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October 30, 1928 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-10-30

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30, 1928

""HE MICHRICAN

DAILY

'6
Y
',fin

T~TAKNSAS PASTORENTER EFENSE A~RCH AEOLOGICAL EXPEDI"TION TO BEATi IB
?DO Nt A OF JAILED ATHEIST GPOUP LEADERUI SIYGADAEAGIVEN' NEW SIXBY DODGE COMPANY [D
fli. A[TD QRVUS Dr. x'YV >.l Rob hm &o mSI Cm') S.The nexyear theĀ£ car.
UILOI#lILtoi.UIXIL)re i 'elt fte' ~a '..evdA a oi " avtins thl1e iteU
. f <p f ~~~word fruui ; , Clk lecv '-et i CC,':f o h C~1in .A5:,. Minor
Of~ASTYFOTAL Io te eta cleg, r Alfr d e ity Nar t oa iDc,-c L , y i e valsleeen n-
Aformer member of the faculty Li.it, th 1? it _s re in to 1 V.hsgnUjIn a
GR~N,_ASTUNIofnthe Dnaborforetherpastfld I Dogers eatat texPdiUn ivbwe ileledietwenIat e's c
J. Shroeer,13D a practising wt Victory Six to replace the the Payoum and Cairo. As the oft i.
JILL NS SPENT IN SPORT tionierhas
WLTIENMANY OLDEE 13 years, died at 8:30 o'clock yes- years. Delivery on the car will be site of ancient Karanis in the departn
v ; w3f( 0 { S Sterday morning at his home at made as soon as the University' norh -east corner of the province nish hr
1228 White street, after an illness officials are able to Indcae Hi .,Faycj;L z, leca r has had to do Hle "O'c
o averstyle of node they tb wok saitd'bl^Vl so ( e 'd riving and has seen i Anao

of University inspet
hpools, different divis
rents of the Univers

onser-
ischools
the Di-
ctlon of
.ons and
sity~ fur-
%rvices to
nto th~e

f 4

"Octo .. s" Is Label Given Football
By Article In Current Issue
'4f Harper's Magazine
An 'anti-football faction, as yet
'compratively inarticulate but
;rapidly gaining strength, is an out-I
standing factor in American col-
ege ffe today, -according to an
articl by John R. Tunis in the cur-
!rent Harper's magazine.
We ;are waking up to the realiza-
Ition that football is "a first-class;
btoppus which is strangling many
'of 'the legitimate pursuits of our
'educatonal institutions," he says,,
quoting figures from several col-
leges to support his contention.
"Ouit of 'an income of more than
a million dollars derived from foot-
~all a' Harvard University in 1924,
$36,0oQ was spent on v ros in-
tercollegiate- teams and their'
traveling expenses, coaches, train-
ers, and uniforms.
Stanford Buys Equipment
During the same year Stanford
University's athletic receipts were
$194,000, and after paying for a
football stadium, a basketball sta-
dium, team expenses and equip-
mxet, it spent the generous sum
of $,500 on intramural sprts,"
he states. According to an official
report, Ohio State spent $13,000 for
intramural athletics and ,$127,017
toward a new stadium in 1924.
Student protest at the "elaborate
ritual'' that has grown up around
football is also increasing, accord-
ing to Tunis. "There are almost as
many football officials as players
on the field, and they are hand-
picked for each game by a High
Commissioner who receives a salary
of $10,000 for the job," he says. I
Watch Officials
"Last season more than $3,000
was spent for spies to watch the
officials and report upon their f air-
ness and the quality of their offi-
ciating. This f all there is talk1
Of spies being set to watch the
spies at an additional cost of $3,000.
Many thinking graduates, under-
graduates, fac' ulty members, and
college presidents would be happy
if football could be abolished with-
out upsetting the athletic systems
of the colleges generally.''
New Currency To Be .
4' Released Next Year
After July 1, 1929, the new United
States paper currency will be in cir-
culation. The H#ureau of Engraving
is working on the designs now, and
eventually all the present bills in
circulation will be replaced.
The new paper bills will be six
and five-sixteenths inches long and
two and eleven-sivteenths inches;
wide. The size of the present cur-
rency is seven and three-eighths;
inches by three and one-eighh
inches. All the new blls bear a I
portrait of -a, famous American on
the front, and the $1 bills and de-
nominations over $100 will have or-
namental backs. All the others will
have";engravings of buildings on the
backs,.
On the $1 bills will be a likeness
of Wahington,' on the $2 'one of
Jefferson, $5, Lincoln, $10, Hamil-
ton, $20, Jackson, $50, Grant, $100
Franklin, $500, McKinley, $1,000,
Cleveland, $5,000, Madison, and
$10,000, Chase.
Subscribe to The Michigan Daly,
$4.00 per year. It's worth it!
good News
Regular Dinner 35c
Regular Supper 30c
Lenas Diner
210 S. 5th Ave. Home Cooking
-1

