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November 07, 1928 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-11-07

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VEMBER 7, 1928

THE MICHIGAN

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W&VA - MWvA M

STRONG SENIOR TEAM
WINS fROM JUNIORS
BY SCORE OF 6 TO 2!

SOPHOMORES PLAYED WELL
TO DEFEAT FRESHMEN
IN 4 TO 1 COUNT
TEAMS BAVEIMPROVED
Two Squads Show Stronger Lines
Than A Week Ago And Play
Better Stops
Supported by a fast forward line,
the seniors defeated the juniors, 6
to 2, in the second series in the
interclass hockey tournament yes-
terday afternoon. The whole game
was lively and the seniors worked
up some fine passing. Zauer play-
ed her usual good game, and was
helped out by Strasser, who stop-
ped well, ana Hawins, who played
in the first half of the contest.
Grabrowsky, played inside right for
the juniors, starred on that team.-
The line-up was as follows:
Troester......RW........ Bielby
Hawkins .......IR... Grabrowsky
Zauer......CF.. ...Marshick
Sauborn......IL........Bloom
Strasser......LW......Cassidy
Hartwig ;......RH........ Ohlson
Cooley.......CH........ Sibley
Miller ........L H........ Stahl
Lyons........ RB........Gieb
Smither......LB......Hielman
Mansfield......G....... Muffley
Substitutions: Middlewood for
Mansfield, Vincenti for Hartwig,
Johnson for Hawkins.
Although the sophomores won
from the freshmen 4 to 1, the game
was more evenly matched than the
score would indicate. The sopho-
more line played the best that it
has this season, and the whole
team has pepped up considerably
since its game last week. Wood
carried the ball down the field
well, and Wilson made some nice
stops for the sophomores. Defend-
ing freshman colors, Healy carried
the ball down to the goal line sev-
eral times, but in each case was
unable to make a score. Weiss,
at fullback, added much strength
to the team. The line-up was:
Breaky ........RW........ Wood
Paddock .......IR........Maslen
Healy........CF.......Eaman
Felske .......'..IL.......Domine
Lovy.........LW.........Reed
Millar........RH........ Wilson
LaRowe......CH.. . Quarry
%lsworth ......LIB.......Moore
Blrdzell......RB......Whipple
Weiss... ..LB.......Shaefer
Warner ........G.........Koch
Substitutions: Louden for Bird-
sell, Jahuski for Domine.
Notices
'Continued tryouts for the Fresh-t
Tnen Girls' Glee Club are being held
at 4 o'clock this afternoon in the-
School of Music. All those who re-
4eived cards on Friday but were
iot able to tryout should be pres-
ent this afternoon, as well as any
others who would like to become
members of this club.
Mummers will hold a regular
meeting at .4 o'clock, Thursday, Nov.
8, at the Gamma Phi Beta house.
i The regular meeting of Orchesia
will be held at 7:15 o'clock this eve-F
ping in the Women's Athletic build-f
ing. I

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UNIVERSAL CHILDREN'S BOOK WEEK DF
WILL BE OBSERVED BY BOOKSHOPS [LLUULO
Children's Book Week will be ob-!the entire community takes part [
served the second week in Novem- in this annual book festival, wom-
ber, and will be sponsored by pub- en's clubs, churches, business men's
clubs, parent-teachers associations,
li school teachers and librarians, schools, department stores, book-: Architects Prepare List Of Dedica-
booksellers, and parents. Exhibits stores, libraries, and newspapers all tion Gifts At Request Of Several
will be held all over the country in participating. Their aim is to bring ( Alumnae Groups
libraries, bookstores and schools, all the boys and girls of the city;
and many talks will be given on in touch with the delight of read- NEW ROOM IS DEDICATED
the subject, while thousands of ing and owning books, during Book
posters will be widely distributed. Week, and then to guide their read- In addition to the plans coinci-
The National book week for boys ing and buying throughout the year, dent with the construction of the
and girls which is supported by so that books will become a part Michigan League, the collection of
public libraries, schools, parent- of every child's daily life. Great pledges is being carried on at the
teacher associations, women's clubs, care is expended by the publishers present time at the Alumnae Coun-
churches, scout and campfire on illustrations and typography, ( cil office. It is a point of fact that
groups, bookstores and other or- and boys and girls delight in the there has been money in the bank
ganizations throughout the United format of the new books as well as to pay every contract of construc-
States has grown from a co-opera- their contents. Many reviews of tion and equipment that has come
tive effort begun in 1919. The first new publications and general arti- i due to date.
Children's Book Week committee cles on children's reading appear inI If collections continue through-
was organized by the American Li- magazines at the time of Bookn
brary Association, by the Boy Scouts Week, and the year around. out the campaign at the rate that
of America and the America Book- For the story of most complete stand in the unique position of hay-
sellers' Association with the co-op- and constructive observance of ing constructed and equipped the
eration of several book publishers. Book Week, November 11 to 17, con- Michigan League, representing
Book Week was organized to dra- ducted under the auspices of a practically $1,000,000 without the
matize and intensify national in- woman's club, a first prize of fifty help of one borrowed penny. It is
terest in children's reading. The dollars will be awarded. A second due to this fact, that the commit-
General Federation of Women's prize of twenty-five dollars will also tee has been able to take advantage
Clubs has assumed a leading role be given. The announcement of of discounts on bills.
in the observance each year, the the awards and the results of the The architects are now preparing
National Congress of Parents and contest will be made early in 1929. a list of dedication gifts. This is
Teachers, the National Education The National Committee for Bet- at the request of subscribers in a
Association, the Girl Scouts, the ter Films and the National Board of great many of the alumnae groups
Camp Fire Girls and other national Review have also co-operated in the
groups have also. In many towns promotion of Children's Book Week. outside of Ann Arbor who wish to

