100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 06, 1928 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-11-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE'

MICHIGAN

DAILY

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1928

THE MICHIG N DAILY.TUSDAY..NOVEBER..,.192

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.F
The Associated Press is- exclusively en-
'6tled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished herein.
Entered at the pnstoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
waster General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
;4.50"
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Mar-
card Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, =2i..
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
XENNETH G. PATRICK
Editor...................Paul J. Kern
City Editor........ Nelson J. Smith
News Edtor........Richard C. Kurvink
Sports Editor................. Morris Quinn
Women's Editor ............. Sylvia S. Stone
Editor Michigan Weekly....J. Stewart Hooker
Music and Drama............R. L. Askren
Assistant City Editor...Lawrence R. Klein
Night Editors
Clarence N. Edelson Charles S. Monroe
] oseph E. Howell Pierce Roo ~berg
onald J. Klinc George E. Simons
George C. Tilley
Reporters
Paul L. Adams C. A. Lewis
Morris Alexander Marian MavDouad
Esther Anderson 11lenrv Merry
C. A. Askren N. S. Pickard
Bertram Askwith Victor Rabinowitz
Louise Behymer Aline Schell
Arthur Bernstein Rachel Shearer
Seton C. Bovee Robert Silbar
[sabel Charles Howard Simon
L. R. Chubb Robert L. S loss
Frank 'P. Cooper Arthur R. Strubel
Helen Domine Edith Thomas
Douglas Edwards Beth Valentine
Valborg Egeland Gurney Williams
Robert . 3Vleldman Walter Wilds
Marjorie Follmer George E. Woblgemuth
William Gentry Robert Woodroofe
Lawrence Hartwit noseph A. Russe
Richard Jung Cad el Swanson
Charles R, Kauf, jn 1 Ste wa rt
Ruth Kelsey Ewar Waner ir.
Donald E. Layman Cleland Wyllie
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
EDWARD L. HULSE
Assistant Manager-RAY MOND WACHTER
Department Manager K
Advertising,...... ........ Alex K. Scherer
Advertising.. ..... .A. James Jordan
Advertising.............Carl W. Hammer
Service........ ........Herbert E. Varnum
Circulation........ .. ..George S. Bradley
Accounts...........Lawrence E. Walkley
Publications..... . Ray M. Hofelich
Assistants
Irving Binzer Jack Horwich
Donald Blackstone Dix Humphrey
Mary Chase Marion Kerr
Jeanette Dale Lillian Kovinsky
Vernor Davis Bernard Larson
Bessie Egeland Leonard Littlejohn
Helen Geer Hollister Mabley
Ann Goldberg Jack Rose'
Kasper Halverson 'arl F. Schemm
George Hamilton Sherwood Upton
Agnes Herwig Marie Wellstead
Walter Yeagley
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1928
Night Editor-CHARLES S. MONROE

is the fact that an instructor who
"handshakes" his way through the
University will get all the favorable
notices under the new scheme; but
if Professor VanTyne was closer to
the student body he would realize
how futile it is for any instructor to
attempt to "Get by" by handshak-
ing and kindred activities. No
audience in the world is more criti-
cal and more keen to detect a flaw
than a group of college students,
and the "Big Bill Thompsons" of
the Michigan faculty will be short-
lived indeed if it is up to the stu-
dent body to aid in weeding them
out.
The third objection which Prof-
essor VanTyne levies against the
plan is that men engaged in re-
search have no time to make friend-
ly contacts with students, and with
this point everyone will agree. If
Professor VanTyne had been more
familiar with the plan before he
criticised it he would have realized
that there is not the slightest in-
tention of discrediting the work of
a University instructor because he
is completely "wrapped up" in re-
search. The question, however,
arises as to whether this man with
a dominant outside interest is as
valuable in the classroom as a man
whose main interest is the students
themselves. To put the question
more directly:
"IS A MAN WHOSE INTERESTS
LIE OUTSIDE OF THE REALM OF
STUDENT AFFAIRS AS VALUABLE
AN INSTRUCTOR AS A MAN WHO,
WHILE WELL-VERSED ON HIS
SUBJECT, STILL RETAINS A
LIVELY INTEREST IN THE PER-
SONALITIES OF THE STUDENTS
HE TEACHES?"T
To say that the University does
not prize its scholars is of course
foolish, and even beyond the scope
of student imagination. But to say
that such a man belongs in the un-
dergraduate class-room is very
questionable, and a point which
Professor VanTyne does not ade-
quately sustain in his recent criti-
cism.
It is regrettable, finally, that Pro-
fessor VanTyne did not acquaint
himself more thoroughly with the
proposal before attacking it; for
certainly the student committee
would have been glad to confer
with him and to have obtained his
views at any time. It should be fur-
ther borne in mind that even
though the students chosen to make
the survey k should err, the errors
would not be likely to result in dis-

