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November 07, 1928 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1928-11-07

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THE M

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1928

ICHIGAN DAILY

THE M... .H.GA...DAILY....DNESDAY...NOVEMBER .7...1928

I -

Published every morning except Monday
ring the University year by the Board in
ntrol of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
sociation.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
led to the use for republication of all news
patches credited to it or not otherwise
edited in this paper and the local news pub-
bed herein.
Entered at the pnstoffice at Ann Arbor,
ichigan, as second class matter. Special rate
postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
aster General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.oo; b mail,.
ffices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
ird Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Busines, sx ..
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
KENNETH G. PATRICK
itor..................... Paul J. Kern
ty Editor.. .......Nelson J. Smith
ws Editor............Richard C. Kurvink
,rts Editor...............Morris Quinn
'omen's Editor.... ......Sylvia S. Stone
iter Michigan Weekly.. J. Stewart Hooker
[usic and Drama............ R. L. Askren
sistant City Editor......Lawrence R. Klein
Night Editors
arence N. Edelson Charles S.Monroe
seph E. Howell Pierce Ro mberg
onald J Kliiic George E. Simons
George C. Tilley
Reporters

ul I Adams
,r ki exander
the Anderscon
A. Askren
tram Askwith
wise Behymer
hur Bernstein
on C. Bovee
hel Charles
R. Chubt
nkt F. Cc.i,-
en Domitw
ugas Edward.
lborg Rveland
ber J. eldnm-
Ione Eri lime
iiarn Geir~
wrence Hartwtut
-hard Jung
ries R_ K"mtltai.
th Kelsey
maid E. Layman

C. A. Lewis
Marian MacDonald
Henry Merry
N. S. Picktard.
Victor Rabinowitz
Anne Schell
Rachel Shearer
Robert .Silbar
Howard Simon
Robert L. Sloss
Arthur R. Strube!
Edith Thomas
BetbValentine
Gurney Williams
Walter Wilds
George E. Wohlgemuth
Robert Woodroofe
[oeph A. Russell
C'adwell Swanson
A. Stewart
Edward L. Warner Jr.
Cleland Wyllie

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
EDWARD L. HULSE
Assistant Manager-RAYMOND WACHTER
Department Managers
Advertising.. ............. .Alex K. Scherer
Advertising................ A. James Jordan
Advertising......... .. Carl W. Hammer
Service.......... ..H..Ilerbert E. Varnum
Circulation...............George S. Bradley
Accounts..........Lawrence E. Walkley
Publications ...............Ray M. Hofelieh
Assistants

ving Binzer
onald Blackstone
[ary Chase
anette Dale
ernor Davis
essic Egeland
elen Geer
nn Goldberg
asper Halverson
orge Hamilton
gnes Herwig
Walter

Jack Horwich
Dix Humphrey
Marion Kerr
Lillian Kovinsky
Bernard Larson
Leonard Littlejohn
Hollister Mabley
Jack Rbse"
Carl F. Schemm
Sherwood Upton
Marie Wellstead
Yeagley

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1928
Night Editor-GEORGE C. TILLEY
THE BURTON CAMPANILE
Following the appointment of an
organization committee, plans for
securing the funds necessary to
purchase the carillons for the Bur-
ton Memorial Campanile are ex-
pected to go forward rapidly during
the next few weeks. The organiza-
tion committee was named from
members of the classes '21 to '28,
inclusive. These are the classes
which were members of the Uni-
versity during some portion of the
time that Marion LeRoy Burton
was president. The Burton memor-
ial proper is to be erected by the
University of Michigan club of Ann
Arbor,
Fifty-three bells, costing between
sixty and eighty thousand dollars,
will compose the carillon. As an
inducement to other classes to par-
ticipate in the campaign for funds,
recognition will be given to all in
suitable inscriptions which will be
cast on each bell.
The Burton Memorial Campanile
has as its purpose the erecting of
a fitting tribute upon the campus
to the man who in four short but
difficult years as president of the
University was responsible for an
extended and comprehensive build-
ing program to say nothing of sig-
nificant accomplishments in the
field of his administrative and
academic duties.
The fine spirit in which the var-
ious groups have made plans to
assist in the realization of this
memorial is indeed worthy of rec-
ognition. It is unfortunate, of
course, that three and a half years
should have passed since Dr. Bur-
ton's death with the plan still little
more than definitely formulated.
As now outlined, however, the
project is an excellent one. The
present chimes and the building
which houses them are at best un-
sightly and need to be replaced. A
new building will lend an air of
distinction to the campus that
would be a credit to any University.
That it can be recognized as a
memorial to one of Michigan's most
outstanding presidents is especially
to be commended.
1 C' mai { Mrirn

