100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 16, 1928 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-11-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY,

NOVEMBER

+ t 1928

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

PACE FIVE

THE MICIAN DAILYM&

I
,

FIGHTING SOPHS GIVE
EIOR SCARE
Red Jackets Hold Upper Classmen
Until Last Five Minutes;
Koch Leads Play
FROSH BOW TO JUNIORS
A fighting Sophomore team held
the highly-touted Seniors to a 2-1
count in a hockey game replete
with thrills at Palmer field yester-
day afternoon. The rough shod
tactics of the upper-class forward
line was missing in the brilliant de-
fensive play of the younger team.
Time and again the flashy Senior
center forward, Anne Zauer, was
stopped dead after a dash down
the field by Eleanor Koch, who was
a ,veritable thorn n the Senior line.1
The other game of the day ended
i a surprise Junior victory over
the too-confident Freshmen, by the
same margin, 2-1.
, The Seniors scored early in the
second quarter. after a mix-up in
fjont of the Soph goal, Anne shoot-
ing in the marker, but the Red-
j ckets came back strong in the
closing minutes of the half and
Hlelen Domine scored what proved
t! be the only goal for her team.
'he teams sea-sawed up and down
t~ie field in the second half, the1
ball for the most part, dangerously
in front of the Sophomore goal,
and as the minutes flew by it
seemed as though the inspired Red
I ckfield would fight througi to a
tie. Five minutes before the whis-
tle blew, however, the Blue center
fsrward slipped through a hole in
tie secondary defense and slashed
Ter the winning score.
MFor the Sophomores, the honors
here divided between the goal-
kleper and her sprinting right
ing, Margaret Wood, who kept the
niors breathless with her long
cshes down the sidelines. Mar
~ret Eaman showed some clever
ibbling while Frances Jennings
ad Natalie Vincenti were bright
ots in the Senior line up.
aThe . Juniors, inspired by their
(eat. improvement in their last
tWo games, played a steady, con-
ststent gaie to take down their er-
ztic rivals. Dorothy Marshick and
1ptain.Cassidy played their usual
od game and scored the twin
Sals between them, while Mar-
&ret Sibley and Aillene Heilman
boke up' the Freshmen passes with
ionotonous regularity. The Green
ar center half, Esther LaRowe,
was all over the field, saving her
team from being scored on, time
4d again.
SThe tournament will reach its
max next Tuesday afternoon
hen the Seniors will endeavor to
ep their slate clean in a game
th the Freshmen, while the
&phomores will battle for second
place honors with the Juniors.
OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY,-
Students cutting classes for the
last time before or the first time
after a university holiday lose one
hour credit for each class cut.

"YOUTH MOVEMENT" IS EXPLAINED
IN ADDRESS BY DR. DORA WAGNER
Under the auspices of the School birth when these young people
of Education, Dr. Dora Wagner of adopted as their slogan "Return to
Dresden. Saxon, Germany, deliver- Nature." And so the week-end
ed Wednesday in the University hikes were formed as a means of
High School auditorium a talk on returning to nature.
the "Youth Movement" in Ger- Concerning the spread of the
many. Dr. Wagner by her simple movement, Dr. Wagner said, "A
and unaflected manner of presen- group of factory workers rebelled
tation instantly captivated her au- against the monotony of factory
dience. life, and more groups were formed.
On Saturday noon, Dr. Wagner Finally a conference was held at
stated, groups of young boys and I which they determined to accept
girls are seen congregating at rail- Nature as a guide for moulding
road stations ready to go on week- their lives." These young people
end hikes in the mountains. Their gave up habits that were not en-
mode of dress differs from the or- tirely natural, and pledged not co
dinary apparel of the city youth, smoke or drink.
in that the boys wear sandles and At the commemoration of the
short tunics and have thrown over battle of Leipzig in 1913, the first
their shoulders a knapsack and general youth meeting was held at
musical instrument; while the girls which the leaders agreed on a for-
wear dresses of a peculiar design, mulation of aims for the organiza-.
similar in make-up to that worn ,tion. This was the height of the
by the peasant women, of bright German youth movement, for a
color, accompanied by hardy, sen- year later the leaders went 'out
sible shoes. The government calls with their regiments, and few re-
these hikers, "Wandervolk." turned. "For a time it seemed as
The first youth association in if the war was a death-blow to the
date which originated a early as youth movement, but when men
1896, was not a preconceived plan, die, ideas do not die with them, and
but rather grew up spontaneously. the movement lived on," said Dr.
In a high school in Berlin a small Wagner.
group of dissatisfied students pas- To supply the ever-growing need
sively revolted against the German for over-night shelter for hikers,
school system, which gave them no "The German Youth House Asso-
elective privileges, but narrowed ciation," was organized.
them to a general curriculum. Dis- o
content arose not only in the I I SOPHOMORE CIRCUS 1
schools but also in the homes 1I
where there existed a tragical con-11 In order that those who are
flict between the old generation ; making posters for the Sopho-
and the young. The parents could i more Circus may have the
not understand why the boys re- J weekend in which to complete
volted against "the convention of | them, the time has been ex-
modern life; while the boys hated tended I to Monday, Nov. 19.
the city with its material atmos- I All posters must be turned in
phere. So there arose a desire to to Carol Arthur, at Helen J
get out of materialism into Nature. I Newberry residence.
Rousseau's idea receivea a new o o

GLEE CLUB OFFICERS
At the opening meeting of the
year, which was held yesterday
afternoon at the School of Music
by the Freshman Girls' Glee club,
the accompanist, for whom try-
outs were also held, was an-
nounced. Virginia Hutzel, '32, was
the one chosen.
The acting president of the Uni-
versity Girls' Glee club, Esther An-
derson, '30, opened the meeting andI
canducted the election of the offi-
cers who are: President, Pauline
Bower, '32; secretary-treasurer,
Hortense Gooding, '32, and libra-
rian, Janice Gillette, '32.
Miss Thelma Lewis, member of
the faculty of the School of Music,
was formally presented and she of-'
ficially accepted the position of di-
rector of the organization.
Additional names added to the
enrollmentrare: Muriel Easley,
Pauline Gribling, Florence His-
cock, Elizabeth Louden, Pauline
Bone, Marjorie Upson, Laura
Parcells, M. Haynes, Norma;
Brown, Eileen Lautzenhiser, Myrtlej
Bolitho, Erie Weber, Helen Mikan,
Marjorie Patterson, Marionna Pad-
dock, Gladys1 Lowenberg, Dorothy
Seigerlein.
Subscribe for the Michiganensian
now. It costs only $4.00.
Get Acquainted With

LAST DAY TO GET
BANQUET TICKETS I
Hockey banquet tickets are on
sale for the last time today and
may be purchased from either
Marie Hartwig, '29, 5480, or Helen
Wilson, '30, 22249. All women who
have participated in interclass or
intramural hockey activities or who
are interested in, the sport may at-
tend the banquet, which will be
held in the field house Thursday
night.
Although the program has not yet
been completely arranged, certain
customary attractions will be
scheduled, it was announced by
those in charge. These will include
the presentation of the big silver=
cup to the intramural champion-
ship team, and the awarding of
class numerals with crossed hockey
sticks.
The mythical hockey eleven will
alsc be chosen. This all-star team
represents the best players of the
interclass squads. They are chosen
and placed on the mythical team
with no reference to the positions
they play on the field, -but with
emphasis being placed upon their
playing ability.
H for

Seven
Join

New Members
Dancing Society

At a meeting of Orchesis last
night in the Women's Athletic
building, seven new members were
initiated. Try-outs in the form of
regular dancing classes have been
held for all women interested in
dancing, and in the different dis-
cussions and the problems that the
members of Orchesis all have a'
part in. In the holding of these
classes there has been no competi-
tion whatever, as the main purpose
has been merely to set a standard
of the knowledge of dancing.
The new members are Ruth
Brooks, '30, Martha Beohmer, '31
Ed; Mary Louise Beheymer, '31,
Margaret Seely, '31Ed; Genevieve
Coan, '30Ed; Mildred Cassidy, '301
Ed; and Dorothy Marshick. '30Ed..
These try-out dancing classes
will be resumed from 10:30 to 12
o'clock every Saturday after De-1
cember 8, was the announcement1
made by Miss Ione Johnson, faculty
advisor for Orchesis. Every one
interested in the classes is urged to
come out and, although no Physical
Education credit will be given, W.
A. A. points for attendance at 12
consecutive classes will be given.