OASTED RQLL
I ALFRED
GREATL
When America goes to the pollsj
today
To choose between Hoover and
Smith,
We hope they'll show enough good
sense
To explode the Republican myth.
HOOVER FOR PRESIDENT!
For good Republicans think, you
know,
That God, with, infinite charity,
Moved on the earth and made their
machine
To consecrate prosperity.
HOOVER FOR PRESIDENT!
And pot-bellied barons of bigger
business,
Bloated with fortunes gigantic,
Squeezed on their graft by
Democracy '
Shout that we're gripped by a
panic.
DEMOCRATS SEARCHING
FOR SMITH TOMORROW

i

a ,oHWDRYIA
Music And Drama

l

!A

Voti.MrJ

PIOFESSOR VAN TYNE, CRITIC aster, for faculty men of the most
This is meant to be a very kindly conservative variety will pass on all
editorial. It is not meant as a the information. If it is true that
criticism of Professor VanTyne as Ithese department heads know their
a scholar or even as a teacher; it instructors as teachers (though a
is meant merely as a defense of a reliable student with 18 hours in
student project which Professor the history department declares
VanTyne has attacked. (Professortatyhe hasinever seen Professor
VanTyne has criticised the proposed anTyne visit a class which one of
student survey of certain lesser his instructors was teaching), then
known members of the faculty). no possible objection can be levied
nnhemfirs plae wef-shuld). against the scheme, for these pro-
In the first place, we should all fessors will have a final veto
understand that it is the first duty authority.
of a critic to know his subject
thoroughly, and on this basis it is SEND OFF THAT TEAM
almost safe to assume that students .NDaon THe majo in
chosen to answer questionnaires on Numbered among the major in
various members of the faculty tersectional contests of this com-
would be selected with great care, ing week-end is the Navy-Michigan
not only by other students but by game at Baltimore. On the surface
administrative officials of the Uni- it represents the fourth renewal of
versity. These students would not a private feud which has grown up
be freshmen, as Professor VanTyne between the two schools since 1925.
fears, but would be upperclassmen To date, Michigan is one up on the
who had made a reputation for sta- Navy, having won both of the con-
bility and conduct during their tests played in Ann Arbor while the
three or four previous years. As a Navy has won the one game played
matter of fact., they would not be at Baltimore.
much more likely to be swayed by Aside from the fact that the Mid-
passion or prejudice than the men dies are especially desireous of
two or three years their senior on winning in order to square ac-
whom they might be asked to pre- counts on the records, it must be
sent an opinion. So much for that. remembered that the Navy suffered
But the real point at issue be- three defeats before gaining. a vic-
tween Professor VanTyne and the tory this fall. After the victory, the
proponents of the plan is a much'j Annapolis team showed a reversal
larger one, involving a whole theory of form and beat Pennsylvania.
of education. The question really The Michigan team, fresh from
seems to be whether a University is victory over Illinois, leaves at 4:30
a cooperative enterprise, conducted o'clock Thursday afternoon for
by students and faculty for the Baltimore. No pep meeting has
benefit of both or whether it is been planned for the game al-
merely an administrative unit de- though no Michigan team has ever
signed to turn out educations as deserved one more. Failing this it
Ford turns out automobiles. The seems only fair that Michigan's stu-
further question' arises whether a dent body should demonstrate its
Universityis a place where a stu- loyalty to that team in some other
dent can make close personal con- way.
tacts with faculty members of Rousing send offs have become.
whether it a rendezvous of scholars almost a myth in Ann Arbor. Yet
and scientific investigators, who in the memory of old graduates,
only tolerate students because they there have been times when Maize
can pay tuition. and Blue teams received mighty
Professor VanTyne has held that demonstrations of confidence as
instructors who give deliberately they left for foreign fields.
difficult courses will be the victims! Michigan's new team is develop-
of unlimited student criticism un- ing rapidly. It has proved that it
der the plan. The contention is possesses a great fighting heart. It
utterly false; and doubtless Profes- is going to Baltimore determined to
sor VanTyne will be amazed to win. And it will win! It needs and
learn that a large part of the de- deserves, nevertheless, the staunch