Daily concerning the so-called spy
system over the instructors of the
University, and I feel called upon
to express myself. The professor's
main thesis, as I understand it, is
that such a system would not be
countenanced long by good instruc-
tors and, he says, in this connec-
tion, that the University would be
deprived of all the young men who
were "above the high school peda-
gouge type-the kind, to use your
editorial phrase, 'who prefer work
with student personalities to recon-
dite problems of literary and sci-
entific investigation.'" Just what
Professor Van Tyne had in mind
when he visions the high school
pedagouge type, I do not know, but
I am afraid that his opinion of the
high school teacher is not so com-
plimentary as my old uncle's opin-
ion of the college teacher. This
uncle was a confectioner. One day
he was using language, more ex-
pressive than elegant, in condem-
nation of one of his workmen. His
sister remonstrated with him, and
suggested that he hire better men.
He looked at her disgustedly and
exclaimed, "H--! sister, I can't
hire a college professor to pound
ice." Perhaps the movement on
the part of the student to check up
on the faculty has been given im-
petus by the fact that they see in
their instructors in the University,
a sharp contrast to their former
high school teachers who not only
could develop friendly relations
with their pupils, but could also
work their students hard, and did
feel a responsibility in fitting them
for the big game-of life. Knowing
boys and girls of college age, I
merely hazard this explanation,
however.
But to get to the main point,
much can be said in support of the
idea that a. great many students
hold but feel diffident about ex-
pressing, that there is great room
for improvement in the personnel
of the teaching staff of the Uni-
versity, especially among those who
have not yet "arrived." I do not
think that the students have pro-
posed their scheme just to give
themselves the opportunity to
"knock" their instructors. The re-
port of these students, as I under-
stand it, would be only an expres-
sion of student opinion, and would
not, in any way, be placing any
obligation on the head of a depart-
ment either to retain or to dismiss
an instructor. Some of us think
that the head of a departmnent
might actually welcome a little
more light and a little less hearsay
on the question of how well a
teacher is "getting things across" to
his students-from the students
themselves. The plan would not be
in the nature of a referendum. The
mob would not, be voting, but
rather a picked group of serious
minded upper class students, who,
after all the asperions cast upon
them by us, their elders, are about
the hardest group of people in the
world to fool.
I have talked with numbers of
college freshmen and sophomores,
over a period of ten years, when
they have come back to talk over
their campus problems, and with
scarcely a single exception they
have complained of the lack of
teaching they have received in one
or more of their courses in the Uni-
versity. They are not stupid, and
they unerringly condemn the young
instructor who tries to cover up his

lack of preparation, or knowledge,
or of experience, either by the
assignment of impossible tasks, or
by a system of grading that pre-
cludes any mark higher than a "C,"'
or even what they call "hot-airing."
Professor Van Tyne may be en-
tirely right in declaring that the
instructors' resentment to such ac-
tion will defeat the purpose of the
scheme, but many of us are with
the students in thinking that some
searching reform that looks to-
ward the improvement of the in-
struction in at least the first years
of the University is necessary.
E. D. P.
A High School Teacher.
* * *
AN EXPLANATION
To the Editor:
We wish to announce to our
public, lest they think otherwise
as a result of reading yesterday
morning's column, that Rolls is all
for Smith. The poem which ap-
peared yesterday came from our
hands chaste and untainted with
the vile interspersions of "Hoover
for President" lines. Some over-
zealous Hoover enthusiasts inserted
the lines and the captions over the

ROLLS
.THE
GREAT
ALFRED
When American balloted yesterday
To choose between Hoover and
Smith,
We hope they showed enough good
sense
To explode the Republican myth.
* * ,*
For good Republicans think, you
know,
That God, with infinite charity,
Moved on the earth and made their
machine
To consecrate prosperity.
And pot-bellied barons of bigger
business,
Bloated with fortunes gigantic,
Squeezed on their graft by
Democracy
Shout that we're gripped by a
panic.
REPUBLICANS CONTINUE'
SEARCH FOR HOOVER

Music And Drama
PLAY PRODUCTION
EXPERIMENTS
Play Production's announcement
of Rachel Crothers' "The Little
Journey" should be accompanied by
a notice to the general effect that
this play is in the nature of a lab-
oratory experiment. It represents!
Director Windt's quest through the
enrollment of his classes to dis-
cover and identify the types of dra-,
matic ability to be found there, and
the mounting of the play is evi-
dence of the ability of students in=
the technical classes when work-'
ing under the handicaps of depart-:
mental poverty.
One of the immediate features
of the production is the immense
improvement in the general ap-
pearance of University Hall Audi-j
torium. Once God's gift to the
world of Victorian forensics, it isI
at present one of those ghastly ana-
chronisms whiph survive as mem-
orials to State Legislatures and
such things. But the improve-
ments, although of a typically
stagey character, are an immense
improvement, and with the already
promised -accessories of incident-'
music and floral decorations should
provide quite a pleasant surround-
ing for the Thursday and Friday
night performances.

Get Acquainted With
Schaeberle & Son
MUSIC HOUSE
For Everything in Musical
Instruments and Supplies
Radiola and Atwater-Kent
Radios
110 So. Main St.
Et
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BUDDY GO LDEN
and
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at

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toacw
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Two Hours of Enjoyment--Plus!
May be expected by everybody attending the

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ancingEver
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Republican Nominee
pleasantly surprises his friends
who are atempting to rescue him
from beneath Democratic landslide.
While millions of farmers forced to
the city
In a homeless and bankrupt
procession,
With Republicans steering the ship
of state
Is just a normal depression.
* * *
Yet plenty of people seem to think
That Republican leaders deserve
To be called prosperity's guardians
Though they fought the Federal
Reserve.
* * *
Another thing we like to see
Is Hoover's righteous merriment
When people die of poison rum
For his great and noble experiment.
* * *
We're for Smith and state-sold
goods
And the wholesome liquor breath-
For the day when a man must drink
for years
To drink himself to death
* * *
In seven long years not a G. O. P.
whisper
Has been heard against Teapot
Dome,
But they've poisoned the South
with a whisper campaign
'Gainst the party of Rum and
Rome.
* * *
CURTIS LAUDS SHAPE
OF HOOVER'S HEAD
IOWA EAU-r'

R. L. A.
* * *
"PARIS BOUND"
Beginning Sunday night of next
week the Cass Theater offers Philip
Barry's New York success "Paris
Bound."
Madge Kennedy will head the or-
iginal New York cast which Arthur
Hopkins is sending, and the talents,
of this diminutive star should
make the Barry piece of highly
moral fooling very entertaining
for Detroit audiences. The story
revolves about the love of a young
married couple. Life goes on the
rocks when "hubby" becomes indis-
creet, and the poor little wife goes
into great emotional excitement.
The only difficulty is that the tra-
vail of soul which the wife suffers
leads her, more or less in pursuit
of an antidote while on her way to
Paris divorce courts, to succumb
to a similar peccadillo-ergo, she
really can't blame poor Jim. Men
seem to have been born unfaithful
anyhow.
Out of this theme Philip Barry,
who is remembered locally for the
production of his Harvard Prize
Play, "You And I," has woven a
very bright little comedy of situa-
tion and character, carried along
speedily and brilliantly by his
power for writing amusing dia-
logue.
The New York success of the play
needs no reiteration here. The
Music Box Theater housed it, and
Arthur Hopkins' production is as
sympathetic and understanding as
a producer whose success this year
is measured by "Machinal" can be.
The supporting cast for Miss
Kennedy includes Donn Cook, Ed-
ward Fielding, Herbert Yost and
and others of distinction.
R. L. A.
HARTMANN-SCIONTI CONCERT
Reviewed by R. Leslie Askren

- I,

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I

W ednesdiay

I

Tim e Is Getting Short
for your
Senior Photo for the Michiganensian
Phone 4434 for an appointment
619 E. Liberty

I

nlght dances
music by

wi th

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delightful

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dm

* * *
Hoover men in the south predict
That if Smith gets the upper hand,
The Pope will buy out America
And make it a Catholic land.
* * *
Why didn't he buy it cheap, we ask,
When the country was for sale,
By Messers Fall and Doheny-
Before they got in jail.
Republicans tolerate men like
Daugherty
And farm relief evasion,
But they cannot or will not tolerate
A man of Catholic persuasion.
We hold that a candidate ought to
tell
His voters what he thinks,
But Hoover, like Coolidge, has
virtually kept
The silence of the Sphinx.
* * *
Smith has shattered a century's
custom,
Of political standard bearers-
He stands committed on all the
issues
But he makes grammatical errors-
So purists are voting for Herbert,
For Smith in the White House
would mean
Some breaches of social etiquette
Like Hylan's remark to the queen.
And Hoover, pudgy, sleek,

Under the auspices of Matinee
Musicale The Hartmann Quartet,
assisted by Silvio Scionti at the
piano, played their way through a
program of varied difficulty com-;
prising Beethoven's Quartet in B
Flat Major, Opus 18, the Debussy
Quartet in G Minor, Opus 10, and
Schumann's Quintet in E Flat
Major, Opus 44 to provide
an evening of very interesting and
at times very finished chamber
music.
The Beethoven selection offered -
considerable difficulty to the play-
ers who found it hard to warm up
into a realization of the demands
of the score until, in the Adagio
and final Allegretto movements,
the capabilities of Beditzky on the
'cello asserted themselves to pro-
vide a well rounded finale.
In the Debussy number, where
the demands for tone color and
rhythmic interpretation were in-
sistent the quartet as a whole dis-
tinguished itself, with the minor
exception of Mr. Hartmann him-!
self, although the second movement
with a broken pizzicatohrhythmI
proved too much for the entire
group. Hartmann's difficulty
seemed to be with a general disin-
terestedness. His tone was notably
weak except in solo passages which
forced him to more determined ef-

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