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Daily Bulletin of Sportswomen
ALL MAJORS FIND DTDA In
POSITIONS EASILY PEGASU WILL HOLD
Records show that chances for
positions after graduation are fair- m -jJ
ly high for the women students
enrolled in the major school of
physical education. Of the fifteen Members of Pegasus and all other
seniors graduating last June, all women who are interested in horse-
except one, who has definitely back riding will leave Mullison's
chosen to specialize in physiother- Stables on Ann street at 9 o'clock
apy, are definitely placed in educa- Saturday morning for a ride. Any-
tional or municipal work. one who wishes to go with the party
r -- - ic th¢ 3A--r-+-- mis requested to call the stables to

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Spain Is Illiterate; Does Not Believe
In Higher Education Of Women-Mecham

do more for the League anu espe-
cially at its dedication, which will

take place
June

at Commencement in

"Spain is the most illiterate coun-
try in Europe," was the statement
of John L. Mecham, associate pro-
fessor of history, who was in that
country six years ago. "I would say
that seventy-five per cent of the
people cannot read nor write,' he
added.
"At present," he continues, 'Spain
is backward in educational matters,
although she is imprcvin all o
the time. Colleges are not co-edu-
cational there and students from
the upper classes usua'ly are the
only ones who can afford to go."
"The schools for women are
mainly ecclesiastical with nuns as
teachers, and emphasize the social
graces like music end m nnzers and
embroidery. The girls have one ob-
ject which is matrimony, and their
training is to that end. However,
the elementary subjects like gram-
mar and composition are taught,
but they learn nothing technical.
There are no Spanish business
women, for marriage is their one
career, and so there is no need for
their going to college to fit them-
selves for it as American girls do
in this country. Those who can
afford to never do because they
would lose more in their social pos-
ition than they gain financially.
"The family is the dominant fea-
ture of society in Spain. Family
counts there more than money.
There are no equal rights, for mar-
0 0.
I SOPHOMORE WOMEN '
I Women in the Sophomore I
class who have not yet signed
up to take part in the Sopho- I
more Circus and who wish to
I do so, may register with the 1
Stunts committee from 4:30
I till 5:30 o'clock in Barbour !
I gymnasium parlors on Wed-
F nesday, Nov. 7. This will be
f the last oportunity.
o 0

riage simply means the transfer-
ence of the key of the household
from the parents to the husband.
A girl does not go out with her
fiance. She accompanies her par-
ents and meets him occasionally.
The customary European dowry fig-
ures in the marriage transaction.
Girls must always be attended by
a chaperone. After marriage there
is a little more freedom but not
much.
"These remarks apply to Southern!
Spain or Andalusia where I stayed,
and which is the province where
the customs which the world as-
sociates with Spain are prevalent.'
Madrid is much like Paris, but in j
the northern part of Spain there isI
more freedom. Spain has changed 1
much since the war, and probablyI
still more since I was there."
ELECTION DAY IS
MOTIF OF PARTYE
Election campaigns are to fur-t
nish the motif for the decorations1
and entertainment at the League!
party to be held from four to six
o'clock Friday afternoon, Novem-
ber 9, in Sarah Caswell Angell hall,!
the committee announced today.
The entertainment will take the
form of campaigning for one of,
the other of the two candidates,
and the general suspence of elec-
tion day will prevail. And whether
Hoover or Smith wins the election

One room in the building is to
be allocated to the Kalamazoo t
group, due to the fact that, on the
last campaign, it handed in a sum
of $11,000. The Kalamazoo room
will be a small parlor on the sec-
ond flood designated as the distin-
guished guest parlor. This room
will be set aside for private con-
ferences of district visitors, such as
presidents of colleges, deans ofE
women, and other high administra-
tion officials. When it is not in
use for any special purpose, it is,
of course, at the disposal of the
young women of the campus. It is
to be named in honor of Caroline
Hubbard Kleinstuck, one of the old-
est living graduates of Michigan
and the sixth largest giver to the
League fund. The room will also'
be dedicated to the memory of
Maud M. Cutting, who was for many
years president of the Kalamazoo
group. Mrs. Cutting died in June,
1928.
Two new articles are being intro-
duced this week among the alumnae
groups throughout the country,
telephone covers and oilcloth hold-(.
ers. In Ann Arbor, these will be
offered for sale at the Bazaar.
Subscribe to The Michigan Daily,
$4.00 per year. It's worth it!
Personal
CHRISTMAS CARDS
Engraved-Printed
Order Now Save Money

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