Democratic Nominee
pleasantly surprises his friends
who are attempting to rescue him
from beneath Republican landslide.
HOOVER FOR PRESIDENT!
While millions of farmers forced to
the city
In a homeless and bankrupt
procession,
With Republicans steering the ship
of state
Is just a normal depression.
HOOVER FOR PRESIDENT!
Yet plenty of people seem to think
That Republican leaders deserve
To be called prosperity's guardians
Though they fought the Federal
Reserve.
HOOVER FOR PRESIDENT!
Another thing we like to see
Is Hoover's righteous merriment
When people die of poison rum
For his great and noble experiment.
HOOVER FOR PRESIDENT!
We're for Smith and state-sold
goods
And the wholesome liquor breath-
For the day when a man must drink
.for years
To drink himself to death.
HOOVER FOR PRESIDENT!
In seven long years not a G. O. P.
whisper
Has been heard against Teapot
Dome,
But they've poisoned the South
with a whisper campaign
'Gainst the party of Rum and
Rome.
CURTIS LAUDS SHAPE
OF NOMINEE'S HEAD
- THAT'S AN
IOWA ~uT-'
Hoover men in the south predict
That if Smith gets the upper hand,
The Pope will buy out America
And make it a Catholic land.
HOOVER FOR PRESIDENT!
Why didn't he buy it cheap, we ask'
When the country was for sale,
By Messers Fall and Doheny-
Before they got in jail.
HOOVER FOR PRESIDENT!
Republicans tolerate men like
Daugherty
And farm relief evasion,
But they cannot or will not tolerate
A man of Catholic persuasion.
HOOVER FOR PRESIDENT!
We hold that a candidate ought to
tell
His voters what he thinks,
But Hoover, like Coolidge, has
virtually kept
The silence of the Sphinx.
HOOVER FOR PRESIDENT!
Smith has shattered a century's
custom
Of political standard bearers-
He stands committed on all the
issues1
But he makes grammatical errors-
HOOVER FOR PRESIDENT!
So purists are voting for Herbert,
For Smith in the White House
would mean
Some breaches of social etiquette
Like Hylan's remark to the queen.
HOOVER. FOR PRESIDENT!
And Hoover, pudgy, sleek,
complacent,
Fatter than Cal-otherwise the

Q U
HARTMANN-SCIONTI CONCERT
Tonight in Mimes theater, Mat-
inee Musical open their series of
programs of chamber music with
the appearance of the Arthur Hart-
mann String Quartet and Silvio
Scionti, pianist.
The Hartmann group is firmly
established in its reputation in
spite of its youth as an organization.
It was established for the musical
season of 1925-26 and according to
the critics at the Manhattan debut,
the fidelity with which the pro-
gram was handled, placed the then
new Quartet in the heart of the
best chamber music tradition. Un-
doubtedly, credit for this success
goes to Mr. Hartmann, for the care
with which he has chosen the mu-
sicians to make up body. They are
Walter Edelstein, playing second
violin to Arthur Hartmann, Mitya
Stillman, viola, and Naoum Ben-
ditzky with the violincello.
Mr. Hartmann's own musical car-
eer is also the history of his life.
He began it in Philadelphia as a
child prodigy and when he had
reached the age of 12 he had played
through the entire repertoire for
the violin, both here and abroad.
While he was in Paris he played
concertos by both Saint-Saens and
Godard, with those two composers
accompanying him; a Beethoven
concerto he played with Hans Rich-
ter, and with Debussy he appeared
in a number of recitals in Paris.
When he was 20, Hartmann organ-
ized his own string quartet in Ber-
lin. This venture met with con-
siderable critical approval, but en-
semble playing was soon given up
in favor of solo work and composi-
tion. His original creations, as wel
as his Work in transcription, is
widely known both here and abroad
Over a hundred of his works are
published in this country alone
and they are played and recorded
by Heifetz, Kreisler, Elman, Renee
Chemet and other violinists.
Walter Edelstein, whom Mr.
Hartmann has chosen to support
him in the violin department, is a
graduate of the Damrosch Institute
of Musical Art in New York. He
was a pupil of the late Franz
Kneisel from whom he received a
thorough.training in the standard
chamber of music literature. "A
period of study at the Fontainebleu
Conservatoire in France brought
him further honors, and then he
gave a series of concerts in Europe
which culminated in a highly suc-
cessful concert at Aellian Hall for
his American debut.
Mitya Stillman graduated from
the Conservatory at Kiev, Russia,
and was concert master of the Kiev
Symphony Orchestra for four years.
He was also a member of the Kiev
String Quartet for five, and when,
in 1921, he came to this country he
distinguished himself by winning
first prize in Detroit for his String
Quartet.
Naoum Beditzky is also Russian-
born in the Ukrain. He began his
musical education on the 'cello at
the ripe age of seven, and the
maturity of 16 brought him the
position as chief 'cellist with one
of the leading Russian symphony
orchestras. A further period of
study in Paris with the Russian
master, Joseph Press, prepared him
for a concert tour through the Or-
ient and Central Europe, and led

