive,

filled with uncertainty and sus-
pense; who, in a desperate desire
to be through with it all, finally
goes to Jerusalem. There he has
a brief moment of triumph as he
enters the city, applauded Ny the
multitude, most of whom do not
realize for whom or for what rea-
son they shout praises. Christ has
a second triumph when he expells
the money changers from the tem-
ple, and then, exhausted by his
efforts to decide some plan of ac-
tion, he is slowly entrapped by the
Pharisees and Scribes, and brought
to his death.
There is no grandeur about this
portrait. Even in the garden of
Gethesemane, Christ is one be-
wildered by the course he has fol-
lowed, questioning whether he
should flee once more, and begging
some confirmation from God for
what he has done. His last mo-
nents on the cross are bitter
igony, for none have faith in his
save a thief, and he cries out "My
God, my God, why hast thou for-
aken me?"
One has a feeling that Ludwig
ould have done much with his
>iograhpy had he dealt more
arefully .with his subject for there
ire moments (though few) when
.e does seem to penetrate to the
ssence of Christ's character. His

Children
10 Cents

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.!III iii i 111111111 rII un II 1111111111111111111111111111 111111 1111i11111111 rin
TALK IT OVER with the
"HOME BUILDERS"
s When you are ready to build that new home. When you
wish to select your building site. If you want improved prop-
erty, get in touch with us. You can be sure o effcient and
reliable service.
Ann Arbor Hone, Bulders, Inc.
F. P. Corry, Pres. S. Schultz, V. P. E. H. Smith, Sec.4reas.
250 N. Main St. Phone '7408
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Action - Action - Action
'The Clean Up Man'
featuring
Ted Wells
Additions
Buster Brown Komedy
"Golden Fleece Oddity"
M. G. M. News
A REAL GOOD SHOW
Price Policy

MAT. A
2:00, .AC.

NITE
7:00

.

WAa-1 Y~
FADE V
I GOT P

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You l
aAP or
ATE
3 W Co :::

--v

Y~tOUNGMAN,
YO MAVENM'T
REARD A

I~~~ --to

5CHOOL

*M
t1
.a

CAN'T IF
You KEEP,
ON TALl.
1..1KE YoL)
K1MV~/-
r< /gL

}

I'This Place
is Going
to be crowded when everybody
: finds out how good the food is
Shere." V. F. W. Grad.
5 You'll find it economical to eat
here regularly.

. , j1
4 G ...
Y+ 'C
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DRUG
SODA

THERE'S NO SLEEPING ON THE JOB HERE! OUR POLITE SALESMEN ARE
ALWAYS READY TO RENDER HELPFUL SUGGESTIONS AND
COURTEOUS ATTENDANCE UPON YOUR COMFORT,
HEALTH AND BEAUTY REQUIREMENTS.
SCalkins-Fletcher Drug Co. KODAKS
Three Dependable Stores
S We 'have served Michigan and her students for 41 years. CANDY

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Great News!

HOUSE

MANAGERS

NOTE

Get your Baked
Goods requirements

MEN'
SUITS
CLEANED AND PRESSED

at the

FEDERAL

White Bread
Cream Bread
Milk Bread
Crimp Bread
French Bread
Vienna Bread
Pullman Loaf
Rye Bread, Plain
Rye Bread Caraway

C

cate partf of society. We are sup-
posedly the ones who are now being
trained to take the reins of lead-
ership from the older members of
society as soon as we are old
enough and experienced enough to
do so. If then we are going to rea-
son the way Miss R. P. does we are
surely going to have fine group of
leaders in this country a couple of
decades from now. It seems to me
that we students.ought to get seri-
ous once and realize that we have
just as much responsibility as any
citizen of this country and that
we are expected to obey and re-
spect any law which our govern-
ment passes. In ending this note I
wish to say that even though Miss

CASH AND CARRY

Whole
Bread

Wheat Sandwich

Whole Wheat Crimp Bread
Cracked Wheat Bread
Pppie Seed Bread
Buttermilk Graham with and
withut Raisins

We do but one Quality
work.. ."the best"

Boston Brown Bread

Vegetetic Diabetic Bread

T7 A T) TC,

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