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November 06, 1928 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-11-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

" 1MCH T HE MIC HI.GAN

DALY~w

SUNDAY,

PMENT R[C ID Last Of "Three Musketeers" Carries On
ilL Even After Deaths Of His Two Buddies!

TO BROADCAST SIXTHI COLLEGENEWS %
Si ii UhF" fl PITh flflO fl 0

Uv NIft H NI IT rmuUruII

T

BY FORESTRY SCHOOL Continuing its regular schedule
of broadcasting, the sixth of the
current series of the Universityf
NEW MACHINE IS EQUIPPED Michigan Night radio programs will
WITH NEW FEATURES be put on the air between 7 o'clockd
OF OPERATION and 8 o'clock next Thursday nightj
Nov. 3, through WJR, Detroit. Thisu
HOUSED IN HEATING UNIT will be the second program to bes
broadcast from the new studio erec~
Timbers of South American Forests ted in Morris hall, located at the
To Be Tested to Determine corner of State and Jefferson
Mechanical Properties i strets.
n _ r rsAs was the case last week, when
Equipment is being installed as over 300 attended the opening of
rapidly as possible in the new tim- the studio, the public will be ad-
ber mechanics laboratory of the mitted to witness the broadcastig
School of Forestry, which is located of the program. While the artists
in the old heating unit behind may be seen through soundproof
South Wing hospital, it was an- .windows, their words and music willc
nounced by Prof. William Kynoch b presented to the audience
yesterday. A new timber testing through a receiving set located ino
machine of the Riehle universal the auditorium.
testing type has just been received. Included on this week's programC
It has a' capacity of 60,000 pounds. are talks to be given by Hugh Cabot,
The new machine is electrically professor of surgery and dean of
operated and arranged so that <..r Medical school, who will speak on:
head speeds of considerable vari- "The Surgeon's View of the Grade
ance can be obtained. It is also Crossing;" Prof. William H. Hobbs,t
capable of being operated by hand. who figured in the press this sum-2
In aditon te apartus s , t -- "s T. Ymer as the rescuer of the Rockford7
equipped with all accessories fori es e und h et
testing of timber in accordance future air route to Europe will
with methods developed by leadingI . bevaG rnndPofDnilL
Rich, of. the physics department,t
timberresearch laboraories o eoai erln~ e
world. will speak of his research work in
The immediate work which the Acoustics; and Prof. E. Blythe
school of Forestry and Conservation Stason, of the law school, will talk
has on hand is the testing of vari-; on "The Governmental Regulation
ous tirbers of South American for- of Passenger Carries by Motor Bus."
ests, which were collected last win- The musical portion of the
ter. According to Prof. Kynoch, Above is pictured Lieutenant Irving Woodring, and below his late program will be furnished by the
there are four or five thousand University School of Music ensem-
uses of wood, and each kind of buddies, Lieutenants J. J. Williams, left, and W. A. Cornelius. Wood- ble orchestra under the direction
timber is endowed with certain rmg is the lone survivor of the famous Army flying trio with whom of Joseph E. Maddy, head of theI
mechanical properties, which is Colonel Lindbergh recently flew in the place of Lieutenant Williams.' public school music department of
the purpose of the new machine to In spite of the fates of his comrades, Lieutenant Woodring is still that school. The feature artist will
determine. The South American carrying on, and daily, over Rockwell field station here, he is trying be Albert Lockwood, head of thel
field has been little exploited be- out new flyers to fill the places left by his buddies. pianoforte department of the
cause of ignorance of the utility School of Music.
of its timbers. Lower Rubber Prices Seen By Matthews
A Rs__BubTcArbe$torThe MichigantDaily,.
inri D~l an h~n~ATAs Result Of British Treaty Abrogation ~bJer I' ot t

MINNESOTA MEN TURN
TABLES ON GIRL FRIENDS
MINNESOTA-C 1 a i n i n g that
women have usurped the majority
of positions held by men, running
from social activities to the indus-
trial world, a group of men stu-
dents here have formed a "Dutch
Dates" club whose policy it is that
women should have a share in
some of the unfortunate parts of
companionship.
SENIORS AT CINCINNATI
TAKE UP BERET WEARING
UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI-
Male members of the senior classes
of the engineering, architectural,
commercial, and applied arts
classes have taken up the fad of
wearing berets. This fad is entire-
ly distinct from any fad taken up
other universities.
CORDUROY TROUSERS WILL
BE ENGINEERING COSTUME
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-
Corduroy trousers have been
adopted as the compulsory costume
of all engineering students here.
This sturdy apparel is' being
adopted as a social reform to save
students from running expensive
clothing in the laboratory.
Subscribe to The Michigan Daily,
$4.00 per year. It's worth it!

1

GOOD GOVERNMENT GUNS TO GUARD
POLLS FROMPROSCRIBED PEOPLE
o C r orders of politica terrorists.
CHICAGO. Nov. 5.-To prevent a The violence and terrorism of
repetition of the fraud, violence last primary election day, April
and terrorism which marked the 10, have been followed by months
April primaries, 15,000 poll watch- of investigation by special grand
ers will guard Chicago's ballot juries, whose work is yet unfinish-
boxes Tuesday. ed. One slaying, conspiracies and
This, the largest array of elec- divers outbreaks of violence caus-
tion day watchers in the city's his- ed indictments to be returned
tory, has been enrolled despite of- against a score of reputed partici-
ficial's confident predictions that pants, princip ally alleged hench-
the election will be free from dis- 'men of certain political leaders.

.
...

_.
...

, "

Mat. RAE
2-4E

Nite
7-9

LAST TIMES
TODY mHurry!
TODAY
This-Comedienne's
..rlirdhfulest No vie
A.__
® a r

Jean Hersholt and Alice Joyce
in
3 Washington Sq.
Also a Collegian
"BENSON AT CALFORD"
and
VALLEY OF SEVEN MOONS

IO"Tires will be cheap for a period
of one year from now in view of
Great Britain's abrogation of theI
Stephenson act establishing a prac-
tical monoply of the crude rubber
production," declared Prof. D. M.
"No idealism can stand before Matthews, of the forestry school,
"No dealsm. an tandbefoe Iyesterday.
the withering attack of 'bunk,'" According to a report of the De-
said Dr. Stuart A. Courtis, professor partment of Commerce, it was
of education, on "Idealism in Edu- noted by Professor Matthews that,
cation before the regular meeting 125,000 pounds of rubber will come
from Great Britain and enough
of the Men's Educational club last more from other sources to raise
night. the amount to more than 200,000
"This age socially marks the within the months of November and
turning point of the centuries, and December. This amount has al-,
education is the major influence ready been contracted for by Uni-
ted States rubber firms at the low
4which will swing the delicate bal- price of 18.9 cents a pound. He
ance in one direction or the other," also noted that the price had been
Professor Courtis continued. "To- tumbling since last February when
day man has more power wealth it was 30 cents a pound. The fall
and resources than ever before. discontinuence of the law by
Whether he will use these for good Britain.
or bad depends entirely upon the The Stephenson act was an at-
way in which he is taught to tempt by Great Britain to set up
think." legal control of the rubber produc-
tion in view of the fact that most
Professor Coutis went on to say of the plantations have been in her
that there is not enough of the territories. The rising production
ideal in education today. The of the Dutch and plantation work
utilitarian motive of self-interest done by various American interests
to guide everyone's actions and the have practically necessitatedl the
desresdiscontinuence of such a monop-
gratification of personal-desires olistic law with its expiration on
appears to be the dominant in- Nov. 1.
fluence of the age. In stating that the price of crude
"The primary issues in education rubber would probably remain at
at the present are democracy and the Present bottom price, Professor
the coordination in teaching of the Matthews prophesied that the
subject matter with the personality
of the students," Professor Courtis
added. "People preach democracy,
talk of it constantly, but never put,
it into practice. To put this across
in the schools and colleges of the
country a different type of super-
intendent and teacher must be
trained. No ideal can be put into
practice successfully unless some-
one is willing to put his life and
energy into its perfection."
After Professor Courtis' talk the
club completed its regular business
with the enrollment of several new
members.4

smaller rubber concerns would en-
joy better conditions because or
the lower and more stable price.
"The effect with the bigger com-
panies will not be so notable, but
they will also gradually benefit," he
concluded.E
'Zee Talks To Forum
At Meeting Sunday!
The first of a series of interna-j
tional forums was held Sunday aft-
ernoon in Lane hall. T. T. Zee ad-
dressed the meeting on "The Chi-
nese Nationalist Movement and its'
international importance." The
meeting was in charge of John M..
Brumm, '31, and William Palmer ,
'29, co-chairmen of the interna-
tional committee of the Student'
Christian association, under whose
auspices the meeting was held. An-
other forum will be held on Nov. 18,
when another address will be givenI
by some student on an important
international problem .j
KM" MAN WINS AWARD
Allen C. Lomont, '29, a 'Varsity1
half-miler, has been awarded a $100
scholarship for being the "M" man
with the highest scholastic record
during the past year. The award
is an annual one made by the Board'
in Control of athletics.

, . : ,
1

NOWGA.M
I Willam Fox
V/
r DaMid lollin Syue Crol
DAVID BUTLERm
TWIN STAGE BILL
LIBBY DANCERS BILLY HALLEN
"Sports a la Mode" "Applesauce"
MIDNIGHT STARTS ELECTION
SHOW 1 P. M. RETURNS
TUESDAY - TONIGHT!
NEXT SUNDAY-GEORGE BANCROFT

I

Poi
2:0
8:
50
10

cy:
E00
35
-I
10
Deft and dainty-i
amusing-here is a
dramatization of
priceless musical c
--this tasty pies
cinema caviar will
you why Park A
moved to Broadway
"Oh Kay.;" ran fo
solid year on the
Alley.
,,. With

Adultly
film-
that
cmed
ce of
show
Avenue
when
r. one
Mazda

-Ai

Lawrence
Gray
CLAUDE

Alan Ford
Hale Sterling
GILLINGWATER

I

U

...--.

APPOINTMENTS
MICHIGAN=
ILLINOIS
Football Pictures

That Wonderful Kid Star-
BIG BOY
"THE GLOOM CHASER"
Fables News Art & Beauty

T W1EIRTH
THE HOME OF DISTINCTIVE PHOTOPLAYS

l

STARTING WEDNESDAY
Another Great Mid-Week Bill

ofters
ALL THIS WEEK
I9
r'+ The Gala Event of the Year. The
Phenomenon of the Age-
transformed into the miracle of the
screen-at a cost of $2,000,000
f in money-and two years of
effort-the most important novel
ever written in this country has
been transformed into a dra-
matic marvel.
For 75 years it has touched the
/, hearts of millions. 'Generations
f ; have loved it and passed it on te
the next generation to love. But
it remained for Carl Laemmle to
transform its intensity and far-
reaching sympathy into the
. GREATEST HUMAN DRAMA
EVER SCREENED.
f iiAp~' ii~

AIN'T FATE GREAT!

'X

I.
1'

e
s
0
t

U N IV r -S A L . t A A S T E-.rp c-C E

Mr NE
WIm IRUT54 ELLRIT&
Join the Marines and see the girls! See what
Dix in a uniform won. See Ruth Elder, of At-
lantic flying fame, soar in the skies. See how

i

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