to his affiliation in this country
with various chamber music or-
ganizations until he accepted Mr.
Hartmann's proposal.
The guest pianist was previously
announced to be Leo Ornstein, but
illness making his appearance im-
possible, Matinee Musical has man-
aged to secure the services of Silvio
Scionti to balance the program.
Scionti has been accorded place
by prominent Chicago critics-he
hails from that town, though or-
iginally from Sicily-as a "virtuoso"
and a "poet;" the combination of
these two qualities is as captivat-
ing as it is exceptional. He is a
thorough musician and one who
combines originality with beauty of
interpretation. Whatever the school,
Beethoven, Chopin, Brahms or De-
bussy, the rich versatility of an ex-
ceptionally fine equipment makes
his interpretations authoritative as
well as brilliant.
Sicilian by birth, one does not
need to know his origin to discern
marked characteristics in his work
-suavity, warmth and a kind of
lingering quality in both touch and

f

FROG BRAND SLICKERS
are guaranteed waterproof, made
of light-weight material with
plenty of room for your comfort.
,A genuine oiled slicker will keep
you dry on rainy days.
FROG BRAND SLICKERS
are obtainable at men's
stores, haberdashers and
department stores.
Get yours - TODA Y
H. M. SAWYER & SON
EAST CAMBRIDGE -- MASS.
ARC A D E
T H EAT RE -
~NOTICE
This Week is the 1928
M. G. M.
Revival Week
Each Day
A Specially Selected Gem from
M. G. M.'s 1928 Products.
TODAY ONLY
LILLIAN GISH
in
Her most talked of role since the
"Birth of a Nation," from Chan-
ning Pollock's great stage suc-
cess.
Comedy News
Matinees Evenings
10c, 20c 10c, 20c, 30c
Tomorrow Only
GRETA GARBO
in
THE DIVINE WOMAN
CHARLES CHAPLIN in
THE FIREMAN

MEANS
THAT
l

SOON
ACROSS TO SINGAPORE
WEST POINT
and
FLESH AND THE DEVIL

Hand Made Handkerchiefs for
Christmas Gifts
THE QUA LITY
HEMSTITCHING SHOP
Alterations and Dressmaking
Choose your Costume Jewelry
from our stock
KLENZONA CLEANS CLOTHES
OVER CRIPPEN'S DRUG STORE
rMnag emeIt Service
A branch of our property management depart-
4 ment that has been developed for service to
fraternities and sororities-the demand for this
branch has been made evident by the fact that
very few organizations are satisfied with their
financial progress.
Our Specialized Services
Enable you to appoint an experienced committee
as g1ardian of your buidget
WE BUILD YOUR BUDGET
KEEP UP CONTRACTS
MAKE YOUR CONTRACTS
CREATE SINKING FUNDS
COLLECT YOUR INCOME
AMORTIZE BONDS
MAINTAIN THE HOUSE
PAY TAXES
WATCH YOUR KITCHEN
WATCH DISCOUNTS
DIRECT YOUR JANITOR
BUY FUEL-SUPPLIES
DECORATE AND REPAIR
DO EVERYTHING
WE SAVE OUR SMALL FEE SEVERA TIMES
CHARLES L. BROOKS
Real Estate Exchange, Inc.
Brooks Blidg. Telephone 2-2571

Subscribe

®-

-11

to The Michigan Daily

P

19~

ts

t-At T7[[

theOkLwith Commerce
HE air map of America is now in the making-on
the ground.
Ten years ago, there were 218 miles of air mail routes with
two station stops; to-day, a network of sky roads bridges
the country .from the Atlantic to the Pacific and from
Canada to the Gulf of Mexico.

A majority of the beacon
lights used in airport and
airway illumination have
been designed and manu-

Can you imagine this growth without electricity-without
illuminated airports-without trunk lines studded with
electric beacons?
Men of vision are building for increasing traffic of the air.
Soon, the skies will be filled with commerce.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan