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November 21, 1928 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-11-21

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R 21, 1928

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ry ri

DUNES OFTEN OCCUR
PROFE[SSORSCT

BRITISH WAR PILOT SURPASSES ALL SPEED RECORDS
BY FLYING 319 MILES PER HOUR IN SPECIAL PLANE

UNIVERSITY GEOLOGIST PLANS'
STUDY OF LAKE MICHIGAN
SAND FORMATIONS
RESORT PROPERTY SPOILED
Object Of Investigation Is To Find
Method For Use Of Dunes In
Raising Farm Crops
"Contrary to popular opinion
that dunes are found only in ex-
tremely dry or desert climates,
}great dune formalions are also
characteristic of humid climates;
especially along bodies of water,"
b was the statement of Prof. I. D.
?t Scott of the geology department,
m speaking of the dune forma-
tions of Michigan which he will1
examine during a leave of absence
ifor the next semester granted by
1! the Regents recently.
"Sand along the lakes dries and
'then blows inward from the shore,
away from the water. The most
distinctive dune formations along
the Great Lakes are found near
Lake Michigan, as far north 'as
Manistique. So far, very little sci-
a entific. research from a geological
Sustandpoint has been done with
dthese dunes. The Indiana forma-I
tions have been studied but they
.tell only a part of the story," Pro-,
fessor Scott explained.
Last summer on an expedition'
Professor Scott examined superfi-
cially the whole extent of the
dunes from Indiana to the Upper
Pensisula. He discovered that they
extend in rows about a mile wide
for as much as fifty miles at a
stretch. The dunes occur in great
horseshoe effects with the open
end facing the water, exactly op-

A British war pilot, Flight-Lieu-
tenant. DiArcy Greig, has attained
the highest speed ever recorded by
man in his supermarine Napier
plane at Calshot, Ergland. He
averaged 319 miles per hour in six
test flights. In one flight he reach-
ed a speed of almost 350 miles per
hour. " At left, above, the plane is
being towed to shore after making
the record, and at right, Greig be-
ing greeted by an enthusiastic
throng.
posite from the types whic o!cur
in the desert regions.
"The dunes of Michigan are very
complex," Professor Scott went on,
I "because smaller types have form-
ed on top of the larger ones, and
also because wave action along the
shore has partially destroyed the
typical outlines. A great deal of
examination will be required to
unravel and explain the forma-
tions."
In order to obtain a key to the
situation Professor Scott has stu-
died the dunes farther north. The
dunes in the north are spread far-
ther apart and these could be stu-
died individually. He discovered

that there were two distinct series, Round Table Club
one formed at the time of Lake I
Mippising, (one of the lakes formed To Hear Sharfman
during the glacial period) and an-
other series formed just previous "Public Ownership" will be the
to modern times. subject of Prof. I. L. Sharfman's
Next semester Professor Scott speech before the Round Table
will correlate the dunes of the club, Sunday afternoon, Nov. 25, at
south with the types which he has 3 o'clock,1 in room 204, South Wing.
already worked out. Prof. Sharfman who is head of
A theory of Professor Scott the economics department, is men-
which explains the irregular ty tioned in the most recent Who's
and complexity of the dunes f the Who as an authority on public
i>uthern shores is that the dunes utilities and railroads and is an
are formed during periods when exponent of public ownership of
the shorelines are low and are utilities as expressed by the Demo-
partially destroyed when the water cratic party in the recent presi-
is high. dential campaign. He received his
A practical side to Professor A .B and law degrees at Harvard
Scott's investigations will bean at- and then began to teach economics
tempt to find the most; efficient there. He has served on several

SMITH IS APPOINTED OUEUE'S FAST LOSIN6II
TO NATIONAL CU CLOUAIYI HN
League Investigates Government (By A Press)
Of Cities For Information On J SHANGHAI, Nov. 20.-War has
Civic Management opened on the Chinese of Haitang
-island who persist in wearing
STUDIES POLICE TRAINING queues.
Before the revolution, which be-
Mr. Harold D. Smith, director of gan in 1911, a Chinese without a
the Michigan Municipal league has queue was a rare sight. With the
just returned from a meeting of coming of Republican China, a
jt A etr a nediro m -- a sseetino I queue cam e to be looked upon as
the American Municipal associa- a symbol of the empire and the!
tion at Richmond, Va., where hei long braids of hair were banned.1
was appointed to represent that Queues by the million were chop-
body on the National Fire Waste ped 'off, and not a few heads met
council. The national council is the same fate when the owner ob-s
sponsored by the United States
chamber of commerce for the pur-
pose of reducing fire loss in cities.
Mr. Smith declares the purpose
of the league is to investigate city
governments throughout the coun-
try so that information may be
given cities and towns in this state
concerning .-any problem in city
management.
Contests are held and awards Phone
made to cities which have excelled
in one field or another of municipal 4300
government, and out of five first
places Michigan cities gathered
two within the past year, Grand
Rapids and Freedmont being the
cities to get the prizes.
Upon the return, Mr. Smith stop-
ped at Albany, New York, to study I Just call 4300 an
the new state-wide police training that spot or stain-
system adopted there, which is the
first state to project police train- will return the gar
ing on this scale. cleaned-faultlessly
The post of secretary of the
League was formerly held by
Charles A. Sink, of Ann Arbor, up-E Repairing anc
on whose recommendation the
Board of Regents of the University Michigan TI
and the League passed resolutions
designating the University as the
official depository of the League.
CORNELL-Willing to get upI
earlier for morning classes, the
faculty have voted that the trus- 1
tees be asked to discontinue the
present schedule of day-light sav-Ct
ing time, which was started last
May.

jected too strenuously to losing his
queue.
But Haitang island, a spot of
land off the central China coast,
escaped the wrath of the govern-
ment barbers and for 17 years has
afforded a haven where wearers of
queues could live in comparative
safety. But the Nationalists, al-
though upsetting policies of pre-
decessors right and left, have the
same opinion toward queues. As a
result soldiers have been com-
missioned as barbers and the men
of Haitang have been named their
prey.
The harvest of queues is under
way on Haitang and is scheduled to
continue until there are no more
queues to cut. Thousands of
queues have gone under the shears
and thousands more await the
same fate.

way to cause vegetation to grow on
the dunes to prevent them from
blowing out. At present in the
southern dune areas the sand is
blowing out on property which is
extremely valuable for summer re-
sort purposes.'
SAN FRANCISCO - California'
will meet Stanford in the West
coast's "big game" on Saturday of
this week before an estimated rec-
ord-breaking crowd of more than
80,000 spectators.

boards of investigation for the
Federal government and other na-
tional agencies and has conducted
research into the workings of the
Interstate Commerce Commission.
He has also written several books,
the principal of which are, Railway
Regulation, written in 1915; and
The American Railroad Problem,
written in 1921.
The meeting, although arranged,
by the Round Table club is open to
any interested. Discussion will
follow the talk.

Special
ICE CREAM
MOLDS
of rich Ann Arbor Dairy
ice cream
FOR
THANKSGIVING

..,

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