Dr. Schroeder, born Sept. 8, 1878,
in' Detroit, obtained his elementary
education at Rogers City, later
studying at Mt. Pleasant, Valparai-
so, Ind., and at Ferris Institute at
Big Rapids. He then came to the
University and graduated from the
dental college.
Following his graduation, Dr.
Schroeder accepted a position in
the department of clinical dentis-
try as instructor, continuing in this
oapacity until 1919, 'when he re-
signed to devote his entire time to
his private practise established in
1915,
Funeral services will be held at
2 o'clock, Tuesday afternoon at
Muehlig's funeral parlors and at
2:30 at St. Paul's Lutheran church.
The body will be taken to Rogers
City for services and interment.
Subscribe to.The Michigan Daily,
$4.00 per year. It's worth it!

Ii U.c liiii O11
the officials of the Douge opn
presented the University with a
sedan of their make and a Grahlam
truck. In February of that year
the sedan was delivered a n
werp, Belgium adwsd'e
from srto Ra'n 0.1'&~'
17 Nick' s

s

numa
cutu

(li no~' c rads~'i' Sme C~OiiUt~ Z3~i(uJ~il~mmg ~i tisre~-
LOW cmlyadedfea~;. re reference
W id -s rceied romthe field .. ;1 andbO~k5 L-m the iA-
K "oa;at h expe itinthat the b::" cnii~srvcmaterials
s~c aa asbalyworn out and there I n =iryad conservation fromi
wsarequeist for a 'new one~ to ''he fores try school, and informa,-
be supplied by the University offi- tion on vocational work from the
('ladeducation school.

RIBBONS
and
SUPPLIES
for all makes of
TYPEWRITERS

. ;, t, { v
, : '
.; !

When Charles Smith, of New Ycork, president of the American
Association for the Adv-ne'-merit of Atheism, was jailed by,. Little Rock
police for distributing , -,.bc stic i -opaganda, Rev. Ben. M. Bogard (in-
set) came out publicly in his defense. Rev. Bogard declared he was
not in, ,accordance with Smith's views but held that the police had no
right to put him in jail. Smith is shown with his pet monkey.
Chocolate Camp~
f 0Hot F u dg-e Sutndae!
Hot Chocolate!
You Never Tasted the Equal
516 William... one block from State.I
B3irneys' on Ice Cream
Shipped' Daily from Grand Rapids
_ _ _ _ -r-------
err_ -. --- - r
_ Mr aSOnly2-
Canoeing
WE CLOSE NOV. 1, 1928
-on the Huron Riv'er at Foot o-f Cedar St. w

Rapid turnover, fresh stock, .insu.
best quality at a moderate price.
17 Nickels Arcade Pt

ORDER YOUR SEATS NOW! .
INew York Theatre Gutild (Y
- -
- PRESENTS
- -
SThe Doctor's Dilemma.. Wed. Eve.No 1
SThe Second Mian .... Mon. Eve., Nov. 1
~Ned McCobb's Daughter Wed. Eve., Nov.:28
SJohn Ferguson ........ Mon. Eve.; Dec-.-3 :
I_ Auspices: Michigan Theatre League
Sale of Season Tickets Closes
- Saturday, Nov. 3rd.
s Sale of Tickets for Single Perf o7-JC S a tsM nd y N v 5h
Box Office
Print and Book Shop
521 E. Jefferson St. Telephone 2 108S1

. ..4

-m

laud

^i&

PEAK to the trainer,
SJ the coach, the doctor,
or the physiology pro-

fessor.

They'll tell you

that there is a' no more
healthful habit than
your daily two biscuits o f

1-
I;

Whc at
WITH MILK OR CREAM

Subscri be

to The Michigan Daily

Dormitoli les

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y-.- 61V' IM av AN OL3. EEX TtE$ o
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o 8ucI_0 LOAD au No MO'
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OPTICAL
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-Lenses and Frames made a
To Order
S Opticali Prescriptions
Filled
. HALLERS
State St. Jewelers
rrrIriI i I~it lrlr lIII invnn iluiI iiiii
IHALLOWE'EN If

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i
r
.,
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4

DANCE

W ednesday

I4
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- -- ---

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10 .. .

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