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October 25, 1928 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-10-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.DNS FOR RESEARCH'
TER STERN TRIP

ECKENER PLACES WREATH ON TOMB
OF AMERICA'S UNKNOWN SOLDIER
'IN HVNOARIA'N CAPITAL,

FACULTY MEMBERS
FROM SURVEY
SCHOOLS

RETURN
OF

STUDY MENTAL GROWTh
Will Plan Program For Children
And Make Study Of
Activities

Members of a committee ap-
pointed by the Board of Regentst
to prepare a set of directions for
the construction of a laboratory}
school in educational researchk
have just returned from a visit to
several eastern institutions.
Those men on the committee
who made the trip were Prof. J. B. 4
Edmonson, Dr. Raleigh Schorling, &
H.D Fswho has been appoint-'
ed Fih to assist the building commit-
tee, and A. W. Balle, who has been
engaged as architect of the new
structure.
The trip was taken primarily 'to,
secure information as to the type
of work being carried on in some Dr. Hugo Eckener, left, cominan- the tomb of the Unknown Soldier,
of the newer schools in the east, der of the huge Graf ice,;elin during Eckener's visit in Washing-
especially those studying physical which recently completed a hazar- ton, D. C. Assisting him is Herr
and mental growth of infants and dous flight across the Atlantic, is Emit Baer, secretary of the Ger-
children of pre-kindergarten ages. pictured here placing a wreath on man embassy.
Show Interest In Workn-
"Everywhere we went," said Pro- nosed by bringg nerouse tebest PONTIAC PUPILS
fessor Edmonson, "we found a Tr
most genuine interest in the type That educational research has TO HEAR ALLEN
of work that is to be undertaken an almost inestimable value is
at the University in the study of shown by the fact that the Gen- As a part of the extension ser-
the laws of physical and mental eral Education board has endowed vice toward conservation, S. W.
growth." the Lincoln School of New York Allen, of the forestry school will
The buildings which were visited with a three million dollar fund speak to the pupils of the Pontiac
were viewed with the idea of con- for the purposes of study. There high school on "Conservation of
structing a new research labora- is a need to realize by careful study Natural Resources." In conjunc-
tory guaranteeing a sound health many of the present day practices tion with his talk he will present
program for children -in a school that are generally accepted as the film "Forests and Wealth"
with a modern curriculum which standard, conservative, and with a which the Forestry school recently
could make possible the careful good past record. purchased.
study of procedures and results of " mIIIII lUil1! ltinll l11111111lme
children's activities. The schools,
visited were the Institute for Child c
Guidance, the Lincoln school, the {{ ( Vh)
Ethical Cultureschool, all in NewV",
clinic at New Haven, and the Mass- iCIE
achusetts school for crippled chil-
dren at Canton, Mass.
Recognize Educational Need wY C-
Among the public and especially - - ___-
among men of wealth there has -
recently been a great awakening -
as to the need of careful and de
tailed study in education. Each of;
the eastern schools inspected had -
on its force a large group of work-I=
ers including educators, psychia-
trists, biologists, statisticians, and I
psychologists. They treat more
than 1,000 cases a year of the fee-
ble-ninded and criminally inclin-1
ed. Each case is carefully diag-
We pride ourselves on the promptness and
courteousness of our Delivery Service. With
us, this Service is a matter of minutes, and
not of hours.
301% South State Street
ANN ARBOR, MICH. "Say It With Flowers"
Enjoy yourself having ANN ARBOR FLORAL CO.
Luncheon or Tea at
122 E. Liberty Phone 6215
the quaint Tea Room,1i
Vhere the Tea pours THE FLOWER SHOP
from 12 noon until 12 =State and Liberty Phone 6030=-
night. . W
A Teaologist Will Read CAMPUS FLORISTS
the Leaves=115 South University Phone 7434
____H______________1l_________111111111li___ _lli_____!!_____i_______ 'l11il1_

(By Associated Press)
BUDAPEST, Oct. 24-Following
anti-Semetic rioting in which stu-
dents and workmen participated
and during which there were nu-
merous minor casualties and 140
arrests made by the police in Bu-
dapest, four Hungarian universi-
ties today were closed.
Student rioting spread as far as.
the city of Debreczin, where, ac-
cording to reports from the Ex-
change Telegraph correspondent,
Martin Reiner, an American, Was
injured in the rioting. Police e#-
forts to quell the disturbances con-1
sisted mainly of charging into the
groups of students intent upon as-
saulting Jews.
Starting several weeks ago, the
outbreaks were caused by students
when they charged the 3Govern-
ment of foisting upon the univer-
sity a greater proportion of Jewish
students than the law allowed.

ASSOCIATION WILL1
HEAR PROFESSORS
At the annual meeting of the
Michigan Educational association'
to be held in Detroit on October
25, 26, and 27, three members of
the University faculty will make
addresses.
Prof. Peter M. Jack of the Rhet-
oric department will speak on "The
Teaching of English in England,"
Dr. George E. Meyers, professor of
vocational education, on "Improv-
ed Curriculum for Commercial
Teachers," and Dr. Eugene S. Mc-
Cartney, editor of Scholarly publi-
cations in the graduate school, on
"Life and Monuments of the Rom-
an Campagna."
The annual meetings of the As-
sociation constitute a prominent
feature, but its work is continued
continuously throughout the year.
The members are kept constantly
informed as to the latest develop-
ments in education and are sent a
monthly magazine.
Guides will meet incoming visi-
tors at all railroad stations in De-
troit to direct them to hotels or
other places to which they may
'wish to go.

dfl11 [t11Itl lililltllilltllillllifllllitllil tlliflll i11U 111tlll ll llllillillfll lllD
Before Nouveber 1st=.
a-%Order Your
ENGRAVED
r GREETING-
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:Supplying you with Personal -Engraved Greeting Cards is not
such an easy matter as passinng you a pencil over the counter
:First your name or insignia must be engraved on a copper plate -
-and this operation-,requires some time . .. about two weeks
~from the time you place, your order until the cards are
Sdelivered.
SSave 10% by {ordering Before Nov. lst.
-The MyrScarrCopnr
Stationers, Printers, Binders, Office Outfitters
112 South Main Street Phone 4515
91l1i! ilili10lI Ulul hlilll ltllitllt1 EI~u u uI1Mf'11 f1 MI 'i iilitfi tgiTlit[

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