Society Arranges
Party At Theater
Senior Society has planned a for-
mal theater party tdt the Rae thea-
ter for Monday night, Nov. 19. The
idea was carried out with such
great success last year by the sor-
ority that they decided to try it
again this year. Miss Ethel McCor-
mick has consented to chaperone
the party. Arrangements are made
for an especially good Tom Mix
production to be featured as the
picture for the evening.
Julia Ferguson, '29, has been ap-
pointed chairman of the commit-
tee for the sale of collars this year
for seniors gowns.
a0
' MEMBERS OF W. A. A. I
I Don't forget the meeting C
I and tea from 4 o'clock until f
I until 5:30 this afternoon at
1 the Women's Athletic b'uild- I
I ing. Orchesis will entertain I
I and there will be talks by .
I members of the department' I
of Physical Education. The.j
treasurer will be at the door I
I to receive money from those I
I who have not yet had oppor- I
tunity to pay their dues.
0

VAGGMA( ~4~]

I

I

Schaeberle & Son
MUSIC HOUSE
For Everything in Musical
Instruments and Supplies
Radiola and Atwater-Kent
Radios
110 So. Main St.

Toasted
Sandwiches
Hot Lunches
Thanksgiving
Favors
Refreshments

Finger Wave ........
Shampoo ............
Manicure..........
Frederics Permanent
Prompt, Scientific

.. 75c
.. 75c
.$. 8.50
Attention

Specializing in
Marcel......................75c

Dial 7561

I

KINNEY SHOES
SLIPPERS-HOSIERY-GAITERS

I

Ii

212 So. Main

St.

1110 S. University

Al

'.
t

'I

Enormous
volume of O
business ' ,'
with a big
buying power
enables
Kinney's to
produce real Ak

Here
we have
variety,
style,
and
wonderful
quality
merchandise
at reduced
selling prices.
AA to EEE.

® ..
o... ,.

a '
CO

NOVEMBER

values at
a much
cheaper price.

WOMEN'S Velvet Step-
in Pump. Spike Heel."

I

AT

SALE

WOMEN'S AND MEN'S HIKING BOOTS
$5.98 and $6.98
SILVER PUMPS AT............................... $5.98
MEN'S FULL DRESS OXFORDS.................. $5.98

1 o i
17S.Main St.

--

a

./ ,
Li m1
4k k

0

.,;,
.. .

SPECITAL
To acquaint you with our high
class work in all branches of
Beauty Culture, we are going
to give you $1.50 worth of
work for $1.00 and this ad.
STOD DARD
Hair Shoppe
707 N. University

mwmmmm

"My girl looks great",
said frater Bill,
"And Mine," quoth Dick,
s an awful pill"
But Pete said"They'll both
strut their bangles,
We've fixed the floor
all, up with Spangles.".
jON
WITH
T HE D A NCE
Everyone dances when, the
floor has been prepared with
spangles.. Just pure white

Ready to WearPhone
Second Floor aCk& Co- .hon1=
Now Featuring
BOB EVANS -
UNIFORMS
Straight - - button down the front style. Smart
c lapels - - Greta Garbo collar. Nurse's cloth and
poplin are the materials used. We also have the
Queen Make and Badanes uniforms. Sizes 14 to 46. c
Priced from
12 $1.95 to $5.50
1- -
SMOCKS!
For the artist, the librarian, the laboratorian, the c
12 -
office, the waitress. In colored silk pongee, natural
a-
pongee, broadcloth, silks, rayon, black sateen..=
S We have plain models, trimmed models, and fig-

I , }',
.tr , . +
r ' <
s \;
* :',',
./
r

READY

FOR

IS

OUR STOCK

YOUR

APPROVAL

+
f f .p .^ °
( ,
i '
r.
-,, ,
i ,
?f
,.
f / !{1
}4
.c1 5 }
.,
.
V
C

t__

1__7

i

In every styl
price. Coats

le,

size and

for Street,
and Dress.

Travel,

Sport,

1112

lifibb.
f
R' r

ALL ESPECIALLY PRICED FOR THIS EVENT

/
Cf.
1

$45

- $65

- $85

- $110

I

i

DRESS

EVENT

When Jacobson's has a Dress Event you may rest assured they sold for
more. In these groups you will find real values. Every dress is of the latest
style and they come in all sizes. They are of silk and wool, or combination of
fabrics. Your choice as long as they last.

GROUP I

I SPECIAL REDUCED PRICES

GROUP 2

